Jump to content
elephantlover

elephantlover BSN, RN

Member Member
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 55

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 1,229

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

elephantlover's Latest Activity

  1. elephantlover

    Save your back, do powerlifting

    I think OP has a good point and did not intend to undermine the need for safe patient handling practices and equipment in the workplace. Of course, not all nurses need to be nor can be powerlifters. There IS a body of research to supports even limited resistance training as an effective measure to reduce injury risk. People develop musculoskeletal disorders just from sitting at a desk all day long. Researchers suggest that nurses are at the greatest risk among all health care workers to develop work-related injuries (Davis & Kotowski, 2015). Although I suspect EMS/ medics are up there with nursing. Although my personal experience is anecdotal, strength training has helped with lower back pain. I started working in LTC when I was 17 and knew I was too young to be waking up with back pain. Numerous coworkers on leave for back injuries, hip replacements. NOT OKAY. After a couple of years, I left this LTC facility for an acute care setting. I was tired of shortcuts and being asked to roll patients three times my weight without assistance because "other people had no problem rolling them with an assist of one." I digress. This post is a great opportunity to discuss workplace safety. It is disappointing that it takes workplace injuries for change to occur. I am happy to report that I see more mechanical lifts being used and specialty beds that reposition patients. The training and equipment matters, but I think having a culture of safety is what matters most. Does management look for solutions to reduce injury risk? Is staffing appropriate? Are people willing to take the "extra time" it requires to move patient's safety and utilize equipment that is available? Are nurses encouraged to put their foot down when something seems unsafe?
  2. elephantlover

    Residency or not?

    I graduated in May as well. I started right away at a large urban teaching hospital with magnet status that enrolled new grads into a mandatory "residency program." The program had watered-down content in my opinion. It involved monthly meetings where we watched videos on topics like self-care, delegation, finance, end of life care etc. Basically repeats of lectures I had in nursing school. The whole thing sounded lovely in theory, but the quality of education was poor in my opinion. Yes, please tell me more about self-care as I pinch myself to stay awake because it has been 20 hours since I last slept . Other than these monthly meetings (where I was half asleep after a 12 hour night shift), there was nothing more to the program. I got to a point where I felt my learning was tapering off. I was working with almost exclusively other new RNs and first-year residents. Not many seasoned folks to turn to. I decided to leave this teaching hospital, the biggest reason being I needed to be closer to my family. One month ago I started a new job at a smaller regional medical center with no formal new grad residency program. I have learned SO much more in my first month here than I did in 6 months at the teaching hospital. My orientation at my new job is TWO weeks longer than my orientation was at my former job as a brand spanking new grad. There is truly a culture of excellence where I work. I feel supported and look forward to going to work most days. For the most part, people are receptive to newcomers. I have learned a lot from doctors, respiratory therapists, care managers, and other nurses all willing to take the time to teach me new things. These informal learning opportunities have been far more valuable to me than the silly videos we watched in nurse residency meetings at my last job. I allowed titles and name recognition to sway my decision with my first job as a new grad. I made the mistake of assuming name recognition went hand in hand with quality nursing and professional development. Look at the big picture. I am a better nurse now because I am happier being closer to family working for a community hospital where I have the opportunity to build relationships with my colleagues. I did some serious investigative work before taking this position. I considered several area hospitals and talked with people I knew to get an idea of what the culture was like at each place. Long story short, bigger is not always better. It really depends on what YOU are looking for and where you are going to have balance and QOL. I think the previous posters hit the nail on the head, nurse residency is a loose term. What exactly does the program entail and how would that be any different from the orientation you would receive as a new grad elsewhere? Good luck to you!
  3. elephantlover

    Feeling incompetent as a student nurse...

