7 Ways to Sabotage Your Own Success in Nursing School

It is difficult to imagine a student self-sabotaging their academic journey. I don’t think any student intentionally tries to prevent themselves from progressing in a nursing program. However, in my experience as a nurse faculty, I picked up on patterns of behavior that self limited student success. This article will provide insight on these behaviors and how to avoid them. Nurses General Nursing Article

Updated:   Published

You are reading page 2 of 7 Ways to Sabotage Your Own Success in Nursing School

Columnist

J.Adderton, BSN, MSN

121 Articles; 499 Posts

Specializes in Clinical Leadership, Staff Development, Education.

Great suggestions. I enjoy psych too... it is interesting how are interests change and that is the good thing about nursing!

femto said:
Thanks for sharing these! I'm finishing my last 2 months of nursing school and thought they were great points. 2 things I wish I'd known years back: first, verbalize positives. Even if you think your program/instructor/clinical site is less-than-the-best, find something good to say. When a preceptor asks what you want to do after nursing school, find something true and positive the current assignment. Maybe you say "I started school because I was interested in Women's Health, but I am really enjoying learning about therapeutic communication here on psych." Nothing shuts down conversation faster than telling the other person you don't want to be where they work.

Second, try to get hospital work experience. I'm a second career nurse. Looking back, I wish I'd taken a tech job, even if it was full-time and meant I had to delay graduation. If you're in a busy metropolis with plenty of nurses, you need those connections for your first nursing job.

Thanks for supporting us student nurses!

Columnist

J.Adderton, BSN, MSN

121 Articles; 499 Posts

Specializes in Clinical Leadership, Staff Development, Education.

I hope your words bring encouragement to students struggling to "fit it all in". Great way to use the powerpoints.

JBMmom said:
I totally agree with tonyl1234. Some people like to make anything in life out to be a monumental challenge. Nursing is a challenging degree, but so are many other degrees in college. I've been through a few degrees myself, and the students I heard complaining most about all the other stuff they must be missing because they were working so hard, were the nursing students. Yes, you're going to miss some stuff because of school, but you don't have to live like a hermit and be miserable. I was in school while working full time and raising three young kids. I missed some time with them, but I still had plenty of time to coach soccer, teach swim lessons and Sunday school and spend quality time with family and friends.

The only other point I would add that in addition to going to class, be engaged. My first degrees were way back before the days of powerpoint so we had to listen and take all of our notes on blank paper. When I returned years later for nursing school I found that they would give out a powerpoint, and then some professors would just read it. Students were texting, playing angry birds (I obviously went a while back), and every now and then look at the powerpoint. I took my notes on a blank sheet of paper and then used the powerpoint as a study guide. I think it cut my study time in half because I was engaged the first time around. Other students thought I was crazy, but it worked for me.

Good luck to current nursing students, you can do this.

By using the site, you agree with our Policies. X