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Resume and Cover Letter Critique

New York   (1,492 Views | 4 Replies)

282 Profile Views; 16 Posts

Hi,

I'm a new grad looking for a job in the city. I attached a resume and cover letter (without sensitive information). I had an older fashion resume but someone helped me make a new one. I'm not sure which one is more intriguing to hospitals. Can anyone critique them? From any nurses, recruiters, or nurse managers, etc. Thanks!

Cover Letter.docx

Older Resume.docx

 

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1 Post; 8 Profile Views

Great job on your resume. I know it is blank at the moment, but if you are planning on putting your address don't for safety purposes. I wish you the best of luck on your new journey, and I hope you hear an amazing job offer soon!

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16 Posts; 282 Profile Views

Hi,

Thank you! which resume do you think would be better? I had 2 forms 

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1 Follower; 2,330 Posts; 48,698 Profile Views

I would go with the older resume format.  In my opinion it looks more professional, and it is easier to read.  Also, some job search sites ask you to copy/paste your resume and this format might be best.

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Nurse Beth has 30 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Med Surg, Tele, ICU, Ortho.

18 Followers; 104 Articles; 2,096 Posts; 236,042 Profile Views

Congratulations on graduating!

 I have suggestions for you on both your cover letter and your resume. I want to help you stand out- that's the key to your success. As a new graduate without nursing experience, your strategy is to stand out among the multitude of equally inexperienced applicants.  

From your cover letter:

"This experience refined my autonomy, communication, and adaptability as care was provided independently. Numerous times I have gone out of the way to improve my patients’ quality of life while ensuring confidentiality"

So with all kindness, as a hiring nurse manager, this means nothing and the use of words such as "autonomy, communication, adaptability, confidentiality" sound inauthentic without context. It's white noise and it will not stick.

I know that's not your intention. To be more powerful, and to create a memorable impression (stand out!), try an example of how you go above and beyond to "improve your patients' quality of life".

For example: "My elderly patient, Lydia, was too confused to text or talk on the phone but kept asking about Chico, her dog. You could tell by her face she was upset. I asked the social worker for help in getting in touch with Lydia's caregiver, Ruby. Ruby took a picture of Chico contentedly napping and texted it to my phone. I showed the picture of Chico to Lydia and she was so happy and grateful. I'll never forget it. This is what I love about nursing".

Now when the recruiter and the nurse manager discuss your application they will remember you (the one with the picture of Chico) and they will associate you with warm, positive feelings.

You see, the purpose of a cover letter is to land you an interview. Make the most of it.

Best wishes! 🙂

 

 

 

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