What's your story? Why did you take up nursing?

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Specializes in Programming / Strategist for allnurses. Has 26 years experience.

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jas_tea

jas_tea

5 Posts

I'm 26 and got laid off... I was miserable for the past yr at my work sitting at my desk asking me if this is my life and if I went to college to surf the internet and deal with b***y fashionistas who think they're better than you... I rather deal with life as it happens and not read about it on the internet... I have a long way to go.. hopefully the job market picks up when I graduate a program.

mmulligan23

mmulligan23

Specializes in ICU, IMCU. 28 Posts

I have always thought that someday I would become a nurse. My mother is a nurse, my grandmother is a nurse, my aunt is a nurse, and my cousin is a nurse. So, you see, it's in my blood.

In 2002 I took a job as a patient care tech in the ICU and IMCU in a small local hospital. I wanted to gain some experience before going to nursing school. About a month after starting my new position I was assigned the patient that no one else wanted. We will call him Mr. B for HIPPA purposes.

I refer to Mr. B as the patient no one wanted because he really was a nightmare to deal with. He was stubborn and just plain mean! Mr. B would curse anyone who set foot in his room especially the nurses and care staff. I dreaded what I might hear when I walked through his door, but I kept a smile just the same. I must admit that the care that I provided to Mr. B was better care than I gave my less difficult patients, even though he scared the crap out of me.

I remember one afternoon while I was helping him to the bedside commode, as he was cursing me, he said, "it's a d*** shame that a grown man can't s*** by himself". Those words, as horrible as they may have been, were the key to understanding this man. At that moment I knew why he was the way he was, and I didn't say a word. It was his pride that was causing the entire ruckus. So, after I cleaned him up and got him back in his bed, I looked him straight in the face...as he was still cursing me...and said, "Listen! One day someone might have to help me the way I'm helping you, and I would rather it be someone like me....so just let me help you". From that moment on, anytime Mr. B needed something, he called me.

As time went by, his condition continued to deteriorate. My last interaction with Mr. B. was when I was called to take some ice chips to him. As I put the cup down on his bedside table he grabbed my arm...startling me, as I knew his nature..."Thank you". "You're welcome", I said smiling politely. He shook my arm and squeezed more tightly, "No....thank you." At that moment, I knew that I was meant to be a nurse.

When I returned to work for my next scheduled shift, I noticed that Mr. B's room was empty. My heart sank, because I knew what had happened. Seven years have passed since that day, but I will never forget Mr. B and the impact he has made in my life. His last words motivate me to be the first to volunteer for the most difficult patients. I want to be the kind of nurse that masters the art, not just the science of the profession.

I will finally be an RN in December!

mlok

mlok

99 Posts

I became a nurse because we needed one in the family. I am the first.

I wanted to be a nurse because my dad is stubborn.

Before nursing school, he would rarely take his medication, his diet was poor full of fatty unhealthy food, and rarely exercises.

I wanted to help my family, especially my dad. Currently his kidneys are at stage 3 and will need dialysis if he gets to 5... so I am trying really hard to keep him on track.

cop2bnurse41

cop2bnurse41

46 Posts

I was a cop for 7 years and was injured on the job. 9mm gsw to the right hand :cry:. After 2 surgeries a total of 10hrs. I thought i was good to go back to work. I was told be the Docs and the system that this was not going to happen! So I spent the next 2yrs trying to prove that I could still .do the job. I learned how to shoot with the other hand and spent countless hrs. Training lifting and getting my self ready to go. Even after all of this and getting my Doc to lower the disability from 80% to 50%. I was sent a letter that you are no loger being considered for reenstatement. Effective immeadiatly you are retired! Not a happy day for me:banghead:. i spent the next coupleof years doing construction. Which a hated. My brother has been a nurse for 20 yrs. He knew i had a bunch of credits and talked me into going back to school! So far it has been a great choice. Many of the skills you use in police work you use as a nurse! Plus I like to help people. So hear I am and i am happy to be hear!!:yeah:

