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NBolas

NBolas

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NBolas's Latest Activity

  1. Hi, I graduated 6 month ago and landed a job on a busy surgical unit 2 month ago. I've had 6 independent shifts and I struggled through them. I'm making errors (some due to not knowing how things work since I switched provinces... others due to carelessness) and my manager wants to put me on a learning plan. I'm terrified of eventually making an error that will harm a patient. I just don't think acute care is for me. I have a few questions. 1. If I quit 2 months in, how bad does that look for my next employer? Is it better to suffer through my current job, potentially making errors, to avoid a redflag on the resume? 2. What are some alternatives to acute care nursing for a new grad? I love nursing, but I'm not good at rushing to get tasks done. Is there something that fits this? Thank you!
  2. NBolas

    U of Calgary Accelerated 2018 January

    Got accepted last week via the degree holder route! I believe my GPA is around 3.9 according to they way they calculate it.
  3. NBolas

    U of Calgary Accelerated 2018 January

    Nice to meet you! Degree holder route. Good luck on your applications!
  4. Hi no-scrubs, For me, my study style is to read the textbook according to the study guide and verbally review the chapter. I find that talking out loud to myself helps the most. That being said, you may have a completely different way of learning, so use whatever works for you. For points that are unclear or confusing, I recommend using the rich resources available on Youtube... there are a lot of anatomy tutorials and lectures there
  5. NBolas

    Advice needed! LPN or RN?

    I'm 30 and I am just starting my RN program (in a week actually). Don't worry about your age!
  6. I'm planning to transit as well, but I would have a car just in case since they did mention that some sites can be tough to get to. Car 2 Go doesn't seem as reliable here as it is in BC. Also, awesome to know that there will be another BC person in the program!
  7. If there's anything I learned from my previous degree, it's to hold off on buying textbooks until the courses actually start. I've probably lost $1k in total buying books that were never used.
  8. NBolas

    BIO 235

    I replied to you on another post, but I'll post it here again I completed the BIO 235 program this summer. It is a very content-heavy course and my suggestion would be to adhere strictly to the Study Guide, as the midterms and finals do not go beyond the required material. This is especially important for the second half of the course where the memorization ramps up. For the midterms and finals, know the diagrams in the textbook very well. Often times you'll see the exact same diagram on the exam. Some of the questions on the quiz ask for specific details (details I often glance over when studying), so be familiar with where things are in the textbook. They designed the quizzes to be "open book" so some questions require a bit of digging around. I agree that the communication is lacking in this course. They basically said "read this book, take these tests. That'll be $1500." However, do try hard for the assignments, as the person who marked mine expected extensive detail. For the first assignment I wrote a paragraph for each short answer question, which landed me a grade in the mid-80s. For the second assignment I decided to go all out and include as much detail as I could... a couple of my answers were in fact 500+ word essays. That landed me a score in the mid-90s. Feel free to ask if you have further questions. Best of luck!
  9. I completed the BIO 235 program this summer. It is a very content-heavy course and my suggestion would be to adhere strictly to the Study Guide, as the midterms and finals do not go beyond the required material. This is especially important for the second half of the course where the memorization ramps up. For the midterms and finals, know the diagrams in the textbook very well. Often times you'll see the exact same diagram on the exam. Some of the questions on the quiz ask for specific details (details I often glance over when studying), so be familiar with where things are in the textbook. They designed the quizzes to be "open book" so some questions require a bit of digging around. I agree that the communication is lacking in this course. They basically said "read this book, take these tests. That'll be $1500." However, do try hard for the assignments, as the person who marked mine expected extensive detail. For the first assignment I wrote a paragraph for each short answer question, which landed me a grade in the mid-80s. For the second assignment I decided to go all out and include as much detail as I could... a couple of my answers were in fact 500+ word essays. That landed me a score in the mid-90s. Feel free to ask if you have further questions. Best of luck!
  10. School is starting soon! Really looking forward to meeting everyone in a few weeks. Have a wonderful holiday!
  11. I contacted admissions and they gave me a timeline of 4-6 weeks until I hear back. Wouldn't all the spots be filled up by then??
  12. Thank you all very much for your replies and for sharing your experiences/wisdom with me! For some reason I only received alerts for the first couple of responses. A number of you asked why I'm not going for the MD route, and there are a few reasons. For one, the time and financial commitment of medical school + residency (~8 years in total) is a tremendous burden for my family. I'll be 40 years old before making some real income. Yes, there are lines of credit, but I'm already in enough dept with mortgage and such. As well, after speaking with doctors and nurses, I find that the lifestyle of nurses is potentially more suitable for me. My friends who are doctors mention that they never truly stop working, even when they are away from the clinic. There are always patient files to review, cases to ponder, and emergencies that require attention. This is something I can relate to, coming from research. The time away from the lab is used to catch up on reading journal articles to stay up to date. I've also been told that nurses have the opportunity to spend more time with patients. As companisbiki mentioned, nursing is very personal, and that is one of the aspects of healthcare that I admire. Doctors and nurses care for patients in different ways, and I am perhaps more suited to providing care the way that nurses do. It's also worthwhile to note that one does not need a MD to conduct clinical research, as many PhDs I worked with do that already. Personally, however, I feel that understanding how to care for patients will help tremendously when researching ways to improve patient care. @Fiona59, thank you for the insight. It's encouraging to hear that you have met nurses who are involved in research. The type of research you mentioned is the type I am most interested in. My previous lab also looked at the nutrition of hospital food... some very interesting finding there.
  13. They took forever to receive my transcript... didn't get my green circle until Sept 28th. Any idea how long it takes from here to get acceptance? I applied for the degree holder route and should have a 3.85 GPA according to their calculations.
  14. Hi everyone, thank you for reading my post. First, a bit of background about me. I am currently 30 years old, male, with a strong interest in healthcare. I have a PhD in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, specializing in atherosclerosis. I have also completed 2 years of post-doctoral training in diabetes, obesity, and developmental origins of health and disease. Ever since my third year of undergrad (9 years ago now, wow), I have been in and around hospitals on a daily basis, as all of my studies were done there. While I do cherish the intellectual challenges and the exciting discoveries that a career in academic research offers, I find myself longing for the clinic. I want real contact with patients, to be able to make a difference on a daily basis, and all the while feel challenged in my work. I entered research with the intention of improving health care, but there is a significant gap between these two worlds. If I do not understand what patient care entails, how can I improve it through research? This year I have applied to the nursing program at the U of Calgary. If accepted, I would work hard to become a RN, with the possibilities of working towards a NP in the future. Before going forward, I have a few questions about nursing. 1. For nurses, do you enjoy your work? Do you find that your skills are being fully utilized? Do you have the time and opportunity to collaborate with scientists on research projects? 2. What is the job market projection in Canada for RNs or NPs in the next 2-4 years? 3. Is it relatively easy to move from province to province for work? For example, would BC preferentially select applicants who obtained their degree in BC? Or would I be able to get a job there? Thank you very much for your time!
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