BSN vs. RN Salary - page 3

Hi! I got a lot of information about RN salaries from another thread. What it seems to be, is that around the Bham area, starting salaries are at about $18/hr. My question is, to any of you that... Read More

  1. Visit  NightAngelle profile page
    12
    I'm gonna take heat for this post...but it is all good...

    I've been an ADN for eleven years. I've seen the threads on allnurses.com for years debating the validity of ADN vs. BSN. And for a long time, I've sided with the ADNs regarding "What's a BSN got to do with it?" Trust me, I shared that frustration.

    I am enrolled in a RN-BSN program at Auburn University-Montgomery. The three semester program has a cute nickname..."Perspective Transformation Journey." And perspective changing it has been. Earlier, a poster mentioned that other "professions" require at best, a Bachelor's degree for entry level practice. That being said, in order to be taken seriously as a profession, we need to up the ante on our educational requirements to gain that said respect. It has nothing to do with "I've been a manager with my Associate's degree, and that's where I'm gonna stick it" mentality, or "I know LPNs that run circles around some of the RNs on our unit." Although this may be true, it does not hold weight for us as a PROFESSION.

    My professor made a profound statement in class one day.."Anyone can train a monkey to be a nurse. But monkeys do not have multiple level critical thinking skils." Now, that being said, I reiterate I've been an ADN for eleven years. I am highly intelligent, and very technically sound, and can see sh*t hitting the fan hours before it comes (intuition). However, in just ONE SEMESTER, my horizons have been broadened. Just what does it mean to be a "nurse"? Most people describe us as "caring, compassionate, devoted, loving, blah, blah blah...". But who ever describes a nurse CONSISTENTLY as SMART, EDUCATED, etc...and why is it that when we show promise to people like our patients, they ask us why we didn't go to MEDICAL school??? One day, when we gain respect as a profession, our patients will say..."Wow..you are something else. NO WONDER YOU BECAME A NURSE."

    The professional nurse does more than manage and think critically. He/she gives back to their community, they teach, they participate in forward moving legislation for our field, they contribute to evidence-based research, they participate ACTIVELY in their professional organizations, and they think OUTSIDE the box. If you are happy with being an ADN, and the shoe fits, by all means wear it. I've worn those shoes for ELEVEN YEARS. But I pat myself on the back for being open-minded and giving myself a chance to be a more well-rounded nurse who wants to be taken as seriously as she takes herself.

    Check out the BSN in 10 initiative. Google it. People, there is a reason the Magnet movement exists. And it ain't all about YOU. It's about nursing- as a profession! When we stop looking at the BSN as a stepping stone to advanced practice nursing, and more like progression of our profession, our pay rates will change, our level or respect will change, we will get the legislation we need to end the nursing shortage, and maybe, just MAYBE, those little "naughty nurse outfits" will slowly fade into oblivion because we will be taken MORE SERIOUSLY!!
    Dazglue, mznelly, bamagirl14, and 9 others like this.
  2. Visit  gking2010 profile page
    0
    Well in the hospital setting nurses with a BSN can become a manager if they wanted after a few years of staff nursing. I really dont see a difference because we all take the same exam. I mean why dont we just be a BSN after the nclex. I know folks from a BSN program that didn't even pass their exam yet. My school passing rates are better than most 4 year colleges. I chose the ADN route so that i could make money and then go back if I choose to.
  3. Visit  indreams84 profile page
    0
    Quote from sosiouxme
    An RN with only the "ADN" (which, by the way, is not considered a college degree) would make as much as someone with a BSN only if they hold the same position. However, most BSN's are hired at higher levels than the non-degreed RN's to begin with. With the ADN - you will almost never advance to the same level as someone with a BSN, or better, a Master's, can achieve.

    ADN= associate DEGREE nursing from two year COLLEGE.....and yes, actually our ICU hires and pays BSN and ADNs equally. Perhaps you may advance eventually, but by the time you can, the ADN can earn their BSN@home for a fraction of the cost.....when I graduate this December from an ADN ill have ZERO student debt and am starting my BSN while getting an ICU job. Can you say the same?
    Last edit by tnbutterfly on Aug 12, '10 : Reason: Inflammatory
  4. Visit  denit1am profile page
    0
    This forum is ridiculous, RN vs BSN. I am going into an accelerated program at an community college in Michigan that happens to hold to highest board pass rate in the state of Michigan, and that is competing with MSU and UofM. I also know from holding a bachelors degree in Cardiac Rehab, most of the classes you take to obtain your degree are a joke. I will eventually get my BSN just because I know its something to put on a resume when another position opens with higher pay. I know of bridge programs offered only have a couple nursing courses, but I also know of associate nursing programs that don't require Pathophisiology as a prerequisite. I guess choosing a school and the way you spend your time learning to material and being successful at taking the boards is more important than arguing over RN vs BSN, becuase at the end you all hold the same title RN.
  5. Visit  ParaTuGloria profile page
    0
    Wow...I've been following the thread. You really blew me away with this post...Thank you...
    It is important to think about nursing as a profession and how we can contribute to its advancement... I wish you all success. Thanks again for your words of wisdom.