CandyGyrl1985

CandyGyrl1985

136 Posts

Bumping to get this email to me:up: :typing

nrice28

nrice28

199 Posts

My story is pretty short and simple. My mom got diagnosed with aggressive stage 4 breast cancer when I was 13 yrs. old. I saw everything that she had to go through, chemo, bone infusions, oxygen...(cancer spread everywhere, obviously) I graduated high school in 2001. (my mom did see me graduate :) ) then I went to college. I originally wanted to go into medicine b/c I was gong-ho about curing cancer and saving everyone. When I realized that the doctors weren't the caring compassionate ones in the hospital, it was the nurses. So I changed my major to nursing and my mom was proud of me. Unfortunately, she passed away Sept. 23, 2003. It was a Tuesday, at 2:19 P.M. I was the last to say good bye, I am the youngest. We were very close and I miss her very much. But she died knowing that I was going to help others, she knew my determination. I am not an RN yet, I am not even in a nursing program yet, but I am not giving up and I WILL be a nurse. I feel like GOD lets things happen in peoples lives to help mold them into the people they are supposed to be. Although my mom was sick for 7 yrs. I never thought that day would come when she wouldn't be there anymore. It has been 6 yrs. this Sept. (maybe thats why I am SO sentimental right now). But I know that she is still proud of me and watching from above. Although my mom wasn't a nurse she passed on the compassion and kindness in me to be a truly memorable one.

Nurses_ROCK

Nurses_ROCK

1 Post

When I was eight years old, my mother got into a really bad car accident. She and her five friends were on their way to Las Vegas when she lost control of our van. Yes, she was the driver. Bystanders say that the van rolled over at least ten times and someone was thrown out of it too. Unfortunately, one of the passengers did not live but luckily, my mother did. The doctors called her a miracle. Majority of the driver's that get into major car accidents do not survive and if they did, they probably wouldn't be able to walk ever again. My mother survived with, what my family calls, minimal injuries.

I could just remember the first day she came home after several weeks in the hospital. There wasn't a dry eye in our home. My mother came home wearing, literally a cage on her head known as a halo. It was attached to her head by four pins, two around the orbitals, and the other two behind the ear. The halo prevented further injuries to the spinal cord.

My mom had the halo for eight months and during those eight months, my maternal instincts, my passion for taking care of others was exemplified. I fed my mother, I gave her bed baths, and I assisted her going to the bathroom. I had to act as if I was her mother. I only left her side to attend school other than that, I felt it was my duty to be beside her at all times. It hurt me to see her in pain. There were days where I would go to the bathroom and cry to myself and come out a little later with a smile on my face. Its what I had to do in order to show my mom that everything was going to be all right.

Sure enough, eight months later, my mom had the halo removed and she looked like she was back to normal. She had scars here and there but she was able to move her whole body and most importantly, walk.

My family was being tested on how close and how much we love and care for each other. It was the most difficult thing my family had ever experienced. When I cared for my mother, I decided that I wanted to be in a profession that would help heal people. Nurses seem to have the most direct contact with their patients. As a nurse, I'd want to know that I have impacted someone's health in a positive way. I want to look back and be proud of helping others as I helped my mother get her health back.

lpningeorgia

lpningeorgia

4 Posts

I always had an interest in the human body and why and how it functions the way it does. I also have a deep interest in how the mind works. So I figured it would be best for me to go into psych nursing.

moz

moz

122 Posts

The nurse who stepped in for only a few moments while I was in labor with my first child...she showed compassion that was inspiring. I had a strong curiousity toward the medical field...that and the program for nursing was 30 minutes from my home, and the college that I would have to go to become a teacher was 90 minutes away.

itsmejuli

itsmejuli

Specializes in Home Care. 1 Article; 2,188 Posts

I had a love of biology but discovered that going to school to get a biology degree and raising kids, then finding a job was just too much so I didn't complete it.

