Jump to content

The Future of Nursing Retention

Nurses Article   (2,204 Views 27 Replies 825 Words)

Brenda F. Johnson has 25 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Gastrointestinal Nursing.

5 Followers; 73 Articles; 104,535 Visitors; 251 Posts

advertisement

There are many reasons why nurses leave the bedside and go into other areas or leave nursing altogether. Some reasons are due to patient level of acuity, long hours, weekends, or lack of schedule flexibility. There are many hospitals that are creative in trying to retain or recruit nurses back to the bedside. However, Allegheny Health Network in Pittsburgh has come up with an “out of the box” plan to bring nurses back to the bedside. You are reading page 3 of The Future of Nursing Retention. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

3 Followers; 26,389 Visitors; 5,385 Posts

1 minute ago, morelostthanfound said:

 No, I agree with panurse999- this is just another means of 'raising the bar' to create an additional hurdle that older nurse can't/won't jump.  As an older nurse with 27 years' experience (and a BSN), there is no way I am returning to school for a MSN.  The ROI alone for someone my age is absolutely not worth it and that $ would be much better spent in an existing IRA.  Better though to get rid of the remaining experienced nurses who have given years of loyal service to make way for the new crop of graduate nurses (at a considerably lower salary).  Yah, very proactive thinking-we all know it's solely motivated by the desire to deliver a safer and higher level of care!

That may be true, but it's not a vast conspiracy by multiple agencies to enrich schools. It's about corporate greed of the hiring entities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Follower; 1,918 Visitors; 193 Posts

15 hours ago, traumaRUs said:

Great discussion with some great solutions. While Allegheny has implemented this program, maybe other hospital systems should look to their own workforce too to better figure out why nurses are leaving. 

Would love to know what other places are doing to address nurse turnover? In 20 years of nursing I remember exactly one employer who sent me an exit interview form in the mail, 2 months after I left. One. In 20 years of job hopping. 

The only solution I have seen is for corporations to import foreign nurse labor, who by the definition of their work visa, have to say put where they are, for the duration, like it or not. 

My personal experience has been constant turnover fueled and forced by the corporation itself, because it saves them money in the long run. The longer a nurse sticks around, the higher their pay, the more perks they accumulate, etc. This is what corporations hate. 

So, while Allegheny Health Network advertises this feel good program, to bring nurses back, one really has to wonder if its just more pandering to the falsities that nurses are in high demand and short supply. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Follower; 1,918 Visitors; 193 Posts

21 minutes ago, morelostthanfound said:

 No, I agree with panurse999- this is just another means of 'raising the bar' to create an additional hurdle that older nurse can't/won't jump.  As an older nurse with 27 years' experience (and a BSN), there is no way I am returning to school for a MSN.  The ROI alone for someone my age is absolutely not worth it and that $ would be much better spent in an existing IRA.  Better though to get rid of the remaining experienced nurses who have given years of loyal service to make way for the new crop of graduate nurses (at a considerably lower salary).  Yah, very proactive thinking-we all know it's solely motivated by the desire to deliver a safer and higher level of care!

Even, at my age, if it were physically and financially possible for me to jump that hurdle and attain the BSN, its still not worth it. I won't get a job. The wet behind the ear new grad will. Because new grad rates are the same, BSN or no BSN. It has nothing to do with education, skill, experience, judgment, critical thinking, seasoned status, novice status, etc....The company will ALWAYS extend the cheapest rate of pay that the nurse will accept, years of experience be damned. If I had $5 for every job ad that states "New grads welcome" I'd be rich. I've been forced into taking jobs paying less today than I earned 15 years ago. That's been the goal all along. 

Don't even get me started about the major hospital system in my area, and all the tricks they have to cherry pick new hires, from a well known astronomically priced 4 year BSN University. When their own clinical coordinators also work as clinical instructors at the university, in dual employment roles, its sort of hard not to see the fix. 

Edited by panurse9999

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Follower; 1,918 Visitors; 193 Posts

6 hours ago, Horseshoe said:

But it's impossible to feel fulfilled when you are completely over burdened with a workload that barely enables you to do the minimum, much less your best. The continuing trend of giving nurses more patients, with higher acuity, at the same time they are decreasing the numbers of ancillary staff who are crucial to enabling the nurses to provide safe and effective care is what is causing nurses to leave the profession in droves.

 

22 years ago I was a nurse. Today I am a box checker. There is no nursing. It will continue until the corporations that are spreading us too thin get sued out of existence.  Case in point HCR Manorcare, the nationwide skilled nursing chain, that went bankrupt. https://www.mcknights.com/news/hcr-manorcare-strategy-to-exit-bankruptcy-gets-ok-will-sell-74-facilities/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×