Medical Assistants in the office - page 6

This is probably going to open a can of worms.............but how do you all feel about replacing nurses in the office setting with Medical Assistants? How (if at all) do you feel it affects patient... Read More

  1. by   Dsulyma
    Im a Medical Assistant and Phlebotomist. I would just like to say that I dont think I am a Nurse nor will I introduce myself as one. I am very proud of being an RMA. The nurses in my department that I work for now are very greatful that I am helping them any way I can. I am NOT looking to take there job or there title. The nurses I work for now are very secure with themselves and dont complain about anything. If there is something that they would like to teach me, then I am more than willing to learn. We learn from each other. There were times that I knew something and they didnt. I would inform them of new things and they appreciated it.

    Some nurses shouldnt think that they are all high and mighty because they have a higher title. I have worked with some really incompetent nurses in the past. You got good ones and you got bad ones.

    Whenever a patient asks me what my title is, I tell them that I am a medical assistant. Its not like I just walked off the street and started to work there. I worked for my certification and I get the respect for it. Even the doctors I work for dont look down at me. I am there to help everyone.
  2. by   LadyFree28
    In the healthcare profession, there is a lot of people from the top to the "hired help" that act high and mighty, mainly from their lack of confidentce. It's been called "nurses eating their young" and I too have worked with people who have been hight and mighty, but we have had an exchange on educational experiences as well. I have been an UAP for seven years (2 years of internship 5 years acute care), and I decided to go to nursing school. I got treatment just the same or worse at times until I showed my expertise as a "Nursing Assistant" (even one instructor has attempted to "eat" myself and several others who have experiennce, as well as ones who do not!!) and what educational additons and showed myself to be competent and compassionate for what I want to do and have done for many years.

    What I am trying to say is that If you know your skills and you care about who you care for-the patient-that's what matters, nothing else.
  3. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    I know this is an old post, but here's my 2 cents:

    I am a medical assistant as well. I am not working, as I am going to a local cc to get my RN.

    As a CMA, the only "RN" at any place I worked was the supervisor. Some places only had another CMA as a supervisor.

    We were referred to as "nurses" because we "nursed", not because we were RN's. If asked by patients, I would explain to them I was a medical assistant, not a nurse.

    I gave up trying to explain this to my lil' one though....."Mommie, when you were a nurse...." hahahahaha

    I guess I will be offended with a MA being called nurse when I get to where I will be the RN.

    As for asking to see vials, that is not really offensive...just cautious.

    I started hemorraging after my lil' one was born. Some guy came towards my leg with a syringe. I put my arm up, and stop his hand in mid air to ask what he was about to give me. .....CAUTIOUS...... ty
  4. by   stbernardclub
    Having been in both jobs...m.a and r.n, actually was a lab tech also, but thats another story, lol, I never called myself a nurse nor do I remember our Dr calling me a nurse ( before I was a nurse). If a nurse asked to see a vial, which by the way I usually did not handle because our nurses drawn up their own meds and gave them, I would not be offended. What if it was the wrong vial?? You would be real thankful someone caught that now wouldn't you. Just as when I ran labs for the Dr after I became a lab tech, I would always want to see the order myself, I would not go by what the nurse said. Mistakes happen, and I would like to make sure they do not.Basically, just do the job your supposed to be doing. Do not push your work on someone else.Why call yourself a nurse and take on more responsibilities than your being paid for. No one person is better than another.
  5. by   curleysue
    Wow this is a mess. I totally respect the nurses and what they have gone through with schooling to have all that knowledge and skills, its an honor to be able to call themselves "NURSES". MA's and CMA, CNA's they all do their work and what they have been trained to do and should not go beyond their scope of practice and not let patients get by with calling them the "nurse". They should audomatically correct them and say "oh I am a medical assistant, not the nurse". I think that is the appropriate way. And doctors should be taught to recognize the difference and refer to them in the correct way.

    I think this is a very important issue. When you go to the doctor I automatically assume that person that admits me and gets info from me is a nurse however these days that has changed. All nurses, MA's, CNA, and CMA's should wear a badge stating their correct position. It would be nice for the patients to note who they are talking to and what questions to ask whom. For instance when the person admiting me asks about my meds I list them off with dosages and such and then is amazes me that they start to say and you take that med for? What?! You don't know. That makes me uncomfortable.

    But really I am not trying to belittle anyone. I myself am a student nurse, CNA, and when I worked in the hospital and a patient called me nurse, I automatically said, "no I am the nurse's aid, would you like me to get the nurse or can I help you?" As long as it is in my scope of practice, it was okay for me to do. I think everyone should study their scope of practice and abide by it.

