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bnm65435 bnm65435 (New Member) New Member

What to expect from orientation

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Hi. I am a new grad who is going to be working in a Level 2 Trauma Center in a month or so. I was wondering what I can expect from orientation training and if anyone has any tips for how to help transition from nursing student to ED nurse. Are there any books that you recommend to study while I am awaiting my start date? Thanks!

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Hi. I am a new grad who is going to be working in a Level 2 Trauma Center in a month or so. I was wondering what I can expect from orientation training and if anyone has any tips for how to help transition from nursing student to ED nurse. Are there any books that you recommend to study while I am awaiting my start date? Thanks!

I am not now nor have I ever been (or aspired to be) an ER nurse. I've been quite happy in ICU since 1982. But I have oriented a good many new nurses, so perhaps I can give you some generally applicable advice.

Here goes:

To the best of your ability, work with the preceptor you're given. Nurse managers and orientation coordinators and staff educators work together to assign the best preceptors to each new grad. You may not see a method to their madness, but I assure you it's there. Many managers see working with your assigned preceptor as a test of your ability to get along with their existing staff. Asking for a new preceptor, especially without a very good reason, puts a target on your back.

Your preceptor's preferred teaching method may not be your preferred learning method, but try. A good preceptor will try to teach to your best learning method, while a new preceptor or a not-so-good preceptor may not be able to. There are only so many good, experienced preceptors to go around and if you're not lucky enough to get one of them, try to make do. It's OK to ask another experienced nurse to explain pacemakers, for example, if your preceptor cannot explain it in a way you understand. I can do temporary pacer checks in my sleep (and probably have) but cannot for the life of me explain it in a way my orients can understand. (Any of my orientees. Ever.) I send them to Ann. I'm the go-to person for ventricular assist devices and balloon pumps though, and other preceptors send their orientees to me.

Plan to study at home. Even experienced nurses study at home every time they change jobs or specialties! It's just part of the joy of changing jobs.

Know what you need to work on. If your preceptor calls in sick and you are assigned to someone else, they'll ask you what you need to work on. Make sure you have an answer for them.

Don't turn down any learning opportunities. I once saw an experienced nurse offer a new grad an opportunity to start IVs. The new grad disdainfully turned her down, saying, "I already did that once." The new grad was perceived to have an attitude problem and she didn't even make it off orientation.

While I'm there, please don't be the new grad with an attitude problem. The guy who couldn't believe he'd "be forced to work weekends, holidays, and nights" and said so vociferously at every opportunity actually was NOT forced to work weekends, holidays or nights. He is no longer employed in our ICU or in our institution. The one who bragged that he new everything he needed to know and was an awesome nurse is also unemployed. The guy who didn't think he needed to follow "any stupid rules" is now gainfully employed and routinely asking "Do you want fries with that?"

It may not be fair (I didn't think so when I was a new grad), but if people LIKE you, they'll cut you some slack when you inevitably make a mistake. If they DISLIKE you, they won't. Say hello to everyone you encounter at work, and introduce yourself as many times as it takes for them to remember who you are. Take a minute or two to ask the housekeeping staff, the physicians, everyone you meet about their kids, pets or hobbies. As you get to know people, you'll know who to ask what. In the mean time, pay attention to what your preceptor chats with folks about.

There's lots more tips, but fortunately there are lots of threads to read.

http://https://allnurses.com/general-nursing-discussion/what-to-expect-991973.html

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RubyVee you have some valid points, but as a new graduate myself...i just wonder why do experienced nurses eat their young and why do nurse managers allow this behavior on their units? The turnover for new grads in their first job is ridiculously high and hospitals seem not to care about the money they spend/lose training new grads who dont stay not even 6 months. nursing is the most catty field of work i have ever encountered its like if youre a quiet professional person that likes to do your work and focus on your care and mind your business you dont fit in ! The only people who seem to fit in on these units are people who tell their personal business such as who you're dating, or you're house is in foreclosure , you failed a class at school...if you're spilling your life story you're well liked and you'll make it off of orientation with no issues, regardless of skill level or readiness...why is this?

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