    Quote from NightAngelle
    I'm gonna take heat for this post...but it is all good...

    I've been an ADN for eleven years. I've seen the threads on allnurses.com for years debating the validity of ADN vs. BSN. And for a long time, I've sided with the ADNs regarding "What's a BSN got to do with it?" Trust me, I shared that frustration.

    I am enrolled in a RN-BSN program at Auburn University-Montgomery. The three semester program has a cute nickname..."Perspective Transformation Journey." And perspective changing it has been. Earlier, a poster mentioned that other "professions" require at best, a Bachelor's degree for entry level practice. That being said, in order to be taken seriously as a profession, we need to up the ante on our educational requirements to gain that said respect. It has nothing to do with "I've been a manager with my Associate's degree, and that's where I'm gonna stick it" mentality, or "I know LPNs that run circles around some of the RNs on our unit." Although this may be true, it does not hold weight for us as a PROFESSION.

    My professor made a profound statement in class one day.."Anyone can train a monkey to be a nurse. But monkeys do not have multiple level critical thinking skils." Now, that being said, I reiterate I've been an ADN for eleven years. I am highly intelligent, and very technically sound, and can see sh*t hitting the fan hours before it comes (intuition). However, in just ONE SEMESTER, my horizons have been broadened. Just what does it mean to be a "nurse"? Most people describe us as "caring, compassionate, devoted, loving, blah, blah blah...". But who ever describes a nurse CONSISTENTLY as SMART, EDUCATED, etc...and why is it that when we show promise to people like our patients, they ask us why we didn't go to MEDICAL school??? One day, when we gain respect as a profession, our patients will say..."Wow..you are something else. NO WONDER YOU BECAME A NURSE."

    The professional nurse does more than manage and think critically. He/she gives back to their community, they teach, they participate in forward moving legislation for our field, they contribute to evidence-based research, they participate ACTIVELY in their professional organizations, and they think OUTSIDE the box. If you are happy with being an ADN, and the shoe fits, by all means wear it. I've worn those shoes for ELEVEN YEARS. But I pat myself on the back for being open-minded and giving myself a chance to be a more well-rounded nurse who wants to be taken as seriously as she takes herself.

    Check out the BSN in 10 initiative. Google it. People, there is a reason the Magnet movement exists. And it ain't all about YOU. It's about nursing- as a profession! When we stop looking at the BSN as a stepping stone to advanced practice nursing, and more like progression of our profession, our pay rates will change, our level or respect will change, we will get the legislation we need to end the nursing shortage, and maybe, just MAYBE, those little "naughty nurse outfits" will slowly fade into oblivion because we will be taken MORE SERIOUSLY!!
  6. Visit  ten0883 profile page
    2
    I've been reading the thread and I've been on the fence until I read this post. I am an LVN that is currently enrolled in an LVN to BSN program in Houston. I have been an LVN since 2005 but I realized that I could not actualize all my dreams (like buying a house) without furthering my education.

    I am not even going to open up the can of worms about LVNs because that is not what this thread is about. I encourage and commend anyone that goes to back school. Whether it is for LVN, ADN, BSN, MSN, or even APN. The common denominator here is the word NURSE. We ALL, regardless of our station (rank) on the unit provide and INVALUABLE service that is beyond measure. No school can teach us how to be compassionate, critical thinkers, and fierce advocates for our patients. Those are the things that make a good nurse regardless of degree.

    Now, with that being said, I must say that being in BSN school for even one semester is an eye opener. We must be proactive and advocate for higher standards in our profession. This is not to snuff anyone out, but to secure our economic futures and those of nurses to come. If we are to be taken more serious as a profession then we must come to the table with a large and diverse body of knowledge. A minimum standard of education should be enforced. There is a reason why MAGNET exists in the 1st place. It is not to exclude anyone but it is a statement to that hospital's consumers that they operate with a higher level of service, broader clinical insight, and with forward moving professionals.

