Why is lvn job market tough in california?

  1. 0
    All employers ask for experience in their job posting! But that is hardly the case for new graduates!

    I'm a brand new LVN, looking for the first LVN job in California. I have no experience whatsoever as an LVN other than the school internships. Can we use internship experience in lieu of actual LVN experience? I have responded to few LVN job posting with my resume and covering letter with no result so far.

    Are there places where new graduates can work with little or no compensation, and learn all the skills required for a particular LVN position? I welcome and appreciate any inputs or tips. Although I have accumulated huge loan, I'm rather ready and willing to work with little or no compensation, just to gain more experience and master the skills further.


    solicitingyourhelp!
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    The job market in California is tough for all nurses. I would say those who have the best chance to be hired are RNs who have experience in specialized areas.

    Hospitals have decreased their hiring of LVNs.

    There is an overabundance of new grad RNs here who are also willing to work at below (previous) market wages.

    Foreign-educated RN grads are having difficulty getting approved to take the NCLEX-RN so they attempt to go through as an LVN.

    All these factors make it a really tough market out there. However, there are jobs out there. You just have to keep at it as long as you need to. Lots of people I know are using the time to start working on their RN bridge program. The higher your level of education the better are your chances to be hired. Wish I had better news to report!
    dorkiexcici and Meriwhen like this.
  5. 0
    Have you searched places in your area and applied in person? I say this because many smaller facilities wont post online. Go ahead and bring copies of your resume and a pen with copy of license and ID to apply in person. This is how I got my first LVN job one month after getting my license. Have patience and don't dwell on the fact that "it's hard out there." Yeah it is but if you want a job and are flexible with where your first job is you WILL get a job. Good luck
  6. 0
    Quote from ratnamsaranamgachami
    All employers ask for experience in their job posting! But that is hardly the case for new graduates!

    I'm a brand new LVN, looking for the first LVN job in California. I have no experience whatsoever as an LVN other than the school internships. Can we use internship experience in lieu of actual LVN experience? I have responded to few LVN job posting with my resume and covering letter with no result so far.

    Are there places where new graduates can work with little or no compensation, and learn all the skills required for a particular LVN position? I welcome and appreciate any inputs or tips. Although I have accumulated huge loan, I'm rather ready and willing to work with little or no compensation, just to gain more experience and master the skills further.


    solicitingyourhelp!
    Thank you, guys, for the words of encouragement! I haven't tried application in person yet. I probably should. A Home Care Agency responded with invitation for interview in response to my online application. That's about it so far. Thanks again. I truly appreciate!
  7. 0
    Moved to CA Nursing for more response from our CA members.
  8. 0
    Good luck! Job hunting in this economy is tough.

    Keep truckin' at it! A job shall come!
  9. 0
    Is it also really difficult to land a lvn job in nursing homes?
  10. 0
    Quote from misschina
    Is it also really difficult to land a lvn job in nursing homes?
    Nursing homes all over CA have been demanding a minimum of 1 to 3 years of experience before they will even accept your job application.
  11. 0
    so what really is the option for new grad lvn's? ill be finishing up my lvn in a few months, and reading all this is scaring me
  12. 0
    SNFs/LTCs are still definitely among the most viable options for new grad LVNs. But you still need to have flexibility, patience, persistence and a little bit of luck. Don't take for granted whatever opportunities do come up either.

    As a new grad I started at a SNF as an on-call, but continued to look for jobs. Another SNF hired me as an on-call also after only 3 months experience because at the very least I could demonstrate I knew the basics, like med pass, taking orders, transfers, and admissions. Another SNF after that 2 months later. 5 months after getting licensed I was working at 3 different SNFs all on an on-call basis. This meant never having a set schedule and having to be ready to work any shift at the drop of a hat. But between the 3, it balanced out to having full-time hours. Sometimes I'd only get 1 or 2 shifts a week, other weeks I'd work up to 9 shifts. Eventually, almost a year later, a full-time position opened up at one of the facilities and I FINALLY "got a job" in the sense of stability. But I still continue to work on-call at the other 2 facilities. I don't like to burn bridges because I've felt so lucky.

    At the 2 places that I still continue to work on-call, no other new grad has been hired since I started there (almost 2 years), only experienced nurses. Additionally, there is VERY low turnover at these places to begin with. At my full-time (which became my part-time after I started school again), there has been a major turnover in staff in the last year. A lot of new hires, both experienced and new grads have been hired. However, the attrition rate among the new grads was significant. Even though they were allowed to have as many days as they needed for orientation, not a single new grad hired during that period lasted. They either quit from stress/burnout or got fired due to mistakes resulting from cutting corners. Only one new grad, of at least 8 that I can remember off the top of my head being hired (although I'm sure there were more), survived and still works there. All the experienced nurses hired, however, are still there. I would assume that the climate at the different places I work is similar to other SNFs in California, which is another factor in why it's so difficult for new grads to find jobs.


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