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NurseDaddy2006

NurseDaddy2006

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  1. NurseDaddy2006

    How do you deal??

    I too know what you mean. I've worked on a unit with some nurses that seemed to have forgotten why they got into the line of work they are in. Hello? I get that you've been at it a long time. I get that you've got kids in college and you don't like where you're at but can't afford to quit. I get that you've heard all the stories and seen some of the frequent fliers a million times. But that does not negate the fact that the people we provide CARE to are people. Yes, they can push your buttons. Yes, they can be frustrating. But they are mentally ill, most often did not choose to be there, and are on the unit because they are not at their best at the moment. As nurses we unlock the door, let ourselves out with allowing a patient to elope, and go out to our car and drive home. How many of the people we call patients are able to do that? It was tough for me being the nurse on the unit that the patients got along with, went to for advice, felt comfortable confiding in. The others I worked with didn't get why that was. I'm sure they thought I was >this I guess I didn't deal very well with the situation being vented about, since I left that unit and inpatient psych altogether. But then again I'm not that skilled at playing the game... getting along... acting one way but thinking another. What I feel on the inside is on my outside most of the time. So I came to grips with the fact that I'd probably never be able to make that place work for me. I'm much happier at my new job, pretty much one of one, the sole nurse on my team here. So in summation, I can identify with what you're saying.
  2. NurseDaddy2006

    Why I'm a psych nurse, or I why I couldn't be any other kind.

    It's a long story, but suffice it to say that my instructors felt I'd stepped outside the boundaries of my role as a student nurse, after the nurses on the unit told them about the conversation I'd had with the patient. I thought I was helping, given my history and experience of living after loss, and I told them of the thanks I got from that mom after our conversation, but the faculty would not change their minds and I had to withdraw or get an F. I had a 92 average going into the finals. I also had to tell everyone that knew I was about to graduate that I might not, ever, if they didn't let me back in to take the last semester over. I also had to go on the celebratory cruise our family and friends had all booked, though I wasn't much fun to be around. People told me "sue them!", "appeal!", go the top and demand blah blah blah. Put it this way... those that tried that never got back in. I kept my mouth shut, accepted a seat a year later, breezed through the last semester, made sure my mother/baby rotation was at another hospital and the first rotation to go through, and kept my mouth shut when a patient on a med surge rotation told me she'd had a tough year because she lost her son (I was being tested for my resolve). I said "that must have been tough for you" and went about the rest of my duties. I think that what happened to me just adds to my ability to never let any sort of stigma cloud my impressions and assessments of the people I provide services to. ND
  3. NurseDaddy2006

    Why I'm a psych nurse, or I why I couldn't be any other kind.