    I am sorry if anyone takes offense. Just my little opinion.





    Quote from NightAngelle
    I'm gonna take heat for this post...but it is all good...

    I've been an ADN for eleven years. I've seen the threads on allnurses.com for years debating the validity of ADN vs. BSN. And for a long time, I've sided with the ADNs regarding "What's a BSN got to do with it?" Trust me, I shared that frustration.

    I am enrolled in a RN-BSN program at Auburn University-Montgomery. The three semester program has a cute nickname..."Perspective Transformation Journey." And perspective changing it has been. Earlier, a poster mentioned that other "professions" require at best, a Bachelor's degree for entry level practice. That being said, in order to be taken seriously as a profession, we need to up the ante on our educational requirements to gain that said respect. It has nothing to do with "I've been a manager with my Associate's degree, and that's where I'm gonna stick it" mentality, or "I know LPNs that run circles around some of the RNs on our unit." Although this may be true, it does not hold weight for us as a PROFESSION.

    My professor made a profound statement in class one day.."Anyone can train a monkey to be a nurse. But monkeys do not have multiple level critical thinking skils." Now, that being said, I reiterate I've been an ADN for eleven years. I am highly intelligent, and very technically sound, and can see sh*t hitting the fan hours before it comes (intuition). However, in just ONE SEMESTER, my horizons have been broadened. Just what does it mean to be a "nurse"? Most people describe us as "caring, compassionate, devoted, loving, blah, blah blah...". But who ever describes a nurse CONSISTENTLY as SMART, EDUCATED, etc...and why is it that when we show promise to people like our patients, they ask us why we didn't go to MEDICAL school??? One day, when we gain respect as a profession, our patients will say..."Wow..you are something else. NO WONDER YOU BECAME A NURSE."

    The professional nurse does more than manage and think critically. He/she gives back to their community, they teach, they participate in forward moving legislation for our field, they contribute to evidence-based research, they participate ACTIVELY in their professional organizations, and they think OUTSIDE the box. If you are happy with being an ADN, and the shoe fits, by all means wear it. I've worn those shoes for ELEVEN YEARS. But I pat myself on the back for being open-minded and giving myself a chance to be a more well-rounded nurse who wants to be taken as seriously as she takes herself.

    Check out the BSN in 10 initiative. Google it. People, there is a reason the Magnet movement exists. And it ain't all about YOU. It's about nursing- as a profession! When we stop looking at the BSN as a stepping stone to advanced practice nursing, and more like progression of our profession, our pay rates will change, our level or respect will change, we will get the legislation we need to end the nursing shortage, and maybe, just MAYBE, those little "naughty nurse outfits" will slowly fade into oblivion because we will be taken MORE SERIOUSLY!!
    bamagirl14 and lindarn like this.
  7. Visit  SteveNAU profile page
    0
    .....
    Last edit by SteveNAU on Dec 23, '10
  8. Visit  mustangrachel00 profile page
    0
    Unfortuntalely there is no difference in pay. We all take the same test therefore we all get the same pay. What they typically will pay for is experience. Most places will pay about 3% of the base rate.That's the standard in B'ham and Montgomery. Remember both places have had an influx of nurses because of hospital closures, so the competition for jobs is great and they aren't great paying jobs right now. Just remember, it will change.
    Rachel
  9. Visit  God's Creation profile page
    2
    My goodness, we are supposed to take care of ill patients not to show them our Nursing Degree in a frame every time they came to the hospital, that's the reason we become nurses, to take good care of a human being no matter what if you have an ADN, BSN, MSN or a PhD or the President's sign in the Diploma. If you want become a Nurse just for a good salary or a great position behind a desk, I don't think that you are choosing the right job.
  10. Visit  palmer1956 profile page
    2
    I graduated from an accredited university with an Associates degree. There was no difference in my pay and my co-workers who graduated with a Bachelors degree.

    Same test, same job, same pay. If something different is being practiced, then Nursing management is promoting the same unfair treatment women experience in male dominated jobs.

    If Nursing wants to be like a profession, there should be one standard path. For example, there is only one path to be a CPA; why not a RN?
    pirello77 and lindarn like this.
  11. Visit  NightAngelle profile page
    1
    Quote from Bloop23
    do and under emphasize theory.

