Why is it so bad to be an LPN ????

Nurses LPN/LVN

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HeartJulz

305 Posts

Specializes in My first yr. as a LVN!.

Also us as LPN/VNs we still go to nursing school, graduate and then study and take NCLEX... UGH the nerve of people-- lets pretend nurse?- Id wanna occlude someones cartoid... !

tach

1 Post

I am very interested in working as an independent provider LPN. Does anybody have any info on this? Is there any additional training needed?

Dream2BANurse

175 Posts

Specializes in Corrections.

Im not a nurse yet...prenursing student, but the one comment that irritates me the most is (and not from RN's) "in a few years you wont be able to get a job as an LPN because they are doing away with them." Someone at my school even went as far as to tell me how the nursing instructors are mean to the mobility students when they come back to make the transition to RN and that they usually end up quitting because after working as an LPN they can't "grasp" what they learn in RN classes. Sounds like a bunch of bull to me.

I have nothing against RN's, I hope to be one someday myself. Ive come into contact with some who make it obvious that they love their job and then the ones who I assumed were having a bad day. But at the moment I have 3 kids and a husband who pays all the bills. Im paying for my education and 1 1/2 yrs sound alot better than 3 1/2, hopefully I can get a position as an LPN that will provide me assistance to eventually go back for RN.

suanna

1,549 Posts

Specializes in Post Anesthesia.

There are so many replys to your post you prob don't need my two cents but here goes: If you want to be an RN- be one. LPN isn't a stepping stone. Many of the college classes you take may not transfer esp if there is a lag between when you take them for your LPN and go back for your RN. I may ge flamed for this but LPN nursing is getting less and less common in my area. The responsibilities of a nurse in an acute care setting are almost always that of an RN. LTC facillities still use LPNs but it's a tough job. In addition RN education is very competitive and demanding. With a LPN job you may have trouble keeping up ar finding the flexibility to arrange your classes. To get your LPN is a waste of your resources and energy if it isn't where you want to end up.

PNCC2001

117 Posts

Specializes in OB, Family Practice, Pediatrics.
Many of the college classes you take may not transfer esp if there is a lag between when you take them for your LPN and go back for your RN. In addition RN education is very competitive and demanding...To get your LPN is a waste of your resources and energy if it isn't where you want to end up.

I just wanted to mention that the first two semesters of the RN program here at our community college, are identical to the LPN program. It may not be a matter of worrying about transferring credits later on, if that's what you decide to do; if your schools are also set up like this.

You need to do what is right for YOU; and no one else. If you want to stop at LPN, then stop; and feel good about your choice.

pagandeva2000, LPN

7,984 Posts

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

I have learned that I cannot let what someone else thinks interfere with what I gauge as my personal success. I am glad to be an LPN, and have no intention of going further. I have been expanding my role by taking continuing education courses and learning all that I can. But, being a nurse is not the only thing that defines me. I am a mother, wife, friend, sister and mentor. My life has to balance in areas that are important to me. Thus far, except for a few oddballs, I have gained a great deal of respect as an LPN because of my dedication to being a positive team member and resource. I am also humble enough to say that I do not know, and need the imput of more seasoned nurses, may they be RNs or LPNs to help me make it through my day.

AutumnAustria

21 Posts

"There are so many replys to your post you prob don't need my two cents but here goes: If you want to be an RN- be one. LPN isn't a stepping stone. Many of the college classes you take may not transfer esp if there is a lag between when you take them for your LPN and go back for your RN. I may ge flamed for this but LPN nursing is getting less and less common in my area. The responsibilities of a nurse in an acute care setting are almost always that of an RN. LTC facillities still use LPNs but it's a tough job. In addition RN education is very competitive and demanding. With a LPN job you may have trouble keeping up ar finding the flexibility to arrange your classes. To get your LPN is a waste of your resources and energy if it isn't where you want to end up. " -Suanna

I would like to say, Suanna, that there are 2 schools that I can choose from that will are 2 year RN programs. The one is a vocational school in which you have to take the LPN program first to move on to the 2nd year in RN course work. And, the other has a waiting list that is 3 years long to be in the RN program which is only 7 quarters. I didn't want to waste my time waiting around to get into that program that I decided to take the LPN route and then move on to LPN to RN AT THE SAME SCHOOL (meaning: those courses transfer to the next step). LPN can be a stepping stone for people that don't have the time to go to a full-time RN program because of family or money issues. And sometimes people are happy working in LTC as an LPN. And, actually, come to think of it...the hospital that I work at is no longer hiring PCA's in the NICU, they are hiring LPN's instead so I feel my position will be needed/wanted and I will be able to get where I want with an LPN while I plan to go to RN school and beyond. This also means there are those people that will stop at LPN and still be in demand. And, if I get my LPN and for some reason don't finish RN school or have to take some time off, I have my LPN to fall back on.

monurse4u

1 Post

Specializes in Acute Care, Emergency, Corrections, LTC,.