    Thanks for the replies. Sometimes I find writing about how I got here helps me figure out where I am at the moment.
  4. It's been a long road to get here. Last night I had a dream that I was bad at my job and was being replaced, passed over for promotion, and then locked down by the powers that be on a subway platform with an environmental toxin that induced craziness. How's that for madness inducing? My dreams often feel so real that I wake up in quite the mood. Thankfully there was some positivity at work this morning, and I was able to get out of my funk. If I'm anything, it's resillient. Life's been no bed of roses. I'm a psych nurse today because that's the best kind of nurse for me to be. All the other things I've done in life I did because I had a knack for them. Some innate talent that served me well even if I didn't have the edumication to go along with it. When I went to nursing school as an adult, after being so many different things in life, I feared I could not be taught. Me? Taught something I didn't already have a knack for? Couldn't do guitar lessons, even with a musical ear. Couldn't stand art class, even with my keen asthetics. Writing? I can write but don't ask me to explain the rules of the English language. I play riffs on guitar or fills on drums that sound right to me. Same with writing. Not to mention that I had a learning disability I didn't know about until I was 34. As an adult with a clue on how my brain worked, I got my 4.0GPA and got into nursing school. Too bad with a half a day left before graduating I screwed up and got the boot. I had to retake the whole last semester. See my name here at AllNurses? 2006 isn't entirely correct. Sure I got my LPN in the interim, but I didnt graduate and become an RN until 2007 because of my mistake. See, my wife and I tried to have kids two years after we got married. 10 years and many failed attempts at treatments later, not to mention numerous miscarriages, we conceived. Only we lost our miracle boy two weeks before he was due. We managed to get lucky eight months later, and we have a miracle son if there ever was one. No more after him, just 4 more miscarriages. So when I lost my job in IT I became a stay-at-home dad. I decided to go to school to be a nurse shortly after. Toward the end I made the mistake of arranging to do my mother/baby rotation at the same hospital where we'd lost our son. I didn't see how volitile a situation that would be. It was to be the final rotation of clinicals, the long days, and I was convinced I was going to make a bad situation into something I could use to help others. With a day and a half before graduating, I talked to a mom about a twin she'd lost. I wasn't supposed to. I was so obssessed with helping, that I crossed too many boundaries. But now that time has gone by, I can see it needed to happen. Obssessed was a critical word in that last sentence of the previous paragraph. Shortly after being forced to withdraw, I had a conversation with an uncle that led to futher understanding of my actions. Like him and other members of my family, I am "Pure-O". I've got the obssessional component of OCD. So this, combined with all the other things I deal with, has been a major contributor to my being distracted, not "in the moment", unable to focus, stop worrying, etc. Meds help. No longer do I spend days so bent out of shape that nobody can stand to be around me. Now it's just a few hours tops. When I did graduate, Magna Cum Laude, it was a year after I was supposed to, but with a newfound understanding that life would be different from that point on. As soon as I got hired to work a med surge floor I knew I wanted to get out. I wasn't going to be able to work mother/baby and be there for those dads going through what I went through, but if I could get onto a psych unit, I'd be in the right place. 6 months later, I transferred to psych. I'm the nurse patients felt comfortable with. I was the one who was asked why the other nurses seemed to talk down to the patients. I spent time out on the floor, instead of hiding in the nurses station. I liked working with the patients. The staff, on the other hand... At my new job, I am a resource. I work on a team with a couple of social workers and a psychologist, and we provide training and consultation to the staff that provide direct care and case management to our 1600 or so consumers. We also get called in when consumers have issues their case managers can't seem to help them with. People are always telling me that they've never had a nurse here that can connect so well with the consumers, and they're thankful for that. Makes me feel like I'm in the right place in nursing. Doing something I apparently have a knack for. ND
  5. NurseDaddy2006

    psych HH with no psych experience

    That's the nail being hit squarely on the head. It takes a certain kind of nurse to work psych. It takes an understanding of the conditions, symptoms, behaviors, and an ability to look beyond what you're hearing from the patient and do an assessment of what all your senses, including your gut, tells you. It's also important to know what to document. People who make the decisions of who they hire for various psych nursing positions should also have an understanding of what the role really entails. People and their safety are at stake.
  6. NurseDaddy2006

    Any happy psych nurses?

    I'm a happy psych nurse, most of the time. When I worked on an inpatient psych unit, I was happiest when I had the chance to spend time talking with my patients. I could do without the politics of the unit. Now I work for an organization that provides services to the mentally ill in the community. Much happier here than on the unit. Mental health is the right place for me. I always say it takes one to know one. I've got my share of issues like anyone else, and I own them. I think it makes me better able to interact with the people we provide services to. I took one of our consumers food shopping the other day. We bought some cammomile tea. This helped her relax a bit when we got back to her apartment, so she could discuss what else was going on with her. I prefer to be outside the box. My intent is to return to school to become a psych NP so I can have my own practice. I like nursing, but I don't like the mindset of administration who worries more about the bottom line than about people - staff and the people staff takes care of. Give psych nursing some time. Days would be a better time to see all the interventions that make up psych nursing, to see which of them you're good at.
  7. NurseDaddy2006

