ACLS provided for Telemetry nurses?

  1. Hi all- Just got hired for an 8 week orientation in Telemetry - not sure what to expect. I've heard MONITOR THE PATIENT, not the monitor. Anything else I should know?

    Also, they mentioned sending me to an EKG course, but not ACLS. Would I be out of line to ask to get my ACLS while working in the Telemetry unit? Thanks for any comments.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   KC CHICK
    No, you wouldn't be out of line to ask......although, they may or may not provide the course to you. My hospital paid for my ACLS course but not all do. Also, until recently, ACLS was required for my tele unit....now it's not. I'm glad I got it taken care of before I started on the floor.
    It concerns me that it wouldn't be required on a CARDIAC floor. I'd want my nurse to be certified if I was a heart patient. Anyway...doesn't hurt to ask....and you'll learn some great stuff.
    And, it's true....monitor the patient. I've seen a pt. in v-tach (long runs in a row BTW) that was sitting up in bed looking around at all the activity going on around her. She was transferred to ICU.....but, goes to show that each patient can tolerate an arrythmia differently. Others may have passed out. Many can have runs of SVT and not be symptomatic at all.....so don't expect to fire up the 'ol defib and shock as soon as you get into the room! Some of these patients have already experienced these arrythmias at home and just didn't have a clue that it was happening until they got hooked up to monitors at the hospital and someone told them what was going on. It's amazing what the body gets used to sometimes.

    Anne
    Last edit by KC CHICK on Aug 10, '02
  4. by   live4today
    Originally posted by rn2binmay
    Hi all- Just got hired for an 8 week orientation in Telemetry - not sure what to expect. I've heard MONITOR THE PATIENT, not the monitor. Anything else I should know?

    Also, they mentioned sending me to an EKG course, but not ACLS. Would I be out of line to ask to get my ACLS while working in the Telemetry unit? Thanks for any comments.
    Hello rn2binmay......I take it by your "username" that you have just graduated from college as a nurse, and the job you are just now orienting to is your very first nursing job???

    If so.....it is absolutely essential for every nurse....new or seasoned....to have a Basic EKG course when newly hired on a cardiac unit, or whenever a nurse will be working on a unit that admits a lot of cardiac compromised patients....of course that is my own professional opinion. Once you have mastered the BASIC knowledge of EKG readings, and know exactly what represents what when you note it on the monitor, and feel comfortable with your knowledge as you apply it to your cardiac compromised patients, THEN it would be good timing to take ACLS since that is what you want to do. Having worked cardiac before myself, I think it's a great area of nursing to work in, so I wish you all the best. Don't try to take on too much at once during your orientation.....take it slow enough to grasp what is going on....ask LOTS of questions...and remember it is your patient.....not the machines......that will constantly need your keen assessment abilities. :kiss
  5. by   diddywah
    The tele units I have worked have all required ACLS,however we were not allowed to do anything with the crashing pt until the attending or ED doc came and "told" us what to do...I have ended up in deep doo-doo just doing as I know to do...
    However, take the EKG course, become highly attuned to your pts and just stand back and learn for a while...never fear asking questions...most of us "seasoned" nurses love to teach.......then take ACLS...
  6. by   rn2binmay
    Yes, cheerfuldoer - it is my very first job!! I think you're all right - I need to take the basic EKG course, learn from my preceptor and refine my skills, and then think about taking ACLS later. I agree with KC Chick that ACLS should be required on a cardiac floor, but I think that the standards have been lowered, unfortunately, due to the nursing shortage. Thanks for the responses!
  7. by   New2CVICU
    Congratulations on becoming an RN!

    Youv'e been given great advice. Start with the EKG class. You never know. Some hospitals like the one I work at incorporate your ACLS drugs into the EKG class anyway. Even if they don't you'll at least be able recognize dysrhythmias.

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