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Would I lose a lot of time from AA to ASN? I am lost

Nurses   (1,055 Views 5 Comments)
by JohnnyT JohnnyT (New Member) New Member

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Hello everyone,

I got my AA last year and was planning on going into engineering from a 4 year college but realized that I want to be an RN instead. I just realized that the school that I got my AA from also offer an ASN. Do you think that it would take me another 2 years to be a RN? and would my AA be wasted? What should I do to be an RN asap? Thank you, Johnny

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trite but true....no education is ever wasted.......it may take you another two years, but not full time....since the nursing courses need to be taken in sequence...but some of the courses will apply, good luck

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Tweety has 28 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

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Welcome to Allnurses!! Your AA would not be wasted. Many of those courses are required for the ADN as well. But yes, the ADN will take you another two years, but you should have a lot of the pre-reqs and coreqs done already. Good luck!

Perhaps there's a BSN program you can get into. That would take another two years as well. If you do go ADN, you can go ADN to BSN and those AA courses will come in handy then as well.

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When I get my RN, I will receive two Associate Degrees...one that is basically a college-transfer AAS (that is most-likely what you have), and an ADN.

There is a HUGE benefit to getting that as I have discovered it significantly will decrease the amount of general study pre-reqs that I will have to get for my BSN...I'm talking about shaving an entire year or more off the program.

I only have to take one or two classes when I start my BSN that are specific to the University. I have discovered that if you go in-state, many colleges, if you have an Associate Degree in General Studies from a CC, will consider your general education requirements filled...but this is ONLY if you have an AAS...otherwise they do a course-by-course transfer. Many in-state universities are going to that to encourage college-transfer applicants, as well as to make the process easier. I think they call it an "articulation agreement"...these are very, very common nowadays.

Make sure they are giving you credit for those gen-ed classes. I looked at the University of Kentucky program for a BSN, and they WOULD NOT except more than 66 hours from a CC...which means that I would have to take my upper-level BSN courses there, and they would require me to take ALL of the gen-ed classes over again just to take them from their school.

That was not in the stratosphere of being competitive with other schools...so they were immediately marked off my list. That would have taken an additional 4 YEARS to get a BSN....Nope...no thanks!

Things like that are usually not addressed on the websites of these schools, you have to call and talk to an advisor to find out how they will handle it.

If you are getting financial aid...you do run the risk of tapping your sources out, because they only let you take so many hours before they cut you off for grants and some loans b/c after a certain point, you need to complete your first Bachelor degree...so reducing the hours taken can make the difference between taking out high-interest loans vs not.

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