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Switch from AGPCNP to FNP? AGACNP? or ENP?

NP Students   (289 Views 10 Comments)
by kelsey939 kelsey939 (Member)

919 Visitors; 21 Posts

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So, I am looking for some advice!

I have been an ER nurse for about 5 years (3 at a large level 1 trauma center and 2 as a travel nurse). Last August, I started the AGPCNP program at a local university with relatively inexpensive tuition. I thought that I may want to do primary care or oncology. However, since transitioning from full time ER nurse to part time ER nurse and part time oncology and outpatient float pool nurse (and also completing one clinical rotation in primary care), I have realized that I really miss working with pediatrics and I am now very certain that I would like to stay as a provider in urgent care or an ER or fast track setting. I'm wondering what the best move would be at this point? I have 3 more semesters (a summer, fall, and spring) and will be done with this program next May. My current program will not allow me to switch to the FNP program. Does it make sense to finish this out and then do a post masters FNP or ENP? Or should I cut my losses, transfer whatever credits I can to an FNP or FNP/ENP program? And would that even be the best option? It seems like the majority of the jobs I would be interested in require the FNP so I'm not sure that an AGACNP would even make sense. I could also potentially see myself as a hospitalist, however, that would not be my ideal job and I have no interest in ever working in an ICU. Any thoughts or past experiences with this?

 

Thanks in advance!

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FullGlass has 1 years experience as a BSN, MSN and works as a Adult and Geriatric Primary Care NP.

5 Followers; 1 Article; 6,448 Visitors; 640 Posts

Just finish your current program, then do a post-master's certificate to earn an FNP.  The certificate won't require many classes.  That way, you can work at least part-time to defray the cost of the certificate.  As an AGPCNP you can see adolescents ages 13-14 and up.  Good luck.

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919 Visitors; 21 Posts

Would it not be difficult to find a job as a new grad AGPCNP that would give me a flexible enough schedule to complete the clinical hours required for a post masters certificate?  We are willing to move anywhere (within reason) after I graduate, but it just seems like a lot of the AGPCNP jobs are M-F 9-5 which seems like it would be difficult and most of the PRN jobs want previous NP experience, which makes sense.

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FullGlass has 1 years experience as a BSN, MSN and works as a Adult and Geriatric Primary Care NP.

5 Followers; 1 Article; 6,448 Visitors; 640 Posts

1 hour ago, kelsey939 said:

Would it not be difficult to find a job as a new grad AGPCNP that would give me a flexible enough schedule to complete the clinical hours required for a post masters certificate?  We are willing to move anywhere (within reason) after I graduate, but it just seems like a lot of the AGPCNP jobs are M-F 9-5 which seems like it would be difficult and most of the PRN jobs want previous NP experience, which makes sense.

There are part time jobs available.  In addition, some clinics offer 4 10-hour days.

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10,603 Visitors; 963 Posts

I just have an opposite opinion. If you are certain that you would rather have FNP then why would you waste not only another year and financial burden getting a certification that you have no intention using?  And if you are using student loans for your education it makes little sense to accrue that debt just to turn around and take on additional debt for a post masters certification. 

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919 Visitors; 21 Posts

It seems as though most FNP programs will only accept about 6-9 of my 21 credits, unfortunately. I am not taking any debt out with my current program but I will be losing out on another year of full time nursing salary since I’m only working part time right now. It just seems like the post-masters certificates are so inconsistent. Some things I have read say they can take 1-2 years to complete! 

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FullGlass has 1 years experience as a BSN, MSN and works as a Adult and Geriatric Primary Care NP.

5 Followers; 1 Article; 6,448 Visitors; 640 Posts

20 minutes ago, kelsey939 said:

It seems as though most FNP programs will only accept about 6-9 of my 21 credits, unfortunately. I am not taking any debt out with my current program but I will be losing out on another year of full time nursing salary since I’m only working part time right now. It just seems like the post-masters certificates are so inconsistent. Some things I have read say they can take 1-2 years to complete! 

That seems odd.  The only things you will need for the FNP are peds and some additional women's health.  So you need 1 peds clinical rotation and 1 women's health clinical rotation, plus the didactic material relevant to those.  

As for time, it will depend on your schedule and how fast you can complete the classes.

I suggest doing a cost-benefit analysis of dropping your current program and enrolling in an FNP program vs completing your program and doing a post-master's certificate.  

1.  Cost of each alternative

2.  Time required to complete each alternative

3.  Earnings potential while completing each alternative.  You can be working as an AGPCNP while you complete the FNP.

Good luck.

 

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umbdude has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a RN. PMHNP student.

2 Followers; 13,907 Visitors; 874 Posts

16 hours ago, kelsey939 said:

It seems as though most FNP programs will only accept about 6-9 of my 21 credits, unfortunately. I am not taking any debt out with my current program but I will be losing out on another year of full time nursing salary since I’m only working part time right now. It just seems like the post-masters certificates are so inconsistent. Some things I have read say they can take 1-2 years to complete! 

Most schools will not accept too many transfer credits from another school because it doesn't make financial sense for them. Why would the school go through all the trouble of placing a transfer student just so it can glean 1 year of tuition?

Since you only have 1 year to go, I think the best (least complicated) option is to finish your current program. Once you become an AGPCNP, there are many post-master FNP programs out there that you can do in a year (as few as 2 semesters, 12 credits). You'll probably have to find your own preceptors though.

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FullGlass has 1 years experience as a BSN, MSN and works as a Adult and Geriatric Primary Care NP.

5 Followers; 1 Article; 6,448 Visitors; 640 Posts

On 5/17/2019 at 6:09 AM, umbdude said:

Most schools will not accept too many transfer credits from another school because it doesn't make financial sense for them. Why would the school go through all the trouble of placing a transfer student just so it can glean 1 year of tuition?

Since you only have 1 year to go, I think the best (least complicated) option is to finish your current program. Once you become an AGPCNP, there are many post-master FNP programs out there that you can do in a year (as few as 2 semesters, 12 credits). You'll probably have to find your own preceptors though.

Finding a preceptor should not be too hard for a practicing NP.  An NP working in a larger clinic may already be working with a Peds and/or Women's Health provider.  An NP working in general primary care is also going to be making referrals to an Ob/Gyn and can develop some contacts in that space.  Work to develop relationships with other providers to develop a network of potential preceptors or people who know possible preceptors.  Also, attend local NP association meetings to do some networking.

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umbdude has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a RN. PMHNP student.

2 Followers; 13,907 Visitors; 874 Posts

27 minutes ago, FullGlass said:

Finding a preceptor should not be too hard for a practicing NP.  An NP working in a larger clinic may already be working with a Peds and/or Women's Health provider.  An NP working in general primary care is also going to be making referrals to an Ob/Gyn and can develop some contacts in that space.  Work to develop relationships with other providers to develop a network of potential preceptors or people who know possible preceptors.  Also, attend local NP association meetings to do some networking.

That's a good point.

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