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Should I tell my nursing school about my disorder?

Posted

Hi, I am currently in nursing school with two semesters left (not counting the one I am currently in). I have been diagnosed with Narcolepsy about 4 years ago (before I even started nursing school). I have noticed that due to my disorder, I have been late to clinicals a couple of times (because it is so early and I have such a difficult time waking up). I set my alarm 2 hours before I even have to leave. Yes, I have medication to perk me back up when I am feeling really sleepy. This disorder is also covered by the ADA (American Disabilities Act). The other day, during the post-conference at clinical, I was resting my head against the headrest of the chair, still listening and rocking the chair back and forth, but closing my eyes because I was way sleepy. I noticed the clinical instructor making a point to watch me rest my eyes. I noticed it when I would open them up every couple of seconds. I wasn't falling asleep, but had a strong desire to just shut my eyes. So, after that, I am wondering if I should let my school know that I have this disorder. At first, I was worried that they may inhibit me from doing certain things, but since I have been at their school for almost 2 years, they would be able to look back at my track record and see that I've been doing extremely well, including my grades. So, should I tell my school about my disorder?

Thank you all!

4_Sq

Specializes in OR.

I think the question here is: Does my association limit nursing practice in any way once I am graduated?

The issue is your safety and the safety of your patients. I would first talk to my physician, so that I could be regulated on the best medication regime possible, and potential other treatment regime so that I would not become drowsy during school and then work.

I believe that being open & honest is always the best policy, but I would tread carefully before I disclose.

There are so many areas of nursing practice, you will be able to find your niche, maybe one that is geared more to a less critical area of practice, eg. Public Health vs. ER nursing

syckRN

Specializes in Emergency Department, House Supervisor. Has 15 years experience.

NO!

NO!

NO!

Take it from a bipolar nurse. Stigma is alive and well in nursing schools and BRNs. The next thing that will happen for you if you tell is that they will want to know if your are abusing stimulants to stay awake!

Trust SyckRN on this one

NO!

NO!

NO!

Take it from a bipolar nurse. Stigma is alive and well in nursing schools and BRNs. The next thing that will happen for you if you tell is that they will want to know if your are abusing stimulants to stay awake!

Trust SyckRN on this one

This person is right. I came to find out that the nursing admin. @ my school were some of the most judgmental and nasty people that I have ever met in my life. They try to make you think that they are looking out for you, but trust- they are not.

nurse0520

Has 1 years experience.

NO NO NO

I should have never told my school about my brain surgery as a child, nor my epilepsy as a child (the reason I had my brain surgery) The nursing instructors used that against me plus I was pregnant (and married) and the instuctors treated me like I was back in the stone age where women did not work while pregnant. They used both of these against me the entire time I was there. One of the instructors told me i should not become a nurse because of my brain surgery/epilepsy also by the way i have not had a seizure in 20 years!!!