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Scared/feel unprepared for CRNA school?

SRNA   (659 Views 8 Comments)
by Rnso Rnso (New Member) New Member

261 Visitors; 9 Posts

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Hey guys, would love input from current SRNAs and CRNAs. I was recently accepted into an anesthesia program and I'll be starting this may. As excited as I am, I'm also very nervous. I feel like I won't know much. I won't be able to pick up all of the material. I won't be able keep up with everyone. I've had great ICU experience but maybe it's not enough? Did you guys feel the same way? If so, did you do anything to prepare before starting? Does it all come back to you? Please, any input helps! This is something I've always wanted to do and I'm prepared to put in the hours but then also as I get closer to start date, I get more nervous and worry that I might be making the wrong move. 

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1,129 Visitors; 56 Posts

You're not alone. I had 4.5 years of experience in a busy procedural unit, doing conscious sedation, and will have 5 years in the ICU by the time I start in January, and as much as I'm excited for school, I'm terrified. I'm also selling my house and moving the wife and I across the country to go to school, so the pressure is real. My coworker who is starting this summer also feels nervous, so I'd say it's fairly common. I made sure to choose a school with a low attrition rate and that openly discussed their support for students during interviews, so I think trusting the process and track record of your program is important. As my program director told me when asked what I can do to be a better candidate the following year if I don't get accepted, "if you weren't good enough, you wouldn't have been invited to interview in the first place." 

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261 Visitors; 9 Posts

8 hours ago, jmelinte said:

You're not alone. I had 4.5 years of experience in a busy procedural unit, doing conscious sedation, and will have 5 years in the ICU by the time I start in January, and as much as I'm excited for school, I'm terrified. I'm also selling my house and moving the wife and I across the country to go to school, so the pressure is real. My coworker who is starting this summer also feels nervous, so I'd say it's fairly common. I made sure to choose a school with a low attrition rate and that openly discussed their support for students during interviews, so I think trusting the process and track record of your program is important. As my program director told me when asked what I can do to be a better candidate the following year if I don't get accepted, "if you weren't good enough, you wouldn't have been invited to interview in the first place." 

Thank you, def makes me feel a little better that it's just not me lol. Am I crazy though for planning on buying two investment properties before I start?! Lol 

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245 Visitors; 29 Posts

I would also add that when you applied to nursing school you had no idea what to expect. You lacked the clinical knowledge and training to function as an RN and look at you know, you have a BSN, you worked critical care and successfully gained admission into one of the most competitive fields in the country. You must be doing something right. Trust your instincts, manage your time, and enjoy the last few months of freedom you have before you enter the whirlwind of CRNA school. I start school in August of this year and yes I feel the crunch primarily because of everything I have read about the "nightmare" that it is but not so much by virtue of direct experience. I find that fear by proxy is worse than what you fear itself. We made it to the next phase, we'll be fine!

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171 Visitors; 3 Posts

I just started my first semester this Jan 2019. I had asked everyone currently in the program if they did anything to prepare themselves for the rigorous studies and they all said the same thing, "enjoy the time you have." Even my academic advisor told me to just focus on the semester at hand and take it one at a time. You got this! =)

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261 Visitors; 9 Posts

Thank you guys so much! Definitely feels so much better knowing I'm not in this alone. Was almost going to rethink this whole thing! Lol 

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ProgressiveThinking has 7 years experience and works as a SRNA.

12,493 Visitors; 354 Posts

All of your classmates will feel like they're on the same boat as you. If your program accepted you, they think you're going do well. They don't accept people that they do not think will pass. The more people they fail out, the higher their attrition rate. A high attrition rate looks bad and can potentially result in students not wanting to apply to there program which has all sorts of ramifications (lower caliber students being accepted which ruins their reputation, less applicants, less $$$ for them, etc). That's not to say that some students won't fail out. Some do, but they do for all sorts of reasons (family, financial issues, change of heart).

 A lot of schools even work with students who are struggling academically as long as they put the work in and stay in contact with their professors. You're going to do fine as long as you put in the work. Relax, and enjoy your time before you start school. Everything you need to know will be taught to you.

Edited by ProgressiveThinking

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DreameRN has 10 years experience as a BSN.

3,637 Visitors; 86 Posts

I felt the same exact way. I felt like I had somehow fooled them and I was not going to be up to the task. I even failed my first quiz in the program and I was terrified. However, I'm almost completed with my first year now, and I have pulled all As. It's just day by day building confidence, learning the material, learning how you study best, and putting in the time.  I can also tell you my professors are extremely supportive. They want us to succeed and want us to learn. So they'll answer any questions, any email to the best they can, and have stated many times that if we are struggling, let them know and they'll help us.  Makes for a very safe learning environment.  

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