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US or Australia?

Posted
Golden82 Golden82 (New) New

I am typically a lurker, but I am hoping someone here can be of assistance or at the very least offer their educated opinion.

Some background: I am currently working on my prerequisites to attain my BSN here in the US. I still have a ways to go before applying for a nursing program (probably 2 years, as I am working full time prior to hopefully getting accepted into a nursing program here.) I am 31 and this will be my first degree (better late than never!!) I have, naturally, met a man who is an American living in Australia.

My question: If things keep going in the direction they have been in my relationship, I would be looking to move to Australia myself to join him. I am curious as to what would be a smart decision regarding my degree, as not attaining my BSN is not an option for me. Would you suggest that A) I stay in the US and finish out my degree here and then get licensed in Australia, B) See if I could do some sort of "study abroad" thing through the University here (if that is even an option, I have NO idea how that sort of thing works) or C) should I just try to get some type of Visa and try to do the whole nursing program in Australia? My concern is that if I DO somehow finish and gain my degree in Australia, if we decided to move back to the US later in life, does does anyone know how that would work? Similarly, I know that it is a timely process to get licensed in Australia. I have not done a lot of research, but I wonder if it would prove difficult for me to gain a license in Australia being freshly licensed in America without having working experience. I also read something about age adding hindrance in some Visa's?

Any knowledge, opinions or just flat out pointing me in the right direction to begin my research would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

It's easier to move US -> AU with a US BSN but still a giant pain in the arse. Basically if you think you'll want to work as an RN in the US at any point, I would advise you to do your training in the US.

PS: Unsolicited advice: Be verrry careful basing your life and education decisions on a man you've just met! Choose what is best for you - if it didn't work out with him and you wanted to come home, you would face many problems, and need time and money to get a US license with AU training. Just be smart.

What if I graduated bachelor of nursing in australia and got registered, is it easier to transfer and find a work in USA? Do i need to take the NCLEX if ever?

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

You cannot practice nursing in the US without a license. In order to be licensed, you must pass NCLEX. Moving from one country to another is not a "transfer" - you have to jump through hoops no matter which direction you go. One of the biggest issues is that US nursing education produces generalists... not so in the UK.

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC. Has 32 years experience.

Australian nurse training like the UK training tends to be missing clinical and theory in Obstetrics. If you meet state requirements and pass NCLEX as a Australian citizen you have the option of E3 but if a new grad may find it hard to find employer wiling to take you on

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

What if I graduated bachelor of nursing in australia and got registered, is it easier to transfer and find a work in USA? Do i need to take the NCLEX if ever?

You cannot practice nursing in the US without a license. In order to be licensed, you must pass NCLEX. Moving from one country to another is not a "transfer" - you have to jump through hoops no matter which direction you go. One of the biggest issues is that US nursing education produces generalists... not so in the UK.

Being a RN in Australia does not make it easier to go and work in the USA. You still need to get licensed in whatever US state you plan to work in (which includes passing NCLEX and all board requirements). As previously stated, Australian Bachelor of Nursing degree may not provide adequate theory and clinical hours to pass those board requirements. The training is the issue and not the fact that you were registered as a RN in Australia.

IF YOU WANT TO WORK IN THE USA - train in the USA.

If you just want to travel for a while and work in the USA, then you may be able to use the E-3 work visa for Australians from an immigration standpoint, but you still need a US nursing license first, including NCLEX pass etc.

I am not sure what HouTx means about UK requirements, as they have nothing to do with either Australian or US requirements.

Silverdragon102, BSN

Specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC. Has 32 years experience.

Being a RN in Australia does not make it easier to go and work in the USA. You still need to get licensed in

I am not sure what HouTx means about UK requirements, as they have nothing to do with either Australian or US requirements.

I think it is in reference to how the UK training is more specialised and concentrates one one area like adult and miss clinical and theory hours in other areas

Can I just offer two cents of advice? Moving half way around the world without a college education (or means to support yourself) for a relationship is dangerous. It's ripe for abuse. The power dynamic is off from the beginning. You will have limited control of the situation. I did that. I ended up living in a women's shelter with an infant. Obviously just one story but ask yourself this: If the relationship goes south, if you cannot afford to support yourself, how will you leave? How will you buy that plane ticket home? Will you be able to leave knowing that you are returning to nothing, and probably poorer than when you left, now older with no education?

Also, keep in mind that you will not qualify for a permanent visa for two years AFTER being granted a temporary visa, which is usually after ONE year of living with your boyfriend (unless you get married) (I'm assuming you're thinking of going over on the Working-Holiday Visa?). 1+2 = 3 years AFTER you arrive, IF your visa is processed toot-sweet. Citizenship takes another two years (1+2+2=5). Here's what you can and can't do during this time:

For that first year, before you are granted temporary residency, you are not allowed to study more than a few months (3?). As an international student, it'll be expensive. You will have limited work rights and the only jobs available will be the kind that backpackers like. Some places flat out will not hire you because they want someone who can work for more than six months. It's probably going to be at or near minimum wage. Australia is a very, very, very expensive country. Where are you moving to? Sydney/Melbourne are something like the #3 and #4 most expensive cities in the world to live in. If you think minimum wage is high at $16ish an hour, look up the rent prices (Big city suburban one-bedroom, rock bottom, $1400/month. Sydney = a lot worse). Look up the metro fares ($12 in big city for a single day, all travel zones (you'll need all). How much is a liter of milk? I think a lemon, a single lemon, was two or three dollars. A movie ticket was $18. Gas, clothing (and the girls are fashionable)...

Also, health insurance. You won't be eligible during this year for the free(ish) government-paid medical care. Do you have your own? Does it cover overseas care?

AFTER you are granted a TEMPORARY visa, you will have full study and work rights, but NOT eligible for government subsidized places at university (Commonwealth Supported Places), so it will be EXPENSIVE. You will also be eligible for free(ish) government-paid medical care. It doesn't cover everything, and there are bizarre things you would think it covers that it doesn't cover. Like a commonly used medication here that ran me several hundreds of dollars per month. Frequent psychologist visits, if you do that. Other little things, foot doctors require extra hoops to get. Physical therapy too.

Finally, in two years, if your relationships lasts (and if it doesn't you usually are not allowed to stay) you can apply for a permanent visa. As a permanent resident, you are eligible for government subsidized places at university (Commonwealth Supported Places) BUT KEEP IN MIND it will still cost THOUSANDS of dollars per year. (If you hear people talk about HECS/HELP (sounds like hex), keep in mind you are not eligible unless you are a citizen or refugee. Not everyone understands this. Here's the website: Welcome - Study Assist). Also, as a permanent resident, you will be eligible for public welfare, including student payments. (And, while you there for the first year and a temporary resident, even though you can't get any public welfare payments, if you boyfriend does, as soon as you arrive, they will go down because the government assumes that two people can live cheaper than one, and his living costs are now less.)

You would not qualify for HECS/HELP, which is a government loan to pay for school until you were a citizen, which would be another two years, for a total of 5, from the day you landed in Australia.

Just FYIing :) Have all the info before you. Good luck!

Oops, I made a mistake. After getting PR, permanent residency, you would need to wait only one year, not two, before applying for citizenship.