    Anyways, I don't want to get anyone mad at me and hope I didn't say anything offending. I just like the idea of people wearing badges saying their title at all times and just practicing within what they have been trained and certified to do.
  6. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from curleysue
    Wow this is a mess. I totally respect the nurses and what they have gone through with schooling to have all that knowledge and skills, its an honor to be able to call themselves "NURSES". MA's and CMA, CNA's they all do their work and what they have been trained to do and should not go beyond their scope of practice and not let patients get by with calling them the "nurse". They should audomatically correct them and say "oh I am a medical assistant, not the nurse". I think that is the appropriate way. And doctors should be taught to recognize the difference and refer to them in the correct way.

    I think this is a very important issue. When you go to the doctor I automatically assume that person that admits me and gets info from me is a nurse however these days that has changed. All nurses, MA's, CNA, and CMA's should wear a badge stating their correct position. It would be nice for the patients to note who they are talking to and what questions to ask whom. For instance when the person admiting me asks about my meds I list them off with dosages and such and then is amazes me that they start to say and you take that med for? What?! You don't know. That makes me uncomfortable.

    But really I am not trying to belittle anyone. I myself am a student nurse, CNA, and when I worked in the hospital and a patient called me nurse, I automatically said, "no I am the nurse's aid, would you like me to get the nurse or can I help you?" As long as it is in my scope of practice, it was okay for me to do. I think everyone should study their scope of practice and abide by it.

    Anyways, I don't want to get anyone mad at me and hope I didn't say anything offending. I just like the idea of people wearing badges saying their title at all times and just practicing within what they have been trained and certified to do.

    That's funny, after being a Dr.'s office medical assistant, I assume most are MA's not RN's nowadays. As a pt., I asked a "nurse" if she was a medical assistant, and she said, "No, I am an RN." oops :chuckle Good thing she and I got along well.
  7. by   alintanurse
    I worked at a clinic where the MA's far out numbered the licensed nurses. They did refer to themselves as nurses to the pts. Most of them had attitudes as though they were superior to the licensed staff. The manager encouraged this behavior. I left when I was told by the nurse manager that the MA's were working under the RNs license--making the RN responsible for any error the MA might make. Too dangerous for me!
  8. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from alintanurse
    I worked at a clinic where the MA's far out numbered the licensed nurses. They did refer to themselves as nurses to the pts. Most of them had attitudes as though they were superior to the licensed staff. The manager encouraged this behavior. I left when I was told by the nurse manager that the MA's were working under the RNs license--making the RN responsible for any error the MA might make. Too dangerous for me!

    WHAT???? As far as I know MA's work under the Dr.'s supervision, not the RN's.

    What crap.....the management you had must have been a MA at one time, or was never accepted into nursing school.
  9. by   alintanurse
    I was told by the nurse manager (who was an RN) that overseeing the proper administration /dose of IZ's along with other functions performed by the MA's fell under the RN's license. I did not want to be responsible for any errors that might occur.
  10. by   Standardethics
    Here, medical assistants can pretty much walk in off the street and be hired. I am not opposed to paraprofessionals doing a great many things if they have been properly trained and are properly supervised. However, that is not the case. Comments made by medical assistants indicate that, at least one, doesn't question that she should not be assisting in an OR. No, dear, you may be able to "do" "all that stuff" but you do not know why you are doing it, nor what the results might indicate. Ignorance is dangerous. I was, and remain, a patient advocate. I was also a medical paraprofessional. It's a good thing that close tabs were kept on all of us, as we did not know what we did not know. In the situation where I worked, which was unique, there was constant and direct communication and interaction between licensed medical professionals and the paraprofessionals - not email.

    No one but a licensed R.N. should be referred to as such. And, medical assistants who are registered or licensed medical assistants should be noted as such - as another poster stated - people should be labeled. I also advocate for abandoning the first name business. This is "Tiffany." "Tiffany" just happens to be the leading physician, but you'd never know it - a bit of an exaggeration, but "Sharon," unless she states this is nurse - meaning R.N. "Sharon" - could be anyone.

    The BSN nurses and MS nurses should have all rights and privileges afforded their investment, intelligence and successful completion of their education, as should two-year RNs, medical assistants who are certified/registered.
  11. by   klone
    This is a ten year old thread.
  12. by   Standardethics
    And an important one.
  13. by   mohs rn
    Well said! Amen!!

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