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Will I get a job?!

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Alleydog Alleydog (New) New

Long story short, I moved to Ohio from out of state about three years ago. I have not been able to find a job in my field (education) mainly due to the lack of jobs. I haven't even been able to get an interview. I have ten years of experience, great references, and a masters degree, but the truth is they just don't need teachers in my field.

I've decided to put my 'free time ' (unemployment) to good use and continue my education. I've been told that I'll 'definitely' find a job with a bsn.

I've been accepted into a bsn program (although I need two semesters worth of prerequisites) and my question is: What is the job market like for nurses? Is it flooded? Are there nursing jobs out there or am I getting into another situation where I'm not needed?

please advise !!!!! I want to work!

OUxPhys, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology. Has 4 years experience.

Depends. What part of Ohio did you move to? Columbus and Cleveland have a lot of nursing schools so the market is kind of saturated. My advice to you is to get a job as an aide, that way you are in the system. A lot of hospitals will hire internally first before they post positions to external applicants.

kinbari08, BSN

Specializes in Pediatric OR Nursing. Has 7 years experience.

It does depend on where in Ohio you are. I'm from Dayton and with tons of nursing schools all over churning out tons of new grads each semester, the market there is overly saturated. I have a BSN myself and had to move out of state for my first job. It's in the specialty I want so I'm happy but not everyone can move. If you can, get a part time job as an aide or unit clerk at a local hospital. They will be more likely to hire you internally than externally when you graduate.

Mmm, new grad BSNs around here get LTC or SNF jobs. Ok, yeah, a few (and I do mean a choice FEW) get hospital positions, but it's really hard. What I'm saying is that new grad BSN nad ASN RNs start out on the same footing. ASNs actually have more and better clinical experience. So, if you want to get going on something, start with your ASN and after that, go back for another yr and get your BSN!:cat:

OUxPhys, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology. Has 4 years experience.

How do ASN's have a better clinical experience? Im going for my BSN right now and at the end I will have a wide variety of clinical experience.

Real examples: A new grad BSN told me that she doesn't own a wrist watch because the last time she was required to wear one and actually get an apical or manual radial pulse or for that matter, get a manual BP, was one check off, at her school's lab. Never required in clinicals. Another nurse, who went through another BSN program, confided in me that she was really nervous about starting a new hospital job because she had -0- clinical experience with IVs. Yes, she said it was something to do with the hospital she had clinicals in and liability, but still. Sorry if I offended you, I just deducted that around where I live the BSN programs are not as demanding of their students, clinically speaking. Could be wrong since I've only dealt with a few.

Edited by Nola009

OUxPhys, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology. Has 4 years experience.

I cant speak for other programs but CSU does everything by the book. I know my clinical instructor requires apicals if giving a cardiac med that requires it. We are currently learning about IV meds right now and then 2 weeks from now I hopefully should be able to hang and change IVs.

Some schools do limit their students though. I have also seen some lazy clinical instructors that dont require their students to do much. Personally I think it comes down to clinical instructors. If they dont have high standards then the student will not benefit.

No offense taken, just thought the comment was a little biased :)

OUxPhys: The lazy instructors or ones who tread too lightly (at the really high priced schools, I speculate) aren't doing anybody any favors. Hope your instructors are a positive part of your learning experiences, and that you are able to make the most of your education! :up:

OUxPhys, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology. Has 4 years experience.

I was accepted to one really high priced private institution and Im glad I didnt go. They dont have labs so when they go to clinical the nurse has to teach them literally everything, which isnt fair to the nurse and it doesnt benefit the student.

I cant speak for other programs but CSU does everything by the book. I know my clinical instructor requires apicals if giving a cardiac med that requires it. We are currently learning about IV meds right now and then 2 weeks from now I hopefully should be able to hang and change IVs.

Some schools do limit their students though. I have also seen some lazy clinical instructors that dont require their students to do much. Personally I think it comes down to clinical instructors. If they dont have high standards then the student will not benefit.

No offense taken, just thought the comment was a little biased :)

While I am sure that there are some lazy clinical faculty out there, you should also know that sometimes students' experiences are limited by the hospitals themselves. For example, there are hospitals that do not let nursing students give narcotics, even though would be supervised while doing so. Students should also realize that nursing programs don't just send you out to a hospital for your clinicals; there are complex legal contacts between the program and hospital that spell out what students will be permitted to do at that institution.

OUxPhys, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology. Has 4 years experience.

Im aware. My post was in response to the one above who said BSN programs arent adequately prepared as associate programs are.