I spent the next 14 yrs raising my kids and being miserable in my jobs and just not knowing what I wanted to do with my life.

In 2005 I started volunteering for disaster services with the American Red Cross. Helping the people who suffered through hurricane Katrina was immensely satisfying. Doing this gave me insight into the side of my personality that needed nurturing. But I still had no clue what kind of job I wanted to do.

Then in the fall of 2006 my 24 yr old son fell 16 ft through a roof hitting his head on a table. He was taken to a trauma ICU and put on full life support. I spent a lot of time in the hospital with him and watched the nurses doing their jobs. They showed us a lot of compassion and answered all my questions.

I was fascinated by my son's recovery. The nurses amazed me in how they dealt with this young man who hadn't a clue who he was. I watched as my son made progress daily. One day I walked in to see him and he didn't know who I was or where he was. The next day he was all there and was ready to go home. I was truly amazed at how the brain can recover from such a traumatic injury.

That's when I finally decided nursing was for me. I started taking pre-reqs and excelled in A&P. But I was nervous about going into a career I really knew nothing about. I'd had no medical background so I decided to go the LPN route first to get my feet wet.

I loved LPN school, the first few months of clinicals were scary but I overcame that and went on to graduate the LPN program with honors.

I'm working now in flu clinics and really enjoy it. Of course I wish I could be working in skilled nursing but those jobs are difficult to find in this economy. I get lots of kudos from the experienced RNs and they all encourage me to continue on to RN.

I'm excited to say that I've received my acceptance letter to the LPN-RN transitional program. I start in May! I hope I can find a job in this area so I can complete the BSN at the same college that I"m doing the RN.

Blackheartednurse

Blackheartednurse

1,216 Posts

I was always interested in nursing or medicine in general,at first I wanted to go into Veterinary school (I love helping animals) but I was also drawn to nursing. I like the chalenge,intellectual stimulation as well technical part that nursing profession brings to the table...I dont think I would be interested any other medical field except maybe being a veterinarian or regular doc. I definitely didnt choose nursing for money because other medical professiono offer near the same pay or even better-I just couldnt see myself sitting my a machine all day taking pictures,interpreting them and on top of that having minimal patient contact.I'm also thinking about being a vet tech,aside being a nurse-which i accomplished arleady.

Reggie Aquilina

Reggie Aquilina

Specializes in Orthopaedics. Has 25 years experience. 12 Posts

I was not born with an urge to be a nurse and just sort of drifted into the job because I could not find another one at the time.

However I find human beings fascinating and one of my personal Values is Connection.

Exploring the way people experience the world we live in and interpret it is really something thas is really interesting. So probably I was drawn to the fact that nursing offered a medium through which I could communicate and connect with people.

There was a time when I really wanted to leave nursing a few years back and it was a very turbulent part in my life when I was just fed up of everything and I just could not find any meaning in my life. I would drag myself to work in a depressive state and returning back to work after a long leave was like facing the electric chair!

However it was an 'aha' experience for me because during this difficult period I suddenly realised that it was not the job itself that was the real problem. The problem was me - the way I was filtering my experiences. This illuminating experience set me off on a journey of self-discovery and over the next few months it was like starting to live a new life. I started searching for more Meaning in life and took courses on Hypnotherapy, Life coaching and meditation as well as read a lot of self growth books. Not only did I bounce back into enjoying nursing but I also started creating changes in my clinical area with a new passion.

And because of this I seem to have attracted towards me an opportunity to develop into something that further helped in honoring my other values namely freedom and creativity. I became the first Practice Development Nurse in my country (Malta) and I now had the freedom to create new systems and work in the area that I so love and that's personal development and staff development.

So I think that nursing is really a job, possibly a calling apart from other jobs and I think there is so much we can do to make a better world.