    He's a nurse, let's get him to do the IMs

    So tomorrow makes 2 weeks since I gave the IM. Nobody has said anything about it to me since. Then this morning, the clinic director sends me a reminder email saying the patient is due for her IM tomorrow. Nobody ever told me this would be an ongoing thing. While I was at the clinic two weeks ago the doctor there asked me to inservice him on how to prepare the Risperdal Consta injection, so while I was making it ready, I went through it. He said he'd give the next one. So I responded back to the email saying the doctor had said he'd do it, but if need be I'd do it. They got back to me saying they'd prefer if I came up there and went over it again with the doctor and see that everything goes well with the IM, and if so he'll do it until they come up with another solution. Long and short of it, is I don't want to be the solution. Because that is not my role, she is not my patient, and my license is something I need to protect. I am here in a consultative position, and asking me to inject someone after they've told me I can't even check someone's blood glucose with a fingerstick just doesn't sit well.
  8. NurseDaddy2006

    Violence in Psychiatric Nursing

    And another thing, sparked by something I heard about the other day. We hope we're alert. But after numerous shifts, sometimes we're not. We don't always keep on our toes, but we hope that the unit as a whole is run well. This way there's adequate staffing, which means multiple sets of eyes and ears and people to back us up when something goes down. I guess we do the best we can. Since my prior post I heard about an unfortunate incident on a unit where better staffing and management would have been helpful in prevention. Sad.
  9. NurseDaddy2006

    Violence in Psychiatric Nursing

    One of the things to remember about nursing in general, is that the nurse gets report. One would hope that when shift change happens, anything that occurs with a patient or information on new patients is shared with the incoming shift. It is then that the nurse is best able to prepare for the shift they're about to undertake. We find out what PRNs were given, what behaviors were exhibited, and who's on or on their way to a one-to-one. In short, when you know your patients, you know who poses the potential threat and plan your approach accordingly. Are people unpredictable, sure. Is report always accurate, nah. But information on who your patients are is key to safety on the unit. ND
  10. NurseDaddy2006

    He's a nurse, let's get him to do the IMs

    So I came in this chilly monday morning to find an email from the senior VP to the clinic director, with a CC to me and my team leader saying "we've verified that our nurses are covered with malpractice insurance so I'd like Eric to go to the Bronx, review the chart, and give the Risperdal IM injection." Not once did she ever address me personally in this and ask me if I would. So my position which has always stipulated that I can not provide treatment, not even a finger stick, has now become one where I can give an IM? I guess I'm not given much choice in the matter. I've voiced my concerns and opinion but nobody hears me.
  11. NurseDaddy2006

    What is psych nursing like exactly?

    Let's see... I've done psych nursing two different ways now. I spent maybe six months working on a renal unit/med surge environment after graduation, and it wasn't for me. I wanted to be a psych nurse and got the opportunity to transfer to a large hospital's psych unit. Inpatient psych is something I did for 13 months or so, and I liked what I was doing. Working three 12s per week, days. Come in, get report, figure out which nurse is charting, which nurse is doing meds, who's charge for the shift. The unit census was usually 29 or so. Two teams, blue and green. Most shifts you had 14 patients to do meds or charting on. If you did meds, you were handing out 8's, 10's, 12's, 14s, 15s, and 18s. Any diabetics on your team you're doing fingersticks and acting accordingly. You'd give any PRNS. Chart those. Answer the door. the phone. Get socks. Open the laundry. Encourage sharing of the payphone. Break up disputes. Run a med group. Run a stress reduction group. I liked patient interaction and discussion. I didn't like admissions. Preferred discharges. For me, the biggest issue was with co-workers. That unit was known amongst area hospitals as a place that chews nurses up and spits them out. In fact, when I interviewed at another hospital I was told "you lasted 13 months there? You've got what it takes then. You're hired". LOL. I left that unit and was out of work for a while. Then I landed my current job. Outpatient psych is something I've been doing since August 09. I work for an organization that has some congregate sites with folks who came from area institutions and are being treated and supported for a transition back into the community. We also have apartments with three consumers in them, followed by our case managers. We've got clinics too. At this job, I get paid to think. It's an oversight/consultant/trainer/educator/harm reduction kind of thing. I write training programs and train new hires on mental illness and medication. I intervene when incidents occur. I step in when it looks as though someone fell through the cracks. I only write notes on people I meet with. I run groups. I create signage (on typical stuff like smoking, and diabetes, and what is hypertension). I consult with staff when they don't understand a new diagnosis or medication someone came back from the doctor with. I work Monday through Friday with no weekends, holidays, or on call. I also make a lot less than I would working a psych unit. But I'm happy. Its the first job I've ever had in any field I've ever worked in, where I don't find myself trying to find ways to get out of it into something better. It's the first time I've been able to say I really like my job.
  12. NurseDaddy2006

