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What Paramedics do, and how you can help

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by nyccemt-p nyccemt-p (New) New

After reading many posts which all have the same battle, that I got sucked into also, I decided to start a new thread to answer questions about what Paramedics are, do, and why we do it.

First off some background...

EMS as we know it is new on the healthcare block. We have only been around as you know us since about 1970. Prior to that it was "you call, we haul!" Paramedics initially had about 3 - 6 months of training, most of it disorganized at best, set up at and by regional hospitals. Today most programs for the Paramedic are AAS degree programs with over 1000 hours of clinical and field training. Most of us all ahve the alphabet soup after our initial education, including but not limited to ACLS, PALS, BTLS, PHTLS, AMLS, aeiou and sometimes y, etc. Many of us are instructors in CPR/BCLS/AED, ACLS, PALS, and are used as guest lecturers in nursing CME's. We also have specialized training for the critical care environment started by UMBC called CCEMT-P. This training incorporates us into critical care by teaching us how to interpret invasive pressure monitoring waveforms, IABP, art lines, central line placement/care, chest tube placement/care, lab/ABG drawing and interpreting, x-ray interpretation, etc. As you can see we are not just ambulance drivers.

The majority of EMS in the US is provided by volunteers, who have full time jobs and families. These dedicated and under appreciated individuals donate their time for training (sometimes paying for it out of their own pockets), and time for calls and administrative duties for their organizations. Of those EMS people who are paid, most don't earn enough to make ends meet for just themselves. But they do it anyway because they enjoy it. EMS is the health care safety net.

The next time you see a Paramedic or EMT, thank them for the work they do. A little thanks can go a long way in mending the EMS Nurse rift.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask and I or someone else with EMS experience will answer them for you.

kwagner_51

Specializes in Geriatrics, Pediatrics, Home Health.

After reading many posts which all have the same battle, that I got sucked into also, I decided to start a new thread to answer questions about what Paramedics are, do, and why we do it.

First off some background...

EMS as we know it is new on the healthcare block. We have only been around as you know us since about 1970. Prior to that it was "you call, we haul!" Paramedics initially had about 3 - 6 months of training, most of it disorganized at best, set up at and by regional hospitals. Today most programs for the Paramedic are AAS degree programs with over 1000 hours of clinical and field training. Most of us all ahve the alphabet soup after our initial education, including but not limited to ACLS, PALS, BTLS, PHTLS, AMLS, aeiou and sometimes y, etc. Many of us are instructors in CPR/BCLS/AED, ACLS, PALS, and are used as guest lecturers in nursing CME's. We also have specialized training for the critical care environment started by UMBC called CCEMT-P. This training incorporates us into critical care by teaching us how to interpret invasive pressure monitoring waveforms, IABP, art lines, central line placement/care, chest tube placement/care, lab/ABG drawing and interpreting, x-ray interpretation, etc. As you can see we are not just ambulance drivers.

The majority of EMS in the US is provided by volunteers, who have full time jobs and families. These dedicated and under appreciated individuals donate their time for training (sometimes paying for it out of their own pockets), and time for calls and administrative duties for their organizations. Of those EMS people who are paid, most don't earn enough to make ends meet for just themselves. But they do it anyway because they enjoy it. EMS is the health care safety net.

The next time you see a Paramedic or EMT, thank them for the work they do. A little thanks can go a long way in mending the EMS Nurse rift.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask and I or someone else with EMS experience will answer them for you.

Before I comment, I want you to know that I absolutely, totally RESPECT Paramedics and EMT's. I am a Basic EMT.

However, would you mind explaining WHY paramedic students, sit in CCU/ICU WITHOUT their instructors? At the hospital where I have nursing clinicals, the paramedics CAN'T do anything, except watch!!To me it is so sad. They aren't getting any training, because the RN's aren't willing to put their license on the line for the paramedics. If CCU/ICU is busy, they are in the way and resented.

They are not allowed to even work a code. When I was in Basic training, I had to arrange my own clinical time at the hospital [ER] and on the ambulance. The instructors had NO IDEA whether I did it or not. The only requirements were, we had to make contact with 3 patients on the ambulance and spend 8 hrs. in the ER.

Nursing school is alot different. We have clinical instructors who are also nurses. We pactice under their license. I saw two paramedic students during my time on CCU. I felt sorry for them for several reasons:

1.) They were bored out of their minds!

2.) They were required to spend 800 hrs in CCU and had a year to do it in.

3.) They weren't allowed to even get the patients a drink of water.

PLEASE tell me this isn't the norm for paramedic training. Why aren't the instructors there with them?

Thanks!!

_______________________________________________________

In His Grace,

Karen

Failure is NOT an option!!

After reading many posts which all have the same battle, that I got sucked into also, I decided to start a new thread to answer questions about what Paramedics are, do, and why we do it.

First off some background...

EMS as we know it is new on the healthcare block. We have only been around as you know us since about 1970. Prior to that it was "you call, we haul!" Paramedics initially had about 3 - 6 months of training, most of it disorganized at best, set up at and by regional hospitals. Today most programs for the Paramedic are AAS degree programs with over 1000 hours of clinical and field training. Most of us all ahve the alphabet soup after our initial education, including but not limited to ACLS, PALS, BTLS, PHTLS, AMLS, aeiou and sometimes y, etc. Many of us are instructors in CPR/BCLS/AED, ACLS, PALS, and are used as guest lecturers in nursing CME's. We also have specialized training for the critical care environment started by UMBC called CCEMT-P. This training incorporates us into critical care by teaching us how to interpret invasive pressure monitoring waveforms, IABP, art lines, central line placement/care, chest tube placement/care, lab/ABG drawing and interpreting, x-ray interpretation, etc. As you can see we are not just ambulance drivers.

The majority of EMS in the US is provided by volunteers, who have full time jobs and families. These dedicated and under appreciated individuals donate their time for training (sometimes paying for it out of their own pockets), and time for calls and administrative duties for their organizations. Of those EMS people who are paid, most don't earn enough to make ends meet for just themselves. But they do it anyway because they enjoy it. EMS is the health care safety net.

The next time you see a Paramedic or EMT, thank them for the work they do. A little thanks can go a long way in mending the EMS Nurse rift.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask and I or someone else with EMS experience will answer them for you.

This arguement will never end. It is as ridiculous as the ASN/BSN rift.

I put myself through nursing school working Fire/Rescue. The guys I worked with thought I was "selling out." While in school, a couple of instructors were openly hostile to myself and another Paramedic that was in my class. We were told Medics are only para-professionals. We both learned to play dumb a quickly.

I make a lot more being an RN without having to go in burning buildings or cutting pts out of cars. The duties are different but both jobs are just as important. In the field or in the CCU my job is to assess and treat the pt.

dbsn00

Specializes in LTC, sub-acute, urology, gastro. Has 6 years experience.

I don't understand how anyone could NOT have repsect for EMS or Paramedics - I could NEVER do that job, way too stressful (although the EMTs I know LOVE their jobs, also know a few nurses/EMTs that seem to drifting more to the EMT side!). I'm surprised by the above post in regards to the training - it is too bad, IMO they are vital members in the field.

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 24 years experience.

I think the respect needs to be mutual, period. I respect Paramedics/EMT's. I hope they respect us nurses, too. Cause we must work together for the good of the patient.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Respect works both ways. As one of the majority (volunteer fire/EMS), I'm a volunteer pre-hospital RN. I have the utmost respect for all of the paramedics and critical care medics that I work with. However, they also truly respect me also. We work together for the good of the patient. I truly enjoy my volunteer work. Thanks for pointing out some things that some people might not be aware of.

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