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NurseOrBust13

NurseOrBust13

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NurseOrBust13's Latest Activity

  1. Wow thanks for all your insight and thoughts. I’m definitely learning that this is something only some of the nurses do but still more than I expected, which makes me a little uneasy about. I haven’t been showing up early-early during these past four shifts and I do feel that I could accomplish the same work pace of those who do. Also no shift will be the same. Overall, I’m realizing the personality that my preceptor has is definitely what causes her to get there so early. It’s pretty interesting to watch actually - very questioning and sometimes seemingly ready to pounce. It’s also nice to see how different people do things and how one nurse is laid back and calm whereas others are running around. Still not sure if that’s a good thing. 🥴 I do understand the possibility of HIPAA violations, insurance liability issues, etc. and it just doesn’t seem worth it. I am definitely taking everyone’s advice in finding my own flow. Thanks again everyone!
  2. Hi all, I’m a baby nurse (new grad) going into day 3 of orientation with my preceptor. She mentioned that she lives close (within 5 mins) to the hospital so she usually gets there early [at a time that places her 40 minutes earlier than the start of her shift] so that she can get her day started ahead of clocking in. When our shift was coming to an end, I hadn’t looked at the time so I thought it was time to go because I saw night shift staff all over... but no, we had at least 45 minutes to even give handoff. One person (still in her coat, who I realized was a nurse) was even there more than an hour before shift start. So I realized this was a majority thing. But why? Is this a common trend? When my professors in nursing school mentioned this, most scoffed at the idea of working for free. Yes I’m a new nurse but I’m not fresh out of school entering the workforce for the first time. It just feels weird that the notion is - in order to be successful and get home on time we have to work off the clock. I do understand being there in time to get settled (lunch purse away lol, snack eaten, coffee refill, non-patient chit chat, etc.) and getting your ducks in a row, mentally, to begin your shift. I’m not really an early riser but I do get in early enough to be on the unit at an appropriate time. I just feel like I can’t compete with the nurse who’s there an hour early. It’s like I’ll look ill-prepared being on the unit only 15 minutes prior to starting. I just figure - I’m here for 12 hours and of course I’m still learning time management as an RN but gooooodness! Isn’t half of a day enough?? And if not, why? Do you do this? Is it so that you are able to be ahead or question the nurse who’s giving you report? Is it a reflection of management that it’s allowed or even required in order to feel comfortable with your patients? I hope this doesn’t come off as offensive or snooty but I am really curious and kinda nervous at the same time.
  3. NurseOrBust13

    Goal: CRNA; Post ADN advice

    Thanks so much! My science courses are only average - B’s and a C if I remember correctly. They’ll be “expired”, though, by the time I’m ready to apply. So I’ll have to retake based on most schools I’ve seen.
  4. NurseOrBust13

    University of Cincinnati Rn-BSN

    Hello, Did either of you enroll in the UC BSN? I’d like to hear your feedback. If not UC, I’ll take your feedback on the program you chose. Thank you!
  5. NurseOrBust13

    Goal: CRNA; Post ADN advice

    Thank you for replying! My BS is in Human Development and I was pre-need. I was told that back then I should do something I liked instead of Bio/Chem, even though I was pretty much taking all of the required classes. So I now acknowledge that I have a “fluff” BS. I’m in Illinois and plan to apply to every CRNA school here plus wherever else I find over the next couple of years. I’ve been in contact with counselors at DePaul, which I’m really banking on - that plan would be to finish their MS program (come out with a BS, MS/FNP) and then apply to their NA program. I'm also looking at UIC since I went to UIUC. They have an RN-BSN program as well as their generalist MSN. Then there are the online BSN programs like NIU, Purdue, U St. Francis, SXU, Benedictine, Governor’s State. Am I wrong in thinking CRNA schools may prefer one school’s degree over the next? I’ve looked into schools like Capella, U of Phoenix, etc. and while the prices are great, I don’t feel confident that their degrees can get me where I need to be.
  6. NurseOrBust13

    Goal: CRNA; Post ADN advice

    Thank you for replying. I do have a BS. With the program I mentioned in the initial post, I’d confer the BS in nursing while completing the MS/FNP portion. To be competitive, you don’t think I need anything past my BS?
  7. NurseOrBust13

    I got accepted into CRNA School

    Wow! Thanks so much for sharing! Congratulations on your acceptance!
  8. NurseOrBust13

