What nursing shortage? (rant) - page 2

As some of y'all know, I'm in CA with my girlfriend on my first travel assignment. I'm enjoying my experience, as is my girlfriend, but we are running into a problem. She is a new ADN grad, but... Read More

  1. by   PMHNP10
    Quote from lizz
    Is the car loan currently deliquent? And, if so, is it on her credit report? The only reason I ask is on other threads, people mentioned not getting nursing jobs because of current deliquencies that were on their credit reports. And others said they were asked about years old deliquencies during job interviews, even though they currently have good credit. I'm only basing this on other posts, but it sounded like any late payments could potentially screw up a job application. It might be something to check into.
    Nothing is delinquent because fortunately her father is helping her out until she can find a job.
  2. by   Headhurt
    I'm a little confused.

    Why would having bad credit, or even a late pay on your credit report hinder you from getting a job?? I can sort of see the point if you are applying to handle funds for a bank or some Fortune 500 company. But what does being late on your car payment have to do with your ability to take care of patients??
  3. by   PMHNP10
    Quote from Headhurt
    I'm a little confused.

    Why would having bad credit, or even a late pay on your credit report hinder you from getting a job?? I can sort of see the point if you are applying to handle funds for a bank or some Fortune 500 company. But what does being late on your car payment have to do with your ability to take care of patients??

    Nothing whatsoever, but I've heard that mess about credit hx and jobs before. I'm sure there is a reason, I just don't know it. All I can figure is that if a company gets an idea of how you manage your finances there is a correlation to your reliability as an employee, or something, but I have no clue, really.
  4. by   CapeCodMermaid
    I don't know how all y'all do it out there on the left coast, but here in Massachusetts, you have to be certified as a CNA....I couldn't work as one even though I'm an RNC with more than 20 years experience. Without the certification, we wouldn't hire her...and out here...the shortage is real...we've have 3 full time positions open for more than 6 months...not ONE person has even applied.
  5. by   suzanne4
    That is another thing to consider, most states now require that the employee complete a CNA course. It doesn't even matter if they were a physician in another country, they must have that certificate. Have you considered talking to Human Reasources and ask them the specifics? That may help you.
    Most places do have requirements for different positions.

  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from suzanne4
    That is another thing to consider, most states now require that the employee complete a CNA course. It doesn't even matter if they were a physician in another country, they must have that certificate. Have you considered talking to Human Reasources and ask them the specifics? That may help you.
    Most places do have requirements for different positions.

    I don't know why I didn't think of this before.

    Apparently you do have to be separately certified with fingerprint checks, etc. as a CNA in California.

    http://www.dhs.ca.gov/lnc/cert/CertFacts.pdf

    This might explain the problem.
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 15, '04
  7. by   Nightcrawler
    I am a third semester student at a school here in California. I talked to a member of the class that is graduating in June yesterday, only to hear that she ALREADY has a job. She entered 4th semester with a job waiting for her when she graduates. So there are jobs out there for nurses.

    On the other hand, since the new ratios have been instituted, there has been serious cutbacks in unlicensed personnel. I work for a area hospital as a aid, and the hours dried up on January 1. The hospital that I work for is actually kinda trying to thin the ranks of nursing students because they don't even have hours for the CNA's that are there working full-time. Unfortunately the hospitals have decided that they can not afford to pay for adequate nursing staff, and ancillary staff as well.

    So if hospitals are trying to thin the ranks of student nurses that they are trying to recruit after graduation, and laying off current support staff, they may be a little reticent to hire someone on a 'temporary' basis on the hope that she may pass her boards next time. If she went to school out of state, the hospital has no idea of the quality of the education that she received, and have no way of knowing just how likely she is to pass the boards next time. Don't get me wrong, I don't know your girlfriend, and I'm sure that she will make a fine nurse, but the hospitals don't know her, they don't know that she's going to pass, and hospitals are making financial decisions due to the staffing ratios that are not as beneficial to students as they once were.

    Good luck to you both
  8. by   275Main
    This is off the main topic, but I am confused as to the post about hospitals being reluctant to hire new graduates. I would assume that a hospital that is unable to meet the staffing ratio with core staff then it would need to look to travelers in order to meet the need, which ends up costing the hosptial more than hiring fulltime new employees even when you factor in extras like sign on bonuses, relocation, and benefits. I do not live in california, but the ecomonics of it is that it makes sense to hire more core staff than to rely on temporary staff. I guess I am just confused about the previous post.
  9. by   CapeCodMermaid
    In Massachusetts, you can no longer work as a graduate nurse. You have to have proof that you've passed the state boards before you can be hired. It is so costly to hire a new employee, especially at the hospital here, that the administration would rather hire travelling nurses than take a chance on hiring someone who might not even pass the boards. And in many cases, it's a travelling/agency nurse or no one. The facility I work in has had 4 open nursing positions for a year with hardly any responses to our help wanted ads.
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from 275Main
    This is off the main topic, but I am confused as to the post about hospitals being reluctant to hire new graduates.
    I thought the post was clear and actually explained a lot. The hospitals aren't reluctant to hire new RN graduates. At my California school, new grads typically get two to three job offers.

    I believe the previous poster was referring to cutbacks in hiring nursing students who are not close to graduation and who are NOT yet RNs, as well other support staff, to save money for people who ARE nursing school graduates and licensed RNs.

    Big difference. :spin:
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Mar 19, '04
  11. by   suzanne4
    If you stop to think of it, a hospital is investing in an orientation for you, usually about three months for a new grad, minimum. What happens if they invest the three months and then you don't pass your boards? They are then out the money. Unfortunately, they learned the hard way................

    Back in the old days when I took my boards, they were only given twice a year, over two days, and then it took at least 8 weeks to find out if you passed. Now, you are able to take your exam at any time when you finish, and get your results right away, so why should they not require you to have your license first? As I have stated many, many times before, the exam covers all aspects of nursing, you will be only working on one unit. So working for a few months first, really isn't going to improve your skills base for the exam.


    Just my opinion.......................
  12. by   texan
    Keep in mind that just because there is a posting for a job doesnt mean there is an actual job open. A company I worked for kept postings open in case they recieved funds and could afford a new position. So we had resumes coming in everyday for positions that did not exist. Other places keep staple jobs (CNAs, RNs) posted in case they have people leave.
  13. by   Town & Country
    Nothing whatsoever, but I've heard that mess about credit hx and jobs before. I'm sure there is a reason, I just don't know it. All I can figure is that if a company gets an idea of how you manage your finances there is a correlation to your reliability as an employee, or something, but I have no clue, really.
    That's the biggest load of B.S. I've ever seen. They're doing it here in Kentucky, also.....it's like they are DESPERATELY looking for any reason to turn you down.......it's all phoney recruiting.
    It's all B.S.
    The hospital right down the road won't hire me, even though I am listed with HR as "eligible for rehire."
    They're got rid of the CNAs (they had two CNAs for at least 30 patients on a busy med/surg floor), the the nurses are doing what they call "primary care."

    *^%$)!!!

    All THAT means is that the hospital is trying to $ave money but NOT HIRING CNAs. So, in addition to all their other duties, the RNs have all the primary care, too, the I & Os, the transfers, the "I want a glass of water", the "I want my pillow fluffed," on and on......God it makes me SICK!
    :angryfire

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