Jump to content

a.s or b.s

Posted

Hey guys,

I'm sure this question has been asked hundreds of times, but what is the best route to be an RN? I already have a BS in sociology. The AS is quicker and if I want, I can get my masters at NYU later on with a AS in nursing and a BS in any other field. What's the general opinion?

Hey guys,

I'm sure this question has been asked hundreds of times, but what is the best route to be an RN? I already have a BS in sociology. The AS is quicker and if I want, I can get my masters at NYU later on with a AS in nursing and a BS in any other field. What's the general opinion?

It all depends on where you are living and the type of programs that are available in your area. You may find that an accelerated program would be the quikest for you, as they usually don't have a two year waiting list.

If you are talking about the NY area, check with Stony Brook........they have exceptionally good programs, but I believe both are already full for this fall.

Try checking with some of the private colleges in the area if time is the most important to you.

Hope that this helps............remember that it doesn't matter where you do your training at, or how long it took you to do it, you still sit for the same NCLEX exam, and get the same RN once you pass your exam.

Good luck.................. :)

I am in an accelerated BSN program right now and it was my quickest option. In the two years that it would take to get an AS degree, I will be getting a BSN. One year was to pick up the additional preq. science courses (Chem, AP I and II, Bioethics, ...), the second year in the BSN program. And that is assuming I got into the ADN program. The waiting lists at the community colleges can be quite long.

The ABSN is a ball-buster of a program (Fairleigh Dickinson Univ.). I have been going to school flat out since last May, upto 20 credits per semester. So don't think that you will be able to work and go to school at the same time. No one who tried are still with us.

So if your goal is a MSN degree and if you can get into an ADN program right away, that may be your most sanest way to do it. Be certain of the MSN preq.

Carl

I am in an accelerated BSN program right now and it was my quickest option. In the two years that it would take to get an AS degree, I will be getting a BSN. One year was to pick up the additional preq. science courses (Chem, AP I and II, Bioethics, ...), the second year in the BSN program. And that is assuming I got into the ADN program. The waiting lists at the community colleges can be quite long.

The ABSN is a ball-buster of a program (Fairleigh Dickinson Univ.). I have been going to school flat out since last May, upto 20 credits per semester. So don't think that you will be able to work and go to school at the same time. No one who tried are still with us.

So if your goal is a MSN degree and if you can get into an ADN program right away, that may be your most sanest way to do it. Be certain of the MSN preq.

Carl

ABSN, MSN, ADN? Can you please explain the abbreviations, I'm new. Thanks!

personally i don't think there is any "best" route.. it depends on you, where you are in your life, what you can afford to sacrifice to go to school, etc.. I mean, will you able to work and go to school, are you able to go full time or part time only, how soon do you want to finish, how much $$ to you want to spend to get your degree, etc. In the end, you sit for the same boards and have the same RN license as any other...the thing to do is look further down the line and investigate what and where you want to be in the next 5-7 years, and determine what kind of credenitals you will need to accomplish that. then you can decide which route will be best for you--some are ok being an RN-AD and that's it-- if you want to get into nrsg management, you'll most likely need a more advanced degree, at least a BS of some kind...and for higher administrative stuff, you'll need the MSN.. there are programs now, with the nursing shortage, where you can even go straight from ADN RN to MSN, but lots of fine lines to read... just eval your goals and then decide.. Oh---and one final word--- an accelerated BSN program for someone who has a BS already but no prior nursing experience might be tough not only in school, but once you get out, you may wish you had much more time devoted to developing clinical skills-- it's been not only my observation but the consensus of many nurse managers and faculty members, etc that ADN trained nurses often have more intensive time devoted to clinical skills whereas BSN trained nurses have more time devoted to developing the management/organizational/etc side of nursing (don't beat me up guys--just my opinion and observation)

ABSN, MSN, ADN? Can you please explain the abbreviations, I'm new. Thanks!

Sorry about that.

ABSN: Accelerated bachlor of science - nursing

MSN: Master of science - nursing

ADN: Associate degree - nursing

With regard to ABSN clinical experience, I would have to agree that I would have liked to develop my clinical skills more. I am not sure, however, if I received any fewer clinical hours than an ADN graduate. During my past year I have had 6 clinicals, 3 med-surg, 1 peds, 1 ob, and 1 community health. Each 1 day a week for a full semester.

Some of my instructors commented on that and said that after about six months any clinical experience advantage disappears. But of course, take that with a grain of salt :) .

Carl

Where I go to school the local Community College has a special arrangment with the local University. Once you get your ADN and if you pass you NCLEX then you can buy a certain number of credits towards a BSN at the University and puts you that much closer. I am looking at getting an advanced degree beyond that because I have a family to feed I am going for the ADN first.

Plus the amount of cash I will save will be tremendous by going this route :)

Rock, LPN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Derm,Eye,Ortho,Prison,Surg,Med,. Has 50 years experience.

TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION, ASN (associate degree in nursing), BSN (baccalaureate degree in nursing), MSN (master of scicence, nursing)

There is a school in Manhattan, and one in NJ, that will allow you to take a one year accelerated course for LPN, work as a licensed nurse, and return after six (6) months experience to take the second year of training for RN.

If interested, I will supply you with the information.

