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mph53953

mph53953 BSN, RN

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mph53953's Latest Activity

  1. Hello! So I’ve been a nurse for close to two years now. I was on a med/surg floor for a little over a year, and I’ve been in an ICU since April 2019. I’m 24 years old, but I look several years younger than I really am. I feel like this makes it more difficult for patients/visitors/doctors/etc. to take me seriously. Usually people just ask me how old I am, how long I’ve been a nurse, what sort of training have I had, etc. and I answer their questions professionally and honestly, and then direct the conversation back to the plan of care. But every now and again, I get somebody who really tries to push me around or acts condescendingly towards me. Like once a patient had just come back from the OR about an hour before my shift started (so nothing was done). I had a drip with no order, wrong fluids hanging, about a million overdue meds and new orders to sift through, etc. The surgeon had just rounded and told her daughter the foley could come out. So the minute I enter the room the patient’s daughter demands I pull it. I explained to her that I would pull the foley, I just had some higher priority tasks I needed to complete first. She coldly said “Well do it then.” And then a few days ago, I had a visitor come up to the nurses station because the patient was missing items from his meal tray and she wanted to file a complaint. I told her I would check with my charge nurse to find out who the best person would be to escalate her concerns to. As soon as I walk away, she asks my coworkers if I was a REAL nurse because I sure seemed unsure of a lot of things (note that the only interactions I had with her up to this point were regarding missing meal tray items). And the rest of the day, she kept making all sorts of little comments. Like I’d understand if I had made a medication/procedural error or something, but all because I didn’t know off the top of my head who to contact about a meal tray complaint? (It’s a neuro ICU so most patients aren’t intact enough to realize if their meal trays are incorrect...let alone swallow.) So those situations are probably two of the worst cases I’ve dealt with. Usually when people comment about how young I look, I laugh with them and say “Hey, if it’s still working for me 20 years from now I’m not complaining!” Usually I just try to conduct myself with professionalism and confidence, and I answer honestly if I’m questioned about my age/experience. It’s just situations like this when people are unprovoked, and they attempt to assert themselves over me that I really don’t know what to do. Right now, I just take a “kill ‘em with kindness” approach. I’m afraid to put my foot down and say “I am not going to tolerate you talking to me like that” because I’m afraid it will escalate into an argument that I won’t win (not that arguing with a patient/visitor is acceptable in the first place). But at the same time, I’m so sick of feeling like a doormat in these situations. I have a more kind/soft-spoken demeanor, so standing up for myself doesn’t come naturally. Do all young nurses deal with this or is it just me?!?
  2. mph53953

    Travel Nursing

    Hello! So lately I’ve been curious about travel nursing. I worked on a medical progressive care unit for a little over one year and I’ve been in a neuro ICU since April 2019. I definitely want to wait a few years before going into traveling to gain some experience, especially because I’d like to stay in the ICU. Here’s a few of my questions: 1. I currently live in an apartment. Do travel nurses keep some sort of permanent residence somewhere? Or would I be better off ending my lease? If so, is it hard to adjust to not having a “home”? 2. Would my time in the neuro ICU be adequate to prepare me for for being an ICU travel nurse? Since I started, my unit has only really been 50% neuro patients; everyone else is medical and occasionally surgical overflow. We don’t get cardio-thoracic patients, so I don’t have experience managing swans or anything like that. 3. My boyfriend is in a respiratory therapy program, and I’d like to travel with him after he graduates. Do Travel Agencies work with RTs too? Would they help us find assignments together? Or would my boyfriend and I have to coordinate that on our own? 4. What are the schedules like? Can you negotiate straight dayshift/nightshift, holidays off, etc? 5. Do you really make more money? Between downsizing, moving/travel costs etc? I’m mostly interested in traveling for the adventure, but I’d also like to speed up the process of paying back my student loans! 6. Would travel nursing help me learn/grow as an ICU nurse more than a traditional job? I feel like I’d get more exposure to different things in travel nursing, but in a traditional job I’d be able to find mentors in doctors, midlevels, more experienced nurses, etc. Thanks!!!
  3. mph53953

    Travel Nursing

    Hello! So lately I’ve been curious about travel nursing. I worked on a medical progressive care unit for a little over one year and I’ve been in a neuro ICU since April 2019. I definitely want to wait a few years before going into traveling to gain some experience, especially because I’d like to stay in the ICU. Here’s a few of my questions: 1. I currently live in an apartment. Do travel nurses keep some sort of permanent residence somewhere? Or would I be better off ending my lease? If so, is it hard to adjust to not having a “home”? 2. Would my time in the neuro ICU be adequate to prepare me for for being an ICU travel nurse? Since I started, my unit has only really been 50% neuro patients; everyone else is medical and occasionally surgical overflow. We don’t get cardio-thoracic patients, so I don’t have experience managing swans or anything like that. 3. My boyfriend is in a respiratory therapy program, and I’d like to travel with him after he graduates. Do Travel Agencies work with RTs too? Would they help us find assignments together? Or would my boyfriend and I have to coordinate that on our own? 4. What are the schedules like? Can you negotiate straight dayshift/nightshift, holidays off, etc? 5. Do you really make more money? Between downsizing, moving/travel costs etc? I’m mostly interested in traveling for the adventure, but I’d also like to speed up the process of paying back my student loans! 6. Would travel nursing help me learn/grow as an ICU nurse more than a traditional job? I feel like I’d get more exposure to different things in travel nursing, but in a traditional job I’d be able to find mentors in doctors, midlevels, more experienced nurses, etc. Thanks!!!
  4. mph53953

