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Ryan White HIV/AIDS Act Extended... eliminates travelers HIV entry ban

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Specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion. Has 43 years experience.

from the white house:

ryan white hiv/aids treatment extension act of 2009

honoring the legacy of ryan white

posted by jeffrey crowley on october 30, 2009 at 05:39 pm est

today, president obama signed the ryan white hiv/aids treatment extension act of 2009. it represents our ongoing commitment to ensuring access to needed hiv/aids care and treatment. the white house and the department of health and human services (hhs) worked very closely with congress on this bipartisan legislation, and the consensus document developed by the hiv/aids advocacy community was an important part of the process. we were so pleased that jeanne white-ginder, ryan white's mother, was here at the bill signing.

the ryan white program is the largest federal program specifically dedicated to providing hiv care and treatment. it funds heavily impacted metropolitan areas, states, and local community-based organizations to provide life-saving medical care, medications, and support services to more than half a million people each year: the uninsured and underinsured, racial and ethnic minorities, people of all ages.

the president also announced today the elimination of the hiv entry ban. since 1987, hiv-positive travelers and immigrants have been banned from entering or traveling through the united states without a special waiver. in july 2008, congress removed all legislative barriers to repealing the ban and paved the way for hhs to repeal the ban. a final rule will be published in the federal register on monday, november 2nd and will take effect in early january 2010. that means that people who have hiv and are not u.s. citizens will be able to enter the u.s. starting in january next year. this is a major step in ending the stigma associated with hiv....

jeffrey crowley is the director of the office of national aids policy and senior advisor on disability policy at the white house

Great, more freeloaders into and already broke the system.

piscesguy

Specializes in Hospice Volunteer.

Great, more freeloaders into and already broke the system.

That sentence makes no sense! I think I get what you're trying to say, but I have to respond that I think art of the "broke system" is a society putting money above all else. Did it occur to you that it's a human rights issue? It is.

That sentence makes no sense! I think I get what you're trying to say, but I have to respond that I think art of the "broke system" is a society putting money above all else. Did it occur to you that it's a human rights issue? It is.

It's actually a public health issue. Communicable diseases pose a health risk to the population at large. The government is charged with protecting it's citizens, not wondering whether or not they're treating travelers fairly.

With that said, AIDS is much more controlled these days. Someone once told me AIDS was the new diabetes, and that makes an odd kind of sense. I don't think it'll be very long until it wont be an issue anymore. The ban served a purpose in its day, but it's already run its course and is just outdated now. It was time to lift it.

of course the perversely humerous thing is that it only applied to the KNOWN positive.....

RNOkie

Specializes in med-surg. Has 15 years experience.

It's actually a public health issue. Communicable diseases pose a health risk to the population at large. The government is charged with protecting it's citizens, not wondering whether or not they're treating travelers fairly.

I totally agree. We have an obligation to protect our own.

of course the perversely humerous thing is that it only applied to the KNOWN positive.....

Well, considering there are only two groups of people. The known positive, and everyone. I think everyone would be a little extreme...

Well, considering there are only two groups of people. The known positive, and everyone. I think everyone would be a little extreme...

that be my point.....lol.....it provided minimal protection, if any.

that be my point.....lol.....it provided minimal protection, if any.

It's the same thing governments did by restricting access to people with H1N1 symptoms. It's just a precautionary measure in the interest of public safety. It doesn't guarantee anything, but it offers some protection, and there's nothing more you can do.