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Should I still apply to an absn or do a 4 year?

I am a recent college grad. I majored in biology and my cGPA is a 3.18. My prerequisite GPA for the absn programs I’m interested in is around a 3.2. In college I participated in a lot of research, but did not gain any volunteer experience/shadowed a nurse/cna certification/EMT,etc. While I meet the min GPA for most schools (3.0) I know I’m not a competitive applicant. So, should I still apply to absn programs or apply to a 4 year? Or retake classes? My aunt is an RN and she said that I shouldn’t retake the prerequisites I didn’t do well in and should still apply. What do you guys think? Thanks!

Edited by Stressed1998

3 hours ago, Stressed1998 said:

I am a recent college grad. I majored in biology and my cGPA is a 3.18. My prerequisite GPA for the absn programs I’m interested in is around a 3.2. In college I participated in a lot of research, but did not gain any volunteer experience/shadowed a nurse/cna certification/EMT,etc. While I meet the min GPA for most schools (3.0) I know I’m not a competitive applicant. So, should I still apply to absn programs or apply to a 4 year? Or retake classes? My aunt is an RN and she said that I shouldn’t retake the prerequisites I didn’t do well in and should still apply. What do you guys think? Thanks!

Have you had jobs, in the past, that dealt with anything close to health?

Your GPAs aren't bad, but they're not stellar either. The good news is your degree is in a science field, so that's definitely a plus there! I think w/ ABSNs those programs are sometimes a bit more forgiving, especially if it's at a private institution. You might find some luck there whereas a 4 year program will probably have more applicants and tougher to get into.

I would say apply. See how it goes. You should also go out and get some volunteer experience in a healthcare setting, at the very least. Of course, you'll need to wait until after this whole COVID-19 situation gets better, but that would be step one. This way, if you do not make in the first time, at least you'll have some experience and that will count also.

Hold off on retakes. If after getting experience you still can't get in, then go and do retakes.

48 minutes ago, Mergirlc said:

Have you had jobs, in the past, that dealt with anything close to health?

Your GPAs aren't bad, but they're not stellar either. The good news is your degree is in a science field, so that's definitely a plus there! I think w/ ABSNs those programs are sometimes a bit more forgiving, especially if it's at a private institution. You might find some luck there whereas a 4 year program will probably have more applicants and tougher to get into.

I would say apply. See how it goes. You should also go out and get some volunteer experience in a healthcare setting, at the very least. Of course, you'll need to wait until after this whole COVID-19 situation gets better, but that would be step one. This way, if you do not make in the first time, at least you'll have some experience and that will count also.

Hold off on retakes. If after getting experience you still can't get in, then go and do retakes.

Well the research I aided in with last Summer had to do with the figuring out how a certain disease is transmitted and the research that I aided in this past semester was focused on the mechanism of copper resistance in E.coli so, while not directly related to health, the findings/aims of these two research projects do have public health/health implications. I guess the Summer research project was a job since I was paid.

Thanks! Based on your response and the other response, I think I’ll just apply and see how it goes. COVID-19 definitely makes things a little more difficult/up in the air.

Thank you

2 hours ago, anewmanx said:

Listen to your aunt.

Thanks!

1 hour ago, Stressed1998 said:

Well the research I aided in with last Summer had to do with the figuring out how a certain disease is transmitted and the research that I aided in this past semester was focused on the mechanism of copper resistance in E.coli so, while not directly related to health, the findings/aims of these two research projects do have public health/health implications. I guess the Summer research project was a job since I was paid.

Thanks! Based on your response and the other response, I think I’ll just apply and see how it goes. COVID-19 definitely makes things a little more difficult/up in the air.

Thank you

The research projects you have done will definitely work in your favor, but getting hands-on experience would be ideal. Nursing is about interactions with people - various people from all walks of life. Volunteering in some capacity will show this and expose you to the inner workings of a hospital.

Most volunteer experiences revolve around checking on patients, guiding patients, or offering information or activities for patients. Some schools actually require you to have this type of experience, so keep this in mind.

Good luck to you!

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

You might also look at ADN programs that have special agreements with BSN schools. For example, I teach part time in on online BSN program in which many of the students are concurrently enrolled in an ADN program. Most are students such as yourself -- with degrees in other fields. The take their clinical courses at any community college in the state -- and simultaneously take online classroom courses in "my" BSN program.

After about 18 months of full-time study, they qualify to graduate from the ADN program and take the NCLEX-RN. At that point, they usually only need 2 or 3 courses that they take online at the BSN program to complete their BSNs.

So they are taking most of the classes through their local community college and paying the cheaper community college rates. After less than 2 years, they can practice as a nurse while they finish up the few remaining BSN degree from a respectable state supported university.

Not every state has that program of course, but I have heard of other programs that offer some special deals and programs for 2nd degree students combining a "fast track" through an ADN program (for the clinical courses) and an online BSN completion program to end up with a BSN spending less time and money than a traditional BSN program.

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