    Goal: CRNA; Post ADN advice

    Hello and thanks in advance for reading and/or replying to my thoughts! I am entering my last semester in my ADN program this fall and I am looking for advice on which route to take to reach CRNA school. I hold a non-nursing BS. Prior to applying to the ADN program my plan was to complete one of a few available Masters-entry program and end up with a generalist MS in nursing. At that time I did not plan to become an NP at all, just take the direct path to CRNA be it BS or MS. I recently learned that one of the generalist programs I was interested in requires picking NP/Educator/Admin as the outcome for the RN-MS bridge. With this I'm concerned that I'll be viewed as not knowing what I want. CRNA applications would likely go out almost immediately following the completion of the MS program. My thought is that I enroll in an RN-MS program over RN-BSN, which will allow me to be able use financial aid as I've borrowed close to my undergraduate limit. I've been paying out of pocket for my ADN but I know this cost difference is significant. I feel the MS might grant me the most bang for my buck. When it comes to choosing the BSN route, I'm further conflicted because I feel that not all online RN-BSN programs are created equally and there are so many options but I don't know which is the best fit. Ideally, I'd like to finish fast and not have a huge tuition bill. Are there any programs to stay away from? Might CRNA admission counselors weigh one BSN program over another? My main issues are with time and cost, both being the two things that I know I have to invest in order to reach my goal. But still... I'm not naive in that I expect to get into CRNA school as soon as possible. Three years ICU experience minimum is my plan. I likely will have an ICU position directly following graduation. I'd just like to know what makes sense? I'm concerned that I'll pick an online BSN program that CRNA admissions doesn't think highly of or I'll be looked at as not knowing what I really want if I come out of an MS program with an FNP license and then turn around and apply for CRNA. Again, thanks for hearing me and my disorganization out! I'd like to have a bit of a game plan in place as I prepare to knock out this last semester!
  9. NurseOrBust13

    JJC spring 2018 nursing program

    I'm sure you'll be fine if you're not actually a user. If you're afraid enough to do so, you can buy a home drug test and take that first. You'll def be able to find somewhere to get your BLS! No worries! We'll all be there in January to get this thing going! Best of luck to you and everyone! See you guys in October!
  10. NurseOrBust13

    JJC spring 2018 nursing program

    Hey!! I have. It seems very particular and picky but hasn't really given me much trouble. I'm basically just submitting the same documents multiple times. It does get a little funky when I submit things via my iPhone but it is accessible either way. My background check was done in what seems like hours and the Complio people usually get back to me the next day if they have updated or rejected anything.
  11. NurseOrBust13

    JJC spring 2018 nursing program

    Check now. It was sent a little later than regular business hours lol.
  12. NurseOrBust13

    JJC spring 2018 nursing program

    So my OCD started kicking in and I've been looking at classes based on this upcoming fall semester's and last spring semester's class schedule. So far for the day program I've seen that classes mostly are 2 hours in total with 8am - 1pm start times. Each one also seems to meet twice a week. Of course clinicals will alter that schedule.
  13. NurseOrBust13

    JJC spring 2018 nursing program

    Hey!! Who's all with me in the day program for spring 2018??
  14. NurseOrBust13

    Lewis University ABSN Questions

    Hey! Sorry to get your hopes up as I am not a current student. Just applying too! I was stuck with these questions too so I'd love to hear from current students as well. I'll tell you what I know (well understand). But as far as your first point, I spoke with an admissions counselor yesterday and basically it seemed that as long you met the requirements (no rule violations; GPA; KAT scores of at least 82 in math and reading) and apply and everything, they will connect you with the program director who makes the final decision. From what I understand, this is the information session. She will answer questions and go over program details at this point, which seems a little backwards but I am positive that many of the questions can and will be answered by calling adult admissions. I had an entire list when I called. Then the program director will review your application, KAT scores, academic history and grant acceptance into the program if the circumstances are right. From there you speak with a program advisor to determine your start date and he or she will save you a spot in that particular cohort. [This was all taken from an info packet sent to me from the advisor I spoke with.] It seems like it's a pretty individualized process and that the "information session" kind of acts as an impromptu interview. As for the tuition, the last number I saw was $555 per credit hour. I did my own calculations for the total cost of the degree and it put me at $35,520 for the 64 credit hours required from the program. This is not including the extra university fees. I recently found out that the hospital I work for has a partnership with the university thus offering a discount. So I'd look into that as well. So about +/-$30k for 5 semesters of 18 months. You would have to factor in your preterm semester as well. Hope this helps!
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