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Ripe for Exploitation

Nurses Article   (1,244 Views 16 Comments 1,423 Words)
by RobbiRN RobbiRN, RN (Member) Innovator

RobbiRN is a RN and works as a ER RN.

16 Articles; 9,935 Visitors; 170 Posts

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Nursing consistently tops the polls as the most trusted profession. In a cruel twist of irony, some of the same qualities that consistently win us first place on the most trusted chart also make us ripe for exploitation: We’re eighty-five percent female, programmed to please, and unlikely to fight back. You are reading page 2 of Ripe for Exploitation. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

51 Visitors; 8 Posts

Wow! yes and more yes!

 

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Eschell2971 has 4 years experience as a BSN and works as a RN.

10 Articles; 30,653 Visitors; 67 Posts

This is an interesting piece & some of which I heartily agree, especially noting that our profession of 85% women/female has a lot to do with many of our responses/or lack thereof, to the challenges we face. I regularly mention & advocate for my colleagues & encourage them to do the same, especially when it comes to staffing, workplace challenges, etc. I find it frustrating that many of my colleagues are afraid or passive when it comes to speaking up/standing together to be assertive.

I have even had a few colleagues tell me, "You're too aggressive, too political. I just want to come to work to do my job!" What they don't realize is that a huge part of their job is stacked against them, and this is a systems/systemic issue that they can not resolve by just 'doing their job.' They don't understand that in some instances, no matter what they do, the 'system' is stacked against them, already setting them up for failure & certainly to be the defacto nurse who gets blamed.

By the way, my response to my colleagues who say, "You're too aggressive/political," is always this: "I'm not aggressive; I'm assertive, and what you're experiencing is a form of cognitive dissonance because you're not used to a woman being assertive." I also explain to my colleagues that in general, men in the boardroom have zero problem being assertive and it's a non-issue for them to ask for what they want/need to make something happen.

Nurses should be no less assertive. We should take our cues from the C-suite executives (men & women) that we see postered on the walls of our places of employment. If we (women) want a place at the table, we certainly won't get there by waiting to be seated & we shouldn't be so giddy about receiving the crumbs & leftovers from the equisitely catered executive luncheons & dinners.

In my never to be humble opinion.

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51 Visitors; 8 Posts

Not to bring in politics but Hillary Clinton didn't win, bc Donald Trump was the bigger more aggressive! How do people not see this? If Hillary Clinton were to brag about grabbing men by their she would have been called all the names on the planet. Not to mention a Bi*ch! 

How is that politics? When people start waking up to realizing politics is a government, not the average person living the life they will start electing better people into government. WAKE UP, PEOPLE! VOTE! 

Health Care is not a political issue. It is a human rights issue. People who don't want to talk about the way nurses are treated and patients suffer bc nurses care but can't do anything about it should go to another career. Adversity is around us all. I agree that I don't like talking politics at work unless a patient wants to talk politics. But unless we talk about it nothing changes.

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RobbiRN is a RN and works as a ER RN.

16 Articles; 9,935 Visitors; 170 Posts

7 hours ago, scnurse83 said:

Health Care is not a political issue. It is a human rights issue. People who don't want to talk about the way nurses are treated and patients suffer bc nurses care but can't do anything about it should go to another career. Adversity is around us all. I agree that I don't like talking politics at work unless a patient wants to talk politics. But unless we talk about it nothing changes.

You're right that healthcare is primarily a human rights issue, and the rest of the industrialized world treats it as such. Only the U.S. makes healthcare a commodity, a business issue, with rampant profiteering enabled by immoral politicians. Conservatively, 50,000 people die annually here because they can't buy what they need. A compliant nursing profession is an integral part of leading the lambs to the slaughter.

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