    Forgot to unclamp the secondary

    Honey, if unclamping a secondary is the worst mistake you’ve made, you’re doing great! It’s easy to feel like you’re making silly mistakes and forgetting things because when you’re on orientation (especially if you’re a new grad or in a new specialty) your brain is literally being bombarded with an overwhelming amount of information. Hang in there and stay positive- it gets better
  5. mph53953

    Preparing to Apply to ICU

    I am a newer nurse. I'm roughly 7 months into my first job. In January/February when I hit the big 1 year mark, I want to start applying to ICUs. I applied to ICUs straight out of school, but the only ICU job offer I got was in an area I didn't want to relocate to. Instead, I accepted a job on a progressive care unit with telemetry. I guess one of the reasons I didn't really get any ICU job offers was because when I graduated I wasn't prepared enough for the ICU. I graduated from Bloomsburg University, which does not have a critical care clinical rotation. Instead, they have us shadow in the ICU for two days. (We still have Adult Health 2, which is basically a critical care course, but the corresponding clinical rotation focuses on assuming a full patient assignment on a med/surg floor). I also did not do an internship or externship in an ICU. So during my interviews when they were asking me about my experiences during school, I was really at a loss. So far on my floor, I have had experience with telemetry, chest tubes, stroke patients, withdraw patients, trachs, dressing changes, drips (heparin, insulin, amiodarone), and everything else encompassed in the med/surg nine yards. I have had 6-7 patients on dayshift and 7-8 patients on nightshift. We have no step-down ICU at my hospital so I'm often caring for high-acuity patients. (Nurse-patient ratios are getting a little better now that staffing is improving.) I'm comfortable communicating with residents, attendings, case managers, and other members of the healthcare team. I'm signed up for an ACLS class in October and a PALS class in November. I guess what I'm trying to say is what are my chances of getting into an ICU when I have a year of experience? Will they mostly just ask me about my year of med/surg, or will they dig up my lack of experience during nursing school again? Also, is there anything else I can do to try to fluff up my resume other than ACLS and PALS? Finally any advice on interview questions? "So tell me about yourself!" and "Why do you want to work here?" are by far my LEAST favorite questions to try to answer because I'm never sure what the "right" answer is.
  6. mph53953

    Experience/GRE?

    Hello! I've been a nurse in a medical progressive care unit for approximately 6mo. When I reach 1 year, I want to transfer to an ICU. Right now, I am considering the MICU, SICU, and CVICU. Which of these units would best prepare me for a CRNA program? Additionally, I want to begin reviewing for the GRE. What is the best way to go about studying? I was hoping to do a self-paced online review course like I did when I took my NCLEX because that worked really well for me. I did a quick google search and the prices were shocking. Nearly $1000 for a review course- REALLY?!?! I'm just not willing to spend more money reviewing for the GRE than I did the NCLEX. I did stumble upon a website called Magoosh that offers 6mo access for $149, which I can actually afford with a new nurse paycheck. But the difference in price has me concerned about the quality. Has anyone tried Magoosh before? Or does anyone have any other affordable review methods that worked well? Thanks!!!!!
  7. mph53953

    Applying to CRNA Programs?

    Thanks for the advice everyone! As far as to why I withdrew...I went into a BSN program straight out of high school. I had no prior experience working in a nursing home, working as a NA/PCT, and I did not seek out an internship/externship. Going to clinical two days a week for a few weeks every semester just wasn't giving me enough practice to feel comfortable in my clinical environment. I was able to get by until my very last clinical rotation, but then my lack of experience finally showed. There was no major "incident" or anything, I just wasn't comfortable in the clinical environment and I wasn't ready to graduate. At my midterm clinical evaluation, my instructor advised me to withdraw. After I withdrew, I got a job as a NA in a step-down ICU and worked full-time that summer. (I was the person everyone would ask to cover their shifts- I was starving for experience so everyone knew I'd never turn down hours!) At the end of the summer before the semester started, I met with the skills lab director and spent two days going practicing every skill and asking every question I could possibly think of. Then before clinical started, I met with my new clinical instructor to discuss my concerns about the upcoming clinical rotation, and to get 1-on-1 instruction so I could better understand what was expected from the paperwork. I passed the clinical rotation with no issues. Repeating this class was one of the most terrifying and heartbreaking things I've ever dealt with, but I did everything I could to turn it into an experience I could learn from. Unfortunately the blemish will always be on my transcript :/
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