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Should I go Straight to RN School Following Graduation?

LPN-RN   (1,531 Views | 9 Replies)
by lvn082017 lvn082017 (New) New

339 Profile Views; 6 Posts

What should I do?

  1. 1. What should I do?

    • 5
      Go back
    • 1
      Wait a year

6 members have participated

Greetings,

I am currently a LVN/LPN student and I will be graduating next month. I have enjoyed my experience in LVN school and can't wait to apply myself and continue learning in my field.

The ADN program at my school only accepts new students once a year and if I want to become an RN (which is my next goal) I would have to apply within the next two months. I only have a few prereqs to finish but I can apply while those classes are in progress. I am being told left and right both that I should go straight back to get accepted in the next class as well as I should maybe wait a year and gain some experience and then apply next year (which is what I really want to do).

I really want to be a competent nurse but I fear that working as an LVN will interfere with what I've freshly learned in LVN school Vs What I will be learning in RN school. People keep telling me that I can do it, that I can tackle NCLEX, plus taking the HESI, PLUS passing the few classes I have but I am extremely worried that I may fail NCLEX trying to study for hesi/classes and vice versa.

I don't know what to do, I have no problem waiting a year and coming back because I love school, but I fear that I may need a break from school and work in my profession so that I can do well in RN school. Please, any advice is appreciated !

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5 Followers; 37,760 Posts; 104,843 Profile Views

Sounds like you need a break from school.

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6 Posts; 339 Profile Views

Sounds like you need a break from school.

I believe I do as well, everyone is tellljng me I'll get comfortable but I don't think I will. I want to go back but I also want to work as an LVN for a bit. I'm a bit torn.

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23 Posts; 737 Profile Views

Realistically either choice you make will be ok. I think that continuing right into an RN program would be the better choice because your already in the flow of things with studying ect. Plus, the second year is going to build upon the first year and those things will be fresh in your mind. Good Luck!

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FavoredLPN2BSN-RN is a ADN, BSN, LPN and specializes in Apheresis, Bone Marrow Transplant, Dialysis,.

32 Posts; 1,051 Profile Views

You have to do what's best for you. It sounds like you know what that is, but you're letting the chatter from others cloud your judgement. You can get complacent as an LPN, but you can also get right back in the saddle. Only YOU know what you can handle. If you are going back then you can't fail the NCLEX and you need to pass your other classes with good grades so that you keep your GPA up. I have my opinion, but it doesn't matter, yours is the only one that counts. Good luck!

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6 Posts; 339 Profile Views

Realistically either choice you make will be ok. I think that continuing right into an RN program would be the better choice because your already in the flow of things with studying ect. Plus, the second year is going to build upon the first year and those things will be fresh in your mind. Good Luck!

Thank you for your advice, I will try to make a sound decision within the next few weeks!

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Silverdragon102 has 32 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC.

8 Followers; 1 Article; 39,282 Posts; 146,035 Profile Views

threads merged

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1 Post; 120 Profile Views

Personally I've seen many nurses do either or. The LVN/LPN programs are difficult and a lot of "new beginnings". It may be wise to take a break from going back right away just for the fact that you may get burnt out easily. Or you may not and may just take off full swing. I am choosing to take a break after my program to work as becoming an experienced nurse rather than a brand new nurse. There is no time limit so take your time either way.

Good Luck with whatever you decide to choose!

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lindseylpn has 12 years experience.

420 Posts; 8,510 Profile Views

I think most of the LPN-RN programs near me require one year of practice as an LPN before you can transition. Several of the people I went to LPN school with worked and did their prerequisites in that year wait.

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CardiacDork has 5 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in ICU.

1 Follower; 3 Articles; 577 Posts; 18,158 Profile Views

Go for it. Don't stop now. Give it your all. Just go for it.

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