    I am a nursing student and I feel the same way as you. I excel in my theory classes and I do well enough in clinical. But I have moments where I forget things or stumble on my words when giving report. Moments like these make me question I am cut out for this profession. I would like to think this is normal to a certain extent. Maybe some of it has to do with how we process information and communicate compared to others? Keeping a detailed to-do list and "brain" sheet has helped a lot. Working as a CNA and nurse extern has helped A LOT. I think time, experience, and diligence will get us to where we want to go. Good luck from one student to the next. You aren't alone.
  4. elephantlover

    Late to clinical

    It is a good lesson. I am sure you will not make it again. Nursing schools have to prepare you for a real job where there would be disciplinary action. If you mind your ps and qs you should be fine. I use two alarms on my phone and an alarm on my watch. I double check the time and volume on both each night. Budget 20-30 minutes extra than you think you need and you should be fine. And ps. Have some confidence. shake it off. prove that you can grow and learn from this. We all make mistakes. It is what we do to learn from them that matters.
  5. I am in my last semester of an accelerated BSN program. I think the hardest thing about nursing school has been balancing my priorities: work, clinical, school, staying healthy, etc. I had MANY times where I would go from clinical to work, work till midnight and leave my house the next morning for clinical at 5:15 AM. I think being in clinical adds a new layer to nursing school. Clinical is very time intensive. From the prep work to post clinical paperwork. At my school expectations were very high. I would spend 10 hours a week on clinical paperwork.
  6. elephantlover

    Mission Health Nurse Residency Program

    Hi there. I am curious if you ended up at Mission Health? I just submitted my nurse residency application for the summer of 2019. Would love to hear about your first year.
  7. elephantlover

    Med school drop out, now a CRNA. ask me anything...

    My understanding is that CAA school is the anesthesia equivalent of PA school. So with the proper prereqs you could get in with any bachelor's degree. Mier Kat is probably correct in that CNRAs are more widely used. Not sure what the outlook is for CAA
  8. elephantlover

    Phlebitis management. Was this handled correctly?

    I appreciate your input everyone! I love learning from experienced nurses. In my opinion, the rise of ligation in healthcare has contributed to this protocolization of tasks as you describe JKL33. The way in which reimbursement works has also. Nursing care is not so black and white though. I digress. Thank you for your time!
  9. elephantlover

    Phlebitis management. Was this handled correctly?

    I appreciate your input. You sound like a good preceptor. I am trying to learn as much as I can about clinical decision making before I am on my own this summer. I agree there aren't excuses for incompetent care. This particular nurse was precepted by an RN who is rather flippant and short with new nurses who ask questions. Management has been made aware and this woman has improved her behavior. I have enough confidence to not care how others perceive my question. I wish all nurses would provide the support that you describe.
  10. elephantlover

    Phlebitis management. Was this handled correctly?

    Thanks for your feedback. I do not want to rip on this nurse. She is a new nurse figuring things out. I just wonder why the policy at my hospital is so vague about phlebitis. Perhaps a certain degree is acceptable, and simply needs to be monitored depending on the circumstances (e.g. the patient is discharging shortly etc.)?
  11. elephantlover

    Med school drop out, now a CRNA. ask me anything...

    You can get your masters in anesthesia and become a certified anesthesia assistant. Different from CRNA school. CNRA programs build off of the student's critical care experience as RNs. Not absurd. Makes them qualified, experienced, skilled.
  12. elephantlover

    Placed on oncology for first term in hospital! Advice please!

