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ger_bearr

ger_bearr BSN, RN

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ger_bearr has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN.

ger_bearr's Latest Activity

  1. ger_bearr

    How to Get NCLEX Results

    Yeah you didn't finish it. That's the old way to check. You actually do have to put in credit card info (well, a correct card number, but false Exp date and security code) and hit submit, which takes you to a review page, then submit again. Then and only then would you get a good or bad pop up. Lol Buuut, whatever you passed! Congratulations!
  2. ger_bearr

    How to Get NCLEX Results

    I'm curious, a lot of people who said they that Pearson View trick didn't work for them either didn't do it correctly or did it too soon. May I ask how you did the pearson view trick? the steps, I mean.
  3. ger_bearr

    Roseman University 18-month Program?

    I'll be there tomorrow. uhhh, interview itself is like 10-20 min... I don't really remember the questions though, I know they ask things about profesionalism, inspiration... it's not bad, just be honest
  4. ger_bearr

    Roseman University 18-month Program?

    Good luck!
  5. ger_bearr

    Roseman University 18-month Program?

    Congratulations!
  6. ger_bearr

    Roseman University 18-month Program?

    I'm not sure about the first lady, but the Filipino lady was probably Bermundo. :) She's a cohort favorite. While your TEAS score is one of the deciding factors, don't overlook that high GPA you've got there... That surely helps with your chances. Just be sure to maintain your grades as you finish up your pre-reqs. You've also had your interview... I wouldn't worry about how fast you answered your questions, so long as your answers were genuine. I think my interview lasted like 10 minutes, it was pretty fast. Keep me posted! Wishing you luck!
  7. ger_bearr

    Roseman BSN August 2016 Cohort

    Sorry for the laaate response. Getting familiar with pathophysiology would be helpful once you start getting into the diseases. Block 1 is just a history/knowledge class about nursing. Knowing disease process is sooo useful. I also recommend learning important lab values and if you're really eager, look up some commonly used medications and their indications and any stand-out side effects --- but you won't be doing pharmacology til block 4 (but those 2 weeks are intense; having some familiarity with some of the drugs will make it easier for you)
  8. ger_bearr

    Roseman University 18-month Program?

    With your GPA....as long as you passed your TEAS, you should be okay. Do you remembers who interviewed you? :)
  9. ger_bearr

    Roseman University ABSN - Change, Growth and Learn

    My cohort is doing well. A couple of people are block remediating next week -- once they pass that test, they go into their clinical. Meanwhile, those who did not have to block remediate, are finishing up clinical this week, then go on break for 3 weeks (while the remediating group does their clinical). I love my cohort, the people are awesome. I think we've got a good class vibe going on, really. We share notes, help each other out (some stay after class), post tips and tricks, etc. It's a team effort and everyone is pretty good at appreciating that. We all want each other to pass. Sim labs: we've only done one sim lab so far... there's more coming up. They chose a handful of pairs to go into the room, with the professor speaking as the dummy. You treat it like you would a real hospital situation - identify your patient, assess, ensure safety, etc. - just do what you've been taught in class and what you practice in clinical. It's not too bad.... little nerve wracking because you know your friends are watching you outside and you get to watch a playback... but otherwise, it's fun. hahaha. Clinical: We got our clinical locations 2 weeks before the rotation start date. 3 days out of the week, 12 hr shifts... some instructors might make you come in the day before your first day(of the week) to pick a patient to do your paperwork/care plan one. The length and what you get to do during clinical depends on what block you're in (3, 5, 8, 10, 11, etc.). I'm just about to complete Block 5's clinical, so I can only really speak for blocks 3 and 5 for now. - Block 3: Fundamentals; at this point you've learned how to provide basic care and how to do a full head to toe assessment on a patient. You can also practice sterile technique (e.g. inserting urinary catheters, wound dressing changes). Since you can't hand out meds (b/c you haven't taken pharm yet), your days tend to consist of answering call lights, getting vital signs, and scoping out for any interesting wounds/procedures for you and your groupmates to witness. This is when you start to try and get comfortable in hospital/patient situations, plus you gotta do paperwork on your patient(s). -Block 5.Adult Health 1; you've got your fundamentals down (assessment and basic care), but know you have also learned about more diseases and conditions, medications and how to administer them and chart them. At this point you can give oral medications and injections, no IV medications until block 10, BUT you can start IVs (that's as close as you're gonna get to flushing a line for now). Annnd you've got paperwork to do on your patient(s), hahaha.
  10. ger_bearr

    Roseman University ABSN - Change, Growth and Learn

    AvaRose, sorry you had that experience with a previous cohort. You probably were at the same hospital with an outlying group, since most, if not all of us are always so "hopeful" that we would get to participate in a Code. The students use saw who were doing "CNA" tasks were Block 3 students, who haven't taken the pharmacology course yet, nor have practiced MAR checking, med administration, etc. At the point, Block 3 student are there to get familiar with a hospital environment and doing assessments, getting basic vitals, sometimes computer charting. Had you worked with a cohort from Block 5 -- they would be passing out meds, EXCEPT IVs. Block 10 - all of above, basically precepting. I am proud to say that my cohort is a very dedicated bunch. Like I said, we're hopeful for codes to be nearby/accessible and are always curious about any procedures that we could sit in on and watch. We help the staff with vitals of course, do our assessments, answer call outs... all that jazz, I'm sure hospital staff appreciates all the extra hands. We text each other if there's something 'cool' going on that we could watch. We truly do put in a great team effort.
  11. ger_bearr

    Roseman BSN August 2016 Cohort

    Congratulations Jenny!
  12. ger_bearr

    Roseman University 18-month Program?

    Sorry that this response is happening after your interview, but hopefully it went well! hahaha
  13. ger_bearr

    Roseman University 18-month Program?

    Yes! Currently in block 3 clinicals. I love my cohort, we're all team players. As far as I know,we're also all eager to learn so I feel like we motivate each other to get through each block. Theres a few things I would change about how things are run, but other than that, I'm very glad I chose Roseman. Hopefully I see you around next year :)
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