Jump to content

Rehab? Asking for a future nurse

Recovery   (1,344 Views | 16 Replies)
by HiddenShadow20 HiddenShadow20 (New) New Pre-Student

120 Profile Views; 5 Posts

You are reading page 2 of Rehab? Asking for a future nurse. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

1 Follower; 1,835 Posts; 14,337 Profile Views

I wouldn’t tell those clowns anything.  That’s a question they shouldn’t be able to ask nor find out about without breaking a whole pile of laws pertaining to patient confidentiality.  You weren’t a nurse when you sought treatment and so long as there is no public records to access (criminal charges involuntary commitment).   It’s none of anybody’s business what your confidential medical records hold.  Get a lawyer and seek professional advice.  However the thought of someone stuck in one of these slimy money grabbing programs for seeking help before they became a nurse is vomit inspiring 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AnnaFender specializes in ER Trauma.

16 Posts; 107 Profile Views

If you were never charged with a crime and only went to rehab for alcohol addiction, then I wouldnt disclose that info at all.  Its protected information so do not disclose.  Listen, some may disagree but I fail to understand why nursing boards think it is necessary to disqualify individuals who are beautifully flawed human beings like the rest of society.  Only you know if you are actively struggling with anything that may impair your judgement.  You dont need to have some board member breathing down your neck for disclosing personal information if you are meeting the requirements of the nursing program.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KatEverly is a BSN and specializes in ABSN Grad w/ previous BA in Psych.

78 Posts; 365 Profile Views

I just had to come back and say something after reading the first couple of comments in this thread.
 

The BON has ways of finding out about addictions that lead to legal issues (Including a court order for psych treatment). That’s it. You have the SAME HIPAA rights to privacy as anybody else we care for. The BON can inquire about your medical history, but they can’t force you to disclose and it is unethical for them or anybody else to even suggest that they can. 

If you or anybody else is struggling in getting or maintaining sobriety, I really recommend SMART Recovery (smartrecovery.org). I actually run Zoom meetings online there on Saturday nights at 10pm, and attendees can be remain anonymous. 

If these issues are behind you, do yourself a favor and practice good self-care by maintaining the privacy that you are morally and legally afforded. People get better every day from both addictive habits and psychological disturbances. You need not carry the scarlet letter around about it for the rest of your life nor be bullied into a state recovery program that will have huge implications on your professional career and cost you upwards of $20k. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AnnaFender specializes in ER Trauma.

16 Posts; 107 Profile Views

I couldnt agree more but I have read lots of testimony from nurses who continue to be penalized by the BON and/or post in their newsletters who is in the CANDO program.  That is wrong in my opinion. Or publish who has had infractions placed on their license.  The only people who need to know this are employers who can check status online.  Its public humiliation and its damaging to the profession as a whole.  Like I've said before...it encourages lack of disclosure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MSRN2020 has 2 years experience.

16 Posts; 909 Profile Views

On 1/5/2020 at 8:00 AM, rn1965 said:

Please CONSULT an attorney.  My advise, if you are healthy and looking after your sobriety, DO NOT SAY A THING.  Look at the recovery forum.  It will cost you thousands of dollars to complete the monitoring, and will take longer for you to sit for NCLEX and obtain your license.

Just my 2 cents.  Congratulations on your health and sobriety and on becoming a nurse!

I'm going with this reply- Do NOT say a thing. If you are in recovery now and everything is good, there's no need to say anything. You WILL end up in a monitoring program and it's going to cost a lot of time, money, energy, and cause a lot of unnecessary anxiety.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.