    He's a nurse, let's get him to do the IMs

    Hi, Thanks to those that replied. An update on the situation: I called a nurse consultant that used to work with us here, and she agreed that what was being proposed (stepping outside my oversight position and injecting people) was unrealistic, inefficient use of my time, and probably not in the best interest of our consumers. Thankfully I have a team leader that is willing to listen, and she took note of my concerns and spoke to the senior VP (the psychiatrist who thought the clinic's doctors should have to be the ones injecting their patients). During our weekly supervision meeting with the VP she said "thank you for bringing up your nursing concerns that you had {team leader} share with me. I hadn't thought of that. I'll meet with the other VPs and let you know when we figure out what we'll do". That's where its at, for now. We'll see what more comes of it. ND
  13. I'm working for an organization that provides residential and clinical services to the mentally ill. I'm the RN on a clinical resource team. We provide educational interventions and support for consumers and program staff when incidents occur, and intervene before they occur in order to keep our consumers safe. I work along side two social workers and a psychologist. Our team leader is one of the social workers. We are overseen by a psychiatrist. The organization's mental health clinics apparently do not have any nurses on staff, and the psychiatrists there are giving the IMs. The psychiatrist who over sees the CRT is now thinking it's appropriate to get me to do the IMs instead. When I started I was told that my role here was for consulting, advising, educating, and that I could not even do a finger stick to measure blood glucose. No treatment on any of the 1600 mental health consumers. That's the job of the treatment teams they see, as I was told. Now they want me to drive to all our sites so I can inject people who are patients at the clinics since they don't have a nurse? A few things come to mind: They're not my patients. I'm not supposed to be doing anything invasive, so I was told. The patients are being followed psychiatrically at the clinics, of which I'm not an employee. I'm an unknown to the consumer, as they are to me. I need to know who's going to monitor for side effects, not send people back out into the community and say see ya in two weeks for another risperdal consta. Who's got the medical info I need to know before I put a needle in someone? My gut tells me I won't be practicing safely if I do it. Any thoughts? Thanks. ND
  14. I'm working for an organization that provides residential and clinical services to the mentally ill. I'm the RN on a clinical resource team. We provide educational interventions and support for consumers and staff when incidents occur, and intervene before they occur in order to keep our consumers safe. I work along side two social workers and a psychologist. Our team leader is one of the social workers. We are overseen by a psychiatrist. The organization's mental health clinics apparently do not have any nurses on staff, and the psychiatrists there are giving the IMs. The psychiatrist who over sees the CRT is now thinking it's appropriate to get me to do the IMs instead. When I started I was told that my role here was for consulting, advising, educating, and that I could not even do a finger stick to measure blood glucose. No treatment on any of the 1600 mental health consumers. THat's the job of the treatment teams they see. Now they want me to drive to all our sites so I can inject people who are not my patients? A few things come to mind: They're not my patients. I'm not supposed to be doing anything invasive, so I was told. The patients are being followed psychiatrically at the clinics, of which I'm not an employee. I'm an unknown to the consumer, as they are to me. I need to know who's going to monitor for side effects, not send people back out into the community and say see ya in two weeks for another risperdal consta. Who's got the medical info I need to know before I put a needle in someone? My gut tells me I won't be practicing safely if I do it. Any thoughts? THanks.
  15. NurseDaddy2006

    Hope: Losing a Child

    MY wife and I went through ten years of infertility struggles. All sorts of failed treatments. We started to conceive, and then misscarry all of four pregnancies at 6 weeks. We flew to Chicago to see a doctor that had appeared on Oprah. We tried his methods, even though they were not covered by insurance. After spending our emotions, efforts, and money we did not have, we were ready to give up. We called a NY infertility clinic in January. Next available appointment was July. So much for our one last effort. We hung up, we gave up. We celebrated our 12th wedding anniversary in February. We found out in March that were were pregnant again. When we saw that heartbeat on the sono, we were beyond any emotions that could be written here. We had a picture perfect pregnancy. Two weeks before our boy was due, my wife celebrated with her coworkers, we went out to eat that last night preparing for a life that was to change, celebrating how we would finally become a family, finally become parents. The next morning my wife awoke and told me that she'd slept so well, and she did not feel any movement. We took our time getting to the hospital because this had happened before and we felt silly after a perfect sono. When the nurse put the sono pickup to my wife's belly and our son was gone, our world was crushed. Jacob Sebastian was born with his cord around his neck twice, around his torso, and his legs. He'd gotten tangled up and cut off from his supply. We lost our miracle boy. With many thoughts of packing it in and leaving a note behind, we found the courage to go on and to try again. Eight months would go by and we were not getting anywhere. We figured we'd had and lost the only child we'd ever get to hold. During a sono to see that everything was alright, my wife was told that she had an egg a couple of days away from being released. That was Tuesday. We made love Thursday. We left Saturday on a cruise. We were on a docked boat and my wife threw up. We got home and took a test. Bingo. We were absolute maniacs for the next 37 weeks until we induced. Born healthy and perfect, our son is now 7, and truly a miracle boy if there ever was one. He knows of his brother, and has his brother's first name as his middle name. We went through 4 more miscarriages since he was born, and now we're at the age that we just can't do it anymore. I became a nurse because I wanted to help people the way we were helped when we went through our crisis. Now I enjoy nursing in behavioral health, helping people through crisis. Unfortunately I left my last job thinking I could find another, and find that I can not. It's no fun being without the money, but it gives me time to be there for my son, and I'm glad today I got to go to his 1st grade science fair. ND
  16. Hi all, I'm an RN since 2007, and I worked six months or so on a med surg unit, then transferred to psych where I worked 13 months. I enjoyed working with the population, there was an issue with staff that made it tough. So I left to go work for an organization that operates some group homes in my area. Almost 30 or more, I think. In any case, during the interview, they liked that I had psych experience. They felt that my IT experience would be helpful too, because they do everything on paper, and want to some day get away from paper. So every night after work I dusted off my IT rustiness and worked on creating a program that could keep me organized in the work I was to do as a residential RN. I've got A.D.D. and O.C.D. and the computer not only helped me get through school, but I was convinced it would help me to do a great job. My bosses, well, not so much. After 6 weeks they called me in to the office and chewed me a new one. Long and short of it was they had nothing positive to say about me. Their words. And in their words, my psych experience meant nothing. I was not good at filing the papers. That was what they focused on. And they forbid me from using my laptop. I told them that I'd disclosed during my interview that it was a valuable tool for me to help me with my own developmental disabilities, so they told me to talk to HR. I did. HR told me to go back to the bosses. They continued to forbid me. Then they wanted to extend my orientation by another 30 days so they could have someone sit and observe everything I did to make sure I was putting the papers in the right place. I tend to think logically, but they had three binders per individual in the home, and copies of things had to go numerous places, and all the forms you needed to do the job were mostly copies of copies that were askew... I resigned the next day. But they never did get a copy of my software, so that's mine. If you want to see it, take a look at http://www.grouphomeware.com I've stopped developing it for now, but I'm thinking of marketing it to nurses that take care of people in group homes. I wanted some local agencies to let me demo it for them, but no bites yet. Meantime I'm unemployed, and I never thought it'd be so tough for a guy like me to get work in behavioral health again. It's like no one will have me. I'm also pursuing informatics, so I can use my 7 years of IT experience for something. I've been without work since March and it's been tough. Well, thanks for reading. ND
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