I have been an LPN for 15 years and I CHOSE to be an LPN for awhile instead of going right into an RN program because I wanted the "hands on" practical experience. I have not regretted decision at all. I have been fortunate and have gained a tremendous amount of knowledge and experience in the last 15 years. I am currently pursuing a degree in Criminal Investigations which will allow me to work in the field of forensics. After obtaining my degree I will continue to keep my LPN licensure active not just because it will assist me in my career goals but because I am proud of being an LPN.

suanna

1,549 Posts

Specializes in Post Anesthesia.

I would like to say, Suanna, that there are 2 schools that I can choose from that will are 2 year RN programs. The one is a vocational school in which you have to take the LPN program first to move on to the 2nd year in RN course work. And, the other has a waiting list that is 3 years long to be in the RN program which is only 7 quarters. I didn't want to waste my time waiting around to get into that program that I decided to take the LPN route and then move on to LPN to RN AT THE SAME SCHOOL (meaning: those courses transfer to the next step).

I see your point. If the schools offer a program tailored to your goals, esp with the waiting period, the route you have outlined isn't too bad of a way to go. I still think the school is beafing up its LPN enrolment at your expense because it can't provide for enough RN openings. The programs I have been familiar with offer a much diluted chemistry, bibology, and english options tailored specificaly to the LPN school. I didn't mean any disrespect to your choice- I just hate to see someone pay twice for clinicals. My local LPN program is 18mos full time, the ADN RN program just down the road is 24mos. LPN program is a little cheaper but more financial aid is avail for the ADN RN. The opportunities and compensation for an RN are much greater in this area. Good luck whatever your choice.

AutumnAustria

21 Posts

Suanna, I see that you are from Northeast Ohio, is that near Cleveland? My sister went to school up there to be an LPN because of the cheaper cost, I think. In Columbus, most of the programs, unless you go to something like Columbus Public for your LPN, are pretty hard and in-depth in the sciences. I am going to the local community college that offers both programs, and the sciences we take in LPN are the exact courses that we would take in the RN program. Plus, I may be a little biased because I have finished every pre-requisite course for both the LPN and the RN program and every co-requisite course in each program as well. All I have left to take is the remainder of the core LPN courses and then, all I am doing is taking the 7 quarters of the LPN and then getting into the 4th quarter (of 7) in the RN program with every course besides the RN Nursing core courses to take as well. So, I guess I'm a little ahead of the game and just want to start some sort of Nursing core curriculum already...since I have nothing else to take! I just can't wait to be some sort of Nurse. I feel like I've been working at this forever and another 2 years isn't going to kill me!!

suanna

1,549 Posts

Specializes in Post Anesthesia.

AutumnAustria, The program I'm familiar with is the one my wife attended for LPN training. They did take a few classes at the local college but almost all thier book time was in off campus "classes" specificaly designed for thier LPN program. Even if all the classroom hours applied both to the LPN program and the RN program interchangeably, I still think the course provider is double charging students who wish to persue thier RN after LPN training. Like I said, the difference is 18mos vs 24mos (for an AD program). Ideally the school would devote its resources to expanding the opportunities for students who have an RN licence as thier ultimate goal. I'd bet thier profit margin goes up if they can get you to pay for LPN clinical hours and again for RN clinical training.

vivibonita

110 Posts

Unfortunately for some people getting into an RN program is almost impossible (not enough space, too many prerequisites, not enough money, etc...), if getting into nursing means going trhough the LVN program... I say why not? (that's what I had to do) at least they'll get their feet wet and get some experience while working towards the RN.

They don't make double profit for getting LVNs to go through the LVN-RN transition program, given that they only accept a few to get into this and that grants for this program are really hard to get... at least something is being done to get more RNs or at least more people interested in moving up the career ladder. I believe double charging would be if the school was making the LVN go through the RN program from the beginning and not from 3rd semester.

Peace

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