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Students getting kicked out of Dade Medical College & Keiser?

Posted

Specializes in LTC, hospice, home health.

Someone told me yesterday that students are getting kicked out of these schools due to nonpayment of monthly installments. If they miss three payments, they're out of the program-eventhough they already took out loans. This is insanity! :uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3:

What is your opinion on this?

ADeks

Specializes in Current: ER Past: Cardiac Tele. Has 3 years experience.

Well, if they took out loans then why couldn't they pay for their classes?

Bebet39

Specializes in LTC, hospice, home health.

Well, that's precisely the point. If one takes out a loan that means the individual has no money in the first place. Just because you take out doesn't mean you have money. If you have to take out loans you have no business going to a particular school.

If you have to take out loans you have no business going to a particular school.

WHAT!!!!!! :eek::eek::eek:

Tons of people take out student loans. Doctors and Lawyers and just the average person who can't afford to pay for their education. Even if a person worked full-time while they went to school they still may need extra help. Kids, rent/mortage, child care, food, car insurance, car payment, gas, light bill, water bill, health insurance. It all adds up. I know since I have those expenses. I barely have any extra left to pay for school.

I do think that people have to think very carefully about which school they choose to attend. Is a 2yr nursing degree really worth 40k that some of these private schools charge? Its up to the individual to decide. Those people may have taken loans that only covered a portion of their tuition and needed to pay the rest out of pocket. Things happen, they could have lost a job or spouse who knows.

I however would never discourage anyone from attending a college because they dont have the money to pay for it and need to take a student loan. The key is to borrower wisely make sure that the education you get has the potential to lead to a Job that is worth the loan amount.

Edited by littlegirlblue

ZeppHead8

Has 1 years experience.

WHAT!!!!!! :eek::eek::eek:

Tons of people take out student loans. Doctors and Lawyers and just the average person who can't afford to pay for their education. Even if a person worked full-time while they went to school they still may need extra help. Kids, rent/mortage, child care, food, car insurance, car payment, gas, light bill, water bill, health insurance. It all adds up. I know since I have those expenses. I barely have any extra left to pay for school.

I do think that people have to think very carefully about which school they choose to attend. Is a 2yr nursing degree really worth 40k that some of these private schools charge? Its up to the individual to decide. Those people may have taken loans that only covered a portion of their tuition and needed to pay the rest out of pocket. Things happen, they could have lost a job or spouse who knows.

I however would never discourage anyone from attending a college because they dont have the money to pay for it and need to take a student loan. The key is to borrower wisely make sure that the education you get has the potential to lead to a Job that is worth the loan amount.

I wholeheartedly agree with you. As to the OP, however, a business without funds can't operate. It's sad to see someone lose a spot, yet it's a financial commitment, not just time and energy.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

Someone told me yesterday that students are getting kicked out of these schools due to nonpayment of monthly installments. If they miss three payments, they're out of the program-eventhough they already took out loans. This is insanity! :uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3::uhoh3:

What is your opinion on this?

Why would it be insanity? The school makes a deal with a student to provide the education and the student agrees to pay for it. If the student stops paying, then that student should expect the school to stop providing the education.

I don't see any insanity in that. No school that I know allows students to enroll for the next semester if they haven't paid their bills from the previous semester. Most schools kick you out of class if you don't pay your tuition in the first couple of weeks of the semester.

on eagles wings, ASN, RN

Specializes in SDU, Tele. Has 2 years experience.

that's not insanity, that's life.

Bebet39

Specializes in LTC, hospice, home health.

But these little private schools don't have semesters like a traditional college. They're over-priced and plus they have it where you have to take out the loan for the entire school year. Do they cancel these loans? After taking the loans, do they return the remaining amount back to the lender? Why is there a monthly payment after financial aid? These schools are too expensive versus the time (only a few months compared to a two or four year college).

Its not such a good deal. Is best to go to a community college where you get your monies worth. If nest semester you cannot attend for whatever apparent reason, you just don't register.

Edited by Bebet39
Forgot something.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

I'm not going to defend the for-profit schools in terms of their quality or ethics. I don't approve of them.

But if a student signs a contract saying that she will pay a certain amount of money in exchange for the education the school provides (however poor the quality of the education may be) ... that student should expect to have to pay the money to get the education. The student who expects the school to provide the education when they haven't paid the money is not being realistic.

Lesson: Don't sign a contract you are not prepared to live up to.

I feel sorry for the foolish students who got in over their heads ... and I support the federal government's efforts to reign in the for-profit schools. But the students bear some of the responsibility if they didn't expect to have to pay the money they agreed to pay.

It's a sad situation ... but one that is completely understandable and predictable.

Bebet39

Specializes in LTC, hospice, home health.

If an individual has a job promised to them after graduation and its a gurantee then they can go for it. But if there's no money, how will this individual pay the money back?

People lose their jobs sometimes without expecting it too, which makes it hard to pay a monthly installment.

Edited by Bebet39

If an individual has a job promised to them after graduation and its a gurantee then they can go for it. But if there's no money, how will this individual pay the money back?

People lose their jobs sometimes without expecting it too, which makes it hard to pay a monthly installment.

SOMEBODY pays the bill or the kids get kicked out: That's how it works in the USA. Higher ed is not free here.

There are good reasons for attending a private school or a for-profit, vs. a community college. One might be that there are 12 applicants for every RN seat in a community college, but the private school or the for-profit has seats open. Another might be that the student gets a more lucrative financial aid package by picking a high-priced school.

As for not having a job when you get out, that's just the way it works, sometimes. If you get out of school when the economy has tanked, and nobody's hiring, and there is also some peak level of new grads with that training, it might mean you take a job in something that's outside your field. Ideally, you look at that job market before you choose a major, and you keep tabs on it throughout school, and you bail out if it looks like there is no way that this can pay off financially for you. And if you take out loans, you have to pay them back. Don't take out a loan if you are unwilling to do whatever it may take to pay it back.