    Hi there! I think your first clinical in the acute care setting is a big step regardless of the unit you are on. Some nerves are to be expected. General advice to calm your nerves before clinical: do thorough prep work. Wake up early the morning of and give yourself plenty of time in the morning to get ready and make it safely to clinical. The time it takes to find a parking spot, walk into the hospital, and get settled on the unit might be over ten minutes. Go in early to check your patient's orders and get settled. Observe how employees interact with the patients. You will likely shadow for a day before jumping in. You likely won't be administering chemo. You need a special certification to do this as an RN. Just listen to patients. Introduce yourself to form a bond. Let the patient know it was nice to meet them. Thank them for allowing you to work with them. Follow their lead. Don't minimize their experience or tell them not to worry. Try to validate the emotion the patient is experiencing. I float to the oncology medical unit at the hospital where I work as a tech. The patients are not as intimidating as I thought they were going to be. Cancer-related pain can be difficult to manage. Be prepared to use pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Ask the patient what works for them. Don't be afraid to ask difficult questions during your assessment like how have your moods been? You will likely see all sorts of patients on this unit. Hopefully an oncology nurse chimes in. I would be interested to hear from a real professional. Good luck to you! I am excited for you. It is OK to feel nervous. I often felt incompetent during my first acute care clinical. I am not suggesting you too will feel this way, but know my confidence and skills have come along way. No one expects you to know everything or to have the perfect communication skills. Be respectful, keep safety in mind, and work hard.
  13. elephantlover

    Phlebitis management. Was this handled correctly?

    Interesting. I hear what you're saying! I have more limited experience with venipuncture. I will keep this in mind. The RNs on my unit do not draw labs and they rarely start IVs. I just don't think to claim someone is a difficult poke is a valid excuse to leave an IV catheter in a patient a red, rock hard vein just because it flushes.
  14. elephantlover

    Phlebitis management. Was this handled correctly?

    The patient was of normal weight. Middle-aged. Visible veins. We have IV resource nurses at the hospital I work at. I just was trying to understand why this particular nurse decided not to start a new IV. But yes, thank you for your answer. If a patient complains of new pain at the IV site. Remove and start a new an IV.
  15. elephantlover

    Phlebitis management. Was this handled correctly?

    THANK YOU! This seems so straightforward in my mind. This patient's vein was being irritated by the catheter and the abx. Solution. STOP and remove. Further complications could develop. I just could not understand why my hospital's policy was so vague. We have resource nurses that will use ultrasound to start IVs as well. Takes the burden off the nurse. This seems black and white. Now I know what not to do. Thank you for walking me through the big picture.
  16. elephantlover

    Favorite Lunches

    I love Ezekiel bread! Always have a loaf in the freezer. I am going to have to try your tuna salad sandwich with jalapenos and pickles. Sounds tasty. I agree rotisserie chicken is a big time saver. Always worth it. I too love egg bakes. Yum, your egg muffins sound great. I like to add sweet potatoes, spinach, jalapeños, and broccoli in mine. Basically whatever I can find in the fridge. For breakfast, I like to do steel cut oats with walnuts, PB, and blueberries. The oats take about 15 minutes to cook, I always hop in the shower and get dressed while my oats simmer. Yes, I make my own protein shakes and I buy iconic grass fed protein shakes (I love the golden milk one). In my shakes, I like frozen berries, vega protein powder, instant espresso, almond milk, and cocoa powder. Sometimes I will use peaches, greens, and use tea as my liquid. Banzo pasta is my favorite! Only ingredient is chickpeas. I use that for cold pastas. I like to add broccoli, cherry tomatoes, onions, pesto add ranch seasoning. Soba noodles are another favorite. They cook in 2-3 minutes, but are still an excellent whole grain. I eat them cold and warm. I like to add liquid aminos (or soy sauce), edamame (I buy frozen and steam), sometimes I will scramble an egg, sometimes PB for the flavor. Other stir-fry veggies sautéed. Avocado salsa salad. I add salmon or chicken. Snacks: • Cheese • Popcorn • Salsa and corn chips • Apples and PB • Yogurt • I like the healthy grains kind bars. These do have roughly 5 grams of added sugar, but it’s one of the better tasting granola bars I have found that are packed with nutrient dense ingredients. • Dark chocolate • Iconic grass-fed protein drinks • Golden-milk smoothies (turmeric, protein powder, almond or coconut milk, ginger, pepper) • I love some treats too: fig newtons, alternative chocolate chip cookies (google Chelsea’s messy apron), dark chocolate. I think we are on the same food wavelength Sounds like you eat some well-rounded meals
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.