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mmshad1000 mmshad1000 (New Member) New Member

Sumner College ADN Grads input

Oregon   (2,895 Views 5 Comments)
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I'm looking at applying to Sumner College. The program is fairly new and I'm looking for any input from past Sumner College grads. What did you like about the program, what would you change? Also once out on school did you have any trouble getting hired or transfering your credits?

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Pros: I like that the program is small and, because it is in a non-traditional environment, it is overall a calm environment. It is easy to qualify for and receive their quarterly scholarship, which takes $500 - $1000 off your tuition up to three times throughout the program. It is easy to get a hold of the person who you need to talk to (financial aid, administration) and get answers to questions and/or help. I'm really glad we don't take a summer break. It's a lot of work, but I'm glad just to power through and keep my education going. They work REALLY HARD with you to make sure you understand the material and pass. They will intervene actively first. They transferred in my credits. We are only in educational courses usually (rarely 4) days a week 8am to 2pm (not including clinical). The instructors are dedicated and knowledgeable. WGU, Linfield, and a number of other RN to BSN programs that are CCNE accept the credits.

Cons: They are not a big university or well-established CC; you do not have access to a school gym, health services, student insurance, local discounts - all of those extra little perks. The lab equipment is often outdated, does not work, or isn't available. The clinical sites are sub-par (it's hard in an over-saturated area of nursing schools to land a good clinical site as a for-profit school). You won't qualify for hardly any outside scholarships because they are a for-profit school. Some nurses, health systems, and schools will make you feel inadequate because you went to a for-profit school. As a grad, you are generally not hirable in OHSU or the VAs health systems, as well as government jobs until you complete your BSN with a CCNE (which is easy and doable). Communication within the school with students is terrible. You have to stay organized, on your toes, and be your own advocate. They don't go out of their way to do accommodate students in any way. They are a business. But the education is on point.

In general, don't stress about "how much money" it is. It has been my experience that local students that go to Oregon community colleges are still taking out huge cost-of-living loans, failing out, or are automatically enrolled in Linfield's ADN to BSN and end up paying a similar amount anyway (if you are comparing to doing Sumner's ADN to WGU's BSN total). For me, the timing was perfect. I could have waiting another 7 months to start with the next cycle of CC programs (IF I got in) - but instead I will be almost a year ahead of those students in my career and be able to use additional income to pay towards my student loans.

Job placement isn't really isn't an issue - grads are getting hired at large hospitals, SNFs, specialty areas, medical offices right out of the program. Legacy and Providence are standoff-ish but have hired one grad each. Sumner puts a lot of pressure on ADN students because we have a lot to prove coming from a for-profit, new program. We do more clinical hours, more paperwork, and more NCLEX prep than the average program. I feel good about the education being provided. For the most part, it doesn't matter where you go because it's up to you to either learn or skate through.

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I graduated from the RN program at Sumner and feel that I am as skilled as BSN level nurses that I work with on a daily basis. I am currently in a RN to BSN bridge program at American Sentinel University. My credits transferred from Sumner. The program at Sumner is hard, but the administration and the faculty will work with you and support you to help you succeed. I would recommend this program to anyone interested in nursing school. I took prerequisites for 2 years before I heard about Sumner and was able to transfer some of those classes into the program. I do wish I would have heard of Sumner before I spent so much time at a community college. As far as being hired after you graduate, you will be able to find a job. I was offered a job at the same place that I completed my practicum the week I graduated, and was also offered another position that same week. Someone mentioned Providence in a comment and I do have a friend who recently graduated from the RN program at Sumner as well and was just hired by them and offered a spot in their new graduate residency program. I will be done with my BSN in the next year and I feel like I am so far ahead of where I would be if I had not decided to attend Sumner.

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Hi Alex 1985B-

Can I ask what your TEAS score was?

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I graduated from the LPN program and was offered a job at my externship site the week before I graduated. I applied for the RN program in 2016 and was accepted and finished the program this past year. I was offered a position as a registered nurse at the hospital I completed my practicum. Sumner College is a great school and I have nothing but positive things to say about the education I received. The program is hard, but I passed the NCLEX after just 80 questions, and the school reimbursed me the costs to take the exam. I have referred 3 co-workers to the program over the past few years, and I have requested to precept future Sumner students. The financial aid department explains everything in detail so you do not have to stress about that part of nursing school. I also thought the administration was very supportive during my time at the school.

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