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Should I bring a lawyer when I go in front of the board?

Criminal   (1,266 Views | 4 Replies)
by arlenejross arlenejross (New) New

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Hello, I am a nursing student who is trying to get my CNA. I will be sitting for my NCLEX this summer and want to become a RN then. I have a criminal history with about 4 things from about 11+ years ago. I assume that I will be called in front of the board. Does anyone know if, when I do go before them, should I bring a lawyer? I am not sure exactly what a lawyer will do but want to be as prepared as possible. I actually called my family's lawyer to ask and he suggested I post here and ask if anyone knows or has had a similar experience or advice. I live in Maryland. Thanks!

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4 Followers; 37,651 Posts; 102,751 Profile Views

Suggest you do some research on the website of NSO. They provide good advice. Also suggest you speak to an attorney with experience dealing with nursing boards. You can find one on the referral service of the TAANA website. In general, it is wise to have legal representation when dealing with the board for legal matters involving your license. nso dot com taana dot org

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Meriwhen is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

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Without reading any more than the subject line on the thread...the answer is YES. If you ever go in front of the BON for ANY reason whatsoever, have a lawyer with you if at all possible. Preferably one experienced in nursing legal issues, but IMO any lawyer is better than no lawyer at all.

The BON is NOT your friend. Their primary concern is the safety of the public first and foremost; the nurse's concerns come second, if at all. If you go before them, you need someone with you who will put your interests first and foremost...and that is your lawyer.

Now that I've read the post...it may be possible that you won't have to appear in front of them. When you send in your applications, be sure to supply all the information that they ask for, and if they request supplemental information, don't hesitate to get it to them. Also submit as much supporting evidence as possible (e.g., letters of reference, courses completed related to your crimes such as driving safety school, anger management course, whatever) to show them that you have learned from this.

Best of luck in getting your certificate and license!

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42 Posts; 2,129 Profile Views

Yes, you need an attorney that specializes in representing people with professional medical licensure.

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