    In terms of management, BSN and MSN nurses just sound better on paper. Management is about leadership and your ability to make sound decisions, not necessarily related to level of education. However, graduate degrees demonstrate your ability in higher level thinking which is valuable as you strategize to make your unit or hospital (if your an executive) run as efficiently as possible.
    I agree with you wholeheartedly in the fact that management and leadership skills either inborn or acquired. Great managers have been found on the ADN level with appropriate instruction in management and leadership. Great managers have been found on the MSN/PhD level with the appropriate education. But not everyone makes a great manager. Alphabet soup doesn't make you a leader; the point I was trying to make earlier is that there is a bigger picture to be seen here. It is not solely about management, and who get to be "the leader". There is so much more to professional nursing...it is not an attitude, nor is it a title. Which leads me to my next point, which I will address in the next post. (sorry, I can't multi-quote just yet)..
    ready2forsuccess likes this.
  12. Visit  NightAngelle profile page
    0
    Quote from denit1am
    this forum is ridiculous, rn vs bsn. i am going into an accelerated program at an community college in michigan that happens to hold to highest board pass rate in the state of michigan, and that is competing with msu and uofm. i also know from holding a bachelors degree in cardiac rehab, most of the classes you take to obtain your degree are a joke. i will eventually get my bsn just because i know its something to put on a resume when another position opens with higher pay. i know of bridge programs offered only have a couple nursing courses, but i also know of associate nursing programs that don't require pathophisiology as a prerequisite. i guess choosing a school and the way you spend your time learning to material and being successful at taking the boards is more important than arguing over rn vs bsn, becuase at the end you all hold the same title rn.
    denit1am, i respectfully disagree with you for a few reasons. high pass rate, much like holding a bsn, has nothing to do with the caliber of nurse the school produces. in my humble opinion, in the same light, i know nurses who have taken several tries to pass the nclex and made phenomenal nurses, yet i also know nurses who took the nclex and passed it on the first try who i wouldn't let care for my dog. my schools pass rate was not the highest in the state, but it was high, and i got out of my education what i was willing to put in. that being said, it doesn't sound like you will be putting a lot into your program of bsn study, as you see it as a "resume booster". i sincerely hope, for the love of nursing, that you do not consider your hard earned nursing education on the baccalaureate level a "joke" or a "resume pearl".

    i don't consider this discussion an argument. this is an enlightening conversation for those intelligent enough to see it as such. calling other people's comments idiotic as one poster did earlier in the thread makes us look like the feminine hormonal pot of gossipmongers and malicious young-eating heiffers the media plays us out to be at times. instead of helping each other to understand things, we disagree disagreeably. and the world is watching. those who take offense to discussions like these have room for growth. people who see their bsn's as a way to get paid more kinda worry me. actually, i will take it one step further...i pray for them, because it is this attitude that has placed us in a position of professional stagnancy. i used to have the same attitude you had...so i can also only pray that you find a bsn program that has dedicated, professional professors who have a passion for the profession, instead of the attitude that they just need to "pass folks along that just want some more pay".

    i am going back to school for my msn not because i want to get more pay...i have done the bedside thing for 11 years, and shift work is hard on my body. i look forward to the challenge, and i want to motivate bsns to keep going. there is no harm in that. but no one...and i mean no one...should do something without reason. when you return for your bsn, then, please come up with a better reason than "it looks good on my resume." just saying. no disrespect intended.
  13. Visit  cpl_dvldog profile page
    1
    For most professions you are paid by the amount of education it took to get that job. That is why engineers, lawyers, doctors, CPA's and such make more money, for the most part, than someone with an Associates Degree in Criminal Justice. The majority of the population considers a Community College as just an extension of high school, or a prep school to get you ready to go to college.

    When you can take a new high school graduate and have them working as an RN in 5 semesters it is hard to convince the public that we are professionals. I am starting my 5th, and last, semester of my ADN in Jan. and I have a couple of people in my class that are still 19 years old. Mentally and emotionally they are still kids. They show it in their actions and conversations.

    I am applying to a BSN program as soon as I pass the N-CLEX. I am doing this for a couple of reasons; I believe it will help me in the long run, and I will need it to make more money. Some hospitals will not hire an ADN, and some that do restrict your pay. Did I get into nursing for the money? I will admit that played a very large part in it. Anyone that says they didn't get into nursing for the money is not being honest. I know of no one that would go through nursing school and take on the responsibilties nurses have for $10 an hour. So money does play a part.
    stash11 likes this.

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