Rock

:rotfl: :chuckle

Rock, LPN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Derm,Eye,Ortho,Prison,Surg,Med,. Has 50 years experience.

There Is Also Another School In Westchester That Gives You A Msn In Two Years With Any Baccalaureate.

There Is Also Another School In Westchester That Gives You A Msn In Two Years With Any Baccalaureate.

I lsee you live in Staten Island, as do I. What are the better programs? CSI? NYU?

Rock, LPN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Derm,Eye,Ortho,Prison,Surg,Med,. Has 50 years experience.

I lsee you live in Staten Island, as do I. What are the better programs? CSI? NYU?

There are three (3) programs on S.I., College of S.I. (2 years and 4 years), St. Vincent's School of Nursing and Wagner College.

St. Vincent's offers an Associate Degree in two (2) years,

Wagner College offers a Baccalaureate in four (4) years, but in your case, since you have all of your liberal arts courses, I believe for you it would only be two (2) years (the last two years of the program).

Pace University, Westchester, offered a MSN in two (2) years with any baccalaureate discipline. I'm not current with Pace any longer, and can't tell you if the program is still viable, but a simple phone call there will answer that question for you.

You will be given basic information no matter which school you select, it's up to you to build on that information as you hone your skills.

ROCK

GOOD LUCK !!!!

:chuckle

There are three (3) programs on S.I., College of S.I. (2 years and 4 years), St. Vincent's School of Nursing and Wagner College.

St. Vincent's offers an Associate Degree in two (2) years,

Wagner College offers a Baccalaureate in four (4) years, but in your case, since you have all of your liberal arts courses, I believe for you it would only be two (2) years (the last two years of the program).

Pace University, Westchester, offered a MSN in two (2) years with any baccalaureate discipline. I'm not current with Pace any longer, and can't tell you if the program is still viable, but a simple phone call there will answer that question for you.

You will be given basic information no matter which school you select, it's up to you to build on that information as you hone your skills.

ROCK

GOOD LUCK !!!!

:chuckle

I hear a lot of horror stories about people not getting into these programs. With the shortage and all, is this true?

Rock, LPN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Derm,Eye,Ortho,Prison,Surg,Med,. Has 50 years experience.

I hear a lot of horror stories about people not getting into these programs. With the shortage and all, is this true?

If you already have a baccalaureate degree, I doubt that you will have any trouble being admitted to any of the schools.

St Vincent's requires that you maintain a 70 average. Many more applicants are accepted than those who graduate, for a variety of reasons. Some drop out voluntarily, others can't keep up with the demands of the accelerated courses.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Good Luck !

:balloons: :Melody: :coollook:

If you already have a baccalaureate degree, I doubt that you will have any trouble being admitted to any of the schools.

St Vincent's requires that you maintain a 70 average. Many more applicants are accepted than those who graduate, for a variety of reasons. Some drop out voluntarily, others can't keep up with the demands of the accelerated courses.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Good Luck !

:balloons: :Melody: :coollook:

Thanks for the info. So I guess there really isn't any real benefit in going to, say, NYU for $60,000 vs. another school. An RN is an RN and you will be hired regardless of WHERE you get your degree, but rather on you as an individual.

Rock, LPN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Derm,Eye,Ortho,Prison,Surg,Med,. Has 50 years experience.

Thanks for the info. So I guess there really isn't any real benefit in going to, say, NYU for $60,000 vs. another school. An RN is an RN and you will be hired regardless of WHERE you get your degree, but rather on you as an individual.

Exactly correct. The hospitals only want to see your RN/LPN license. They don't look to see what school you came from.

When recruiting for Nurse Manager/Supervisor, a person with a baccalaureate degree would be given preference over a person with an associate degree.

Colleges are charging over $700 per credit, multiply that by 60 or 120. Unless you are independently wealthy, you would be paying some bank for many. many years.

St. Vincent School has a good pass record for taking State Boards on the first try.

Sincerely,

Rock :balloons:

Thanks for all you info, I appreciate it. Can I ask where you went to school?

Rock, LPN, RN

Specializes in Psych, Derm,Eye,Ortho,Prison,Surg,Med,. Has 50 years experience.

Thanks for all you info, I appreciate it. Can I ask where you went to school?

If you mean Rock, following is my c.v.:

Central School for LPN, Roosevelt Island, Now defunct

College of Staten Island, Associate in Arts

Albany State, Associate in Science, Nursing

College of Staten Island, Baccalaureate, Psychology/Sociology

St John's University, Master of Science, Education

Think St. Vincent School, Staten Island, Graduates have a good pass

rate on State Boards on the first try. Albany rates schools on the percentage of graduates passing State Boards on the first try.

St. Vincent offers an Associate degree in Nursing.

Rock

TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION, ASN (associate degree in nursing), BSN (baccalaureate degree in nursing), MSN (master of scicence, nursing)

There is a school in Manhattan, and one in NJ, that will allow you to take a one year accelerated course for LPN, work as a licensed nurse, and return after six (6) months experience to take the second year of training for RN.

If interested, I will supply you with the information.

Rock

:rotfl: :chuckle

Rock, Where in Manhattan is this school that you speak of? I live in Manhattan and I and have a BA in Teacher of Speech and Hearing Handicap I would LOVE to find out more about this school. Thanx.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.