ADN or BSN?

  1. Hi guys! First question I've written on here. I'm from San Francisco CA, I am a medical assistant that wants to be a nurse practitioner soon. Unfortunately the cost of living is way too expensive and I'm thinking of moving to Nevada to start my nursing career path. I'm stumped on whether to do ADN or BSN? Do I HAVE to do the ADN? I feel like it's such a waste of 2 years. I just really need advice on how to make the most of my time and money. Im 24 and being a nurse has been my dream and I just want to make sure I'm going about this the right way. I appreciate any advice. Thank you!
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  2. Visit sis93lisa profile page

    About sis93lisa

    Joined: Jan '18; Posts: 2
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    8 Comments

  3. by   Stepper
    If you would benefit from earning nurse salary sooner (have children, single parent ect), then ADN initially may be a good option. There are so many online BSN programs- you could roll right into one, but be working as RN. You may also receive financial help from your hiring institution for BSN.
  4. by   sis93lisa
    Okay thank you! I would rather jump into the BSN, i just want to make sure that i don't have to be an RN first. I've read a ton of articles and its a little confusing.
  5. by   Bob Loblaw
    Unless you live in an area where they require BSN's, most places I've been are paying sign on bonus for a breathing body with an RN from anywhere. I would suggest ADN (cheaper from the get go) and then BSN online- most places I've been have an "arrangement" for tuition with an online school, I see Grand Canyon University listed in the break rooms with a facility POC at most the places I've worked. So you get working sooner with alot less out of pocket. And then I've seen people sign the contract that they would get a BSN after so long at the facility and then blow right past the date with nothing happening to them. Last thing you want is a large student debt to get the same job that someone who only payed a couple thousand from the local CC- trust me I hear the grumbling about student loan debt from the 4 year private school RN's. Dont saddle yourself with debt unnecessarily. An RN is an RN- you get paid for the license.
  6. by   Neo Soldier
    I am pretty much echoing what Bob Loblaw said. An ADN program is a two year program. You qualify to take the NCLEX and if/when you pass, you become an RN. Same pay as one with a BSN. While you work as an RN with an ADN, you can take your BSN online. University of texas at arlington offers a 9 month program for 9 thousand. It's an accredited program and I know an RN where I work who did it that way.

    If you don't have to, don't take on an unnecessary debt. ADN programs cost lik 5000-6000 for the entire length of the program (this is in southern california) and if you get financial aid, it's free. BSN programs is some places cost as high as 120k (West coast university) or 60k (Azusa pacific).

    With an ADN you start working sooner and you can still get your BSN at your own time.
  7. by   akulahawkRN
    With all the prerequisites, both ADN and BSN programs are essentially the same length, when you actually start from day one of your first prerequisite course to graduation. This is because once you enter the formal program, they're both about 2 years (4 Semesters, sometimes 5 Semesters) in length. It also takes about 2 years of study to get through all the typical lower division gen ed and all the prerequisites.

    So what I suggest is that you make sure you have all your prerequisites done and all your LDGE done so you can either graduate upon completing an ADN course or you can enter a BSN program. What this means in the end is that you have to look at what you can afford and what's usually most affordable is to do the LDGE and prerequisites at the Junior College level and then apply EVERYWHERE that you possibly qualify to attend. Once you're accepted somewhere, wait a short time to see if you have other acceptance letters, and then choose where to go. If you are accepted to a BSN program and an ADN program, look at what you can afford. There are often grants, loans, and other programs (like tuition waivers) that can sometimes dramatically lower the cost to you so look at that stuff as you look at where to go so you can make a very informed choice as to which program you should attend.

    If you're looking for BSN and all you can afford is ADN, that's fine. Do that and take BSN coursework later. Then decide if you want to continue past that.
  8. by   futureRN_22
    Quote from Bob Loblaw
    Unless you live in an area where they require BSN's, most places I've been are paying sign on bonus for a breathing body with an RN from anywhere. I would suggest ADN (cheaper from the get go) and then BSN online- most places I've been have an "arrangement" for tuition with an online school, I see Grand Canyon University listed in the break rooms with a facility POC at most the places I've worked. So you get working sooner with alot less out of pocket. And then I've seen people sign the contract that they would get a BSN after so long at the facility and then blow right past the date with nothing happening to them. Last thing you want is a large student debt to get the same job that someone who only payed a couple thousand from the local CC- trust me I hear the grumbling about student loan debt from the 4 year private school RN's. Dont saddle yourself with debt unnecessarily. An RN is an RN- you get paid for the license.
    I'm new to this forum I couldn't send you PM!!

    Can you please tell me which hospital are you talking about? I really wanna move to California and start my RN to bsn there.
  9. by   FullGlass
    If you are able to go straight into a BSN program, then do so and just get it over with. A BSN will give you a leg up on your job search as a new grad. However, if you are unable to do so at this time, the ADN is a fine option, but do an RN to BSN program as soon as you can. Many employers will pay for that part.

    Good luck.
  10. by   futureRN_22
    Quote from FullGlass
    If you are able to go straight into a BSN program, then do so and just get it over with. A BSN will give you a leg up on your job search as a new grad. However, if you are unable to do so at this time, the ADN is a fine option, but do an RN to BSN program as soon as you can. Many employers will pay for that part.

    Good luck.
    Do many employers hire ADN nurses???

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