Average Salary for ADN vs BSN - page 4

I know this will vary greatly by region, but what is the average pay for an entry-level nurse (right out of school) with an Associates in Nursing versus a Bachelors in Nursing? Has anyone found that... Read More

  1. by   TessaW
    I got my ADN to start...hopefully I will find a job that will help me get my BSN, eventually I want my MSN and possibly teaching after that. I just wish I was in a better position for finding a job right now.
  2. by   jxturner18
  3. by   Rick Walters
    In our hospital the starting pay is close 66k vs 68k (before differentials) however as you gain experience you will find that as a BSN you will make much more than the ADN. Top pay as a ASN is 88k while a BSN will make 117K. That is a very large incentive to continue on. We also get weekend diff's (25% for Saturday and 25% for Sunday).
  4. by   kay s
    hi everybody, I am in first year of nursing program and i was wondering if there is a pay difference if you have some specialities like cardiac nurse or oncology nurse etc. or it is just the same for all the nurses. I have heard that the staff nurses get paid less than speciality nurses. just want to conform. If somebody can give me info on this I will appreciate that. Thanks,
  5. by   kay s
    Quote from Mike A. Fungin RN
    The hospital I'm starting at in August pays everyone, regardless of educational background, $44.85/hour for their first six months as an entry-level new grad.

    After that six months, ADNs earn $47.12/hour and BSNs or MSNs get $48.32/hour. On a 36-hour a week schedule it's about a $2,200 dollar difference in gross annual income. My understanding though is that most hospitals in the area don't offer pay incentives for BSNs, and it's only a feather in your cap during the hiring process.

    Hi, just curious, what state you live in because this pay scale seems to be really high for any state. I will be happy to work in that area.
  6. by   kay s
    Quote from Tweety
    4% more for the BSN entry level new grad nurse, or about 75 to 90 cents an hour more. This small amount of money turns people off. But one has to remember that's entry level...both are RNs passing the same NCLEX, so it's natural that at an entry level the salary should be similar.

    The BSN is an investment in future opportunities down the line when one isn't an entry level nurse anymore and wants to move on.
    Good point,
  7. by   linearthinker
    We don't pay more for the BSN, but we don't hire diploma grads or ADNs at all. We do pay more for MSN, and specialty certification, but it is only a few dollars.
  8. by   Getting To Great
    Quote from SWS RN
    In South Florida, the pay for ADN and BSN is the same. The rate goes up with years of experience. I had a Bachelors Degree and Masters Degree in Health Administration before I went to nursing school. I went for the ADN-it was faster and had more clinical. I have been able to work as Supervisor and Director of Nursing using both. I was also accepted into an ARNP program as it is a ASN to MSN program. So I don't think the BSN is necessary.
    s
    Hello,

    What school in South Florida did you obtain you ADN?

    Thanks
  9. by   BCRNA
    i agree, i just did a quick check on pub-med and cinahl. the studies say care is improved by more "rns". not bsn's over adn's. there were several studies that came to this conclusion. i will live the reference to one of the articles. go to www.pubmed.com to check for yourself. i wish people who made such statements actually checked for themselves. many just say thats what studies say, but they have never read the study themselves.

    it is all about having quality rn's at the bedside. most of the articles suggested finding the right mix of nurse tech, lpn, and rn. those that had more rn's had better patient outcomes. most of these seemed to refer to icu settings, not ltc. don't want to downplay the role of good lpns and techs, they are extremely important too.

    j nurs educ. 2008 apr;47(4):149-56.
  10. by   BCRNA
    I have found just as many studies saying that it is RN, not ADN vs BSN that determines patient safety. I would really like to ready each study to see how it was set up. Carefully picking what studies you base your political decision on is typical. I bet the AACN wanted BSN over ADN to begin with.
  11. by   pirello77
    Quote from PianoPlayerRN
    At my hospital ADNs and BSNs get paid the same. However, as they are working toward Magnet status, they are actively rejecting ADNs for BSNs. I think hospitals in general are hiring more BSNs in this economy regardless of their goals for magnet status. Employment is way more competitive than several years ago. In addition, we read several studies during nursing school which concluded that BSNs offer better quality of care overall to their patients. In fact, there was a statistically significant decrease in the mortality rates of hospitals who staffed more BSNs.

    I worked hard for my degree and am proud of it!

    I work at a magnet hospital and have an ASN degree. (I am currently working towards my BSN because I want to do education) They hire both ASN & BSN. You DO NOT have to have a BSN degree to work in a magnet hospital.
    Also, that is ridiculous to think that the difference in the degree equates to lower standards of care and higher mortality for patients.

    I know that you worked hard for your degree. That is an accomplishment and you should be proud of it.

    However, I worked hard for my degree as well...ASN programs are not a walk in the park. I am proud to be an RN..and it doesn't matter if the degree is an ASN or a BSN.
  12. by   RNlovesherPharmD
    Quote from pirello77
    I work at a magnet hospital and have an ASN degree. (I am currently working towards my BSN because I want to do education) They hire both ASN & BSN. You DO NOT have to have a BSN degree to work in a magnet hospital.
    Also, that is ridiculous to think that the difference in the degree equates to lower standards of care and higher mortality for patients.

    I know that you worked hard for your degree. That is an accomplishment and you should be proud of it.

    However, I worked hard for my degree as well...ASN programs are not a walk in the park. I am proud to be an RN..and it doesn't matter if the degree is an ASN or a BSN.

    While searching for my job, the local hospital here that DOES have Magnet status stated that they "prefer" to hire BSNs, which in this economy, they can have their pick. They told me they get approximately 4,000 applications a month. They also start ADN and BSN prepared nurses at the SAME rate of pay. However, BSNs are sure to get raises, promotions, etc faster than ADNs.

    I chose to work at a government hospital where there IS a $6,000 difference between ADN and BSN prepared nurses. Going in, ADNs know they will be making less, and can only advance their salary so far without going back to school. That is it. Plain and dry.

    I am happy with my choice because at the hospital mentioned above there is TONS on tension/arguements between those nurses who feel that it is 1. unfair for the BSNs to advance more quickly and 2. for the hospital to assist the ADNs with tuition while they go back to school while not offering loan repayment options for those with their BSN already.

    I am a BSN, and proud to be. I feel we have a stronger background for WHY we do certain things as nurses, and not just what to do in certain situations. Nothing can take the place of experience though! However, what degree matters little when we are all here for the same reason--TO CARE FOR PATIENTS
  13. by   CHaley88
    Indiana State University

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