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Mlee81

Mlee81

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Mlee81's Latest Activity

  1. Does anyone have recommendations for online RN to BSN programs that follow the following criteria? 1) Cheap Tuition - Under 200 a credit is ideal 2) Short-Term Semesters - This is ideal for my scenario in collection of TUITION REIMBURSEMENT through my place of employment as I'm not eligible to receive tuition reimbursement until after the semester is completed. The place of employment also allocates so much money per CALENDAR YEAR. So I'm looking to maximize TR for 2019 AND 2020. Also I'll add 3) 3 to 6 credit as considered "Part-Time" to be eligible for "In School" deferment. Unlike many others that want to complete their degree ASAP, I'm ok with delaying to two years as that would maximize my capabilities to have work pay for school as I'm paying out of pocket. If I play my cards right, I am looking for work to pay 80% of school if at all possible. Thanks for any insight.
  2. Mlee81

    265 questions is almost guaranteed if your a male.

    Male student finished 99th percentile with Med Surge and OB/Peds along with over 90 percent with Med Surge 1 with Psychiatric. I outperformed the majority of my class (I was the only male out of 18 students total initially). These are for all HESI programs. My teacher stated I had the highest score in Med Surge she's ever seen. Scheduled to take the NCLEX and will pass it in less than 100 questions. Just maybe your claim is biased. I'll also add unsupported by nothing more than your experience. So a question could be are these your personal experiences with men acting out with your emotions at play here? Something to look into.
  3. I got a 1220 on my first Med Surge exam. A 1315 on my second Med Surge exam. << this last score was the highest my instructor has ever seen since the beginning of HESI. 1187 on my Peds/OB. All of these tests were in the "99th percentile". Supposedly these results include all programs participating in HESI. I haven't had under a 900. I didn't even study for a couple of them. I've attached my results in case someone calls BS. Anyhow I will not be happy if this does not translate to the NCLEX. The entire process of nursing school has been a frustrating attempt to learn running in circles. I'd have done better if I didn't have to go to class and learned the material my way. As a new grad, I've decided to just schedule the NCLEX and "trust the process" that so many claim is the answer instead of waiting a couple months working on my state GN permit studying the material. We will see. If I do not pass, I will lose my position GN position, be out of $400+, and basically be out of work. I'm attempting a 2 week NCLEX crash course of my own design. I will report back whether pass or fail. Needless to say I will be pretty upset if the results do not come back as passing.
  4. Mlee81

    How To Prepare for Last Semester Nursing

    Will have to check out the ICU book you stated as this is the area I'd like to focus on when I get out. Appreciate the responses.
  5. Mlee81

    How To Prepare for Last Semester Nursing

    Appreciate the responses, and I'll look into both recommendations.
  6. Mlee81

    How To Prepare for Last Semester Nursing

    I'm not a big fan of the process at our program. I learn better in my own way. I already have EKGs down since my last post. I have a month to prepare and put me ahead of the game, but I'm not sure what exactly to focus on. The syllabus isn't available for another month. I'm trying to get ahead of the game to put myself in the best position I can as I have to continue to manage a full-time job along with finishing out school.
  7. As a student in a ADN program that just passed 3rd semester, I'd like to get an early start on next semester to help the transition. What do you think I can do right now in this month left prior to the last semester to prepare me to do well? It's interesting I've had a really tough time finding the answer out to this question. I have been reviewing my Saunder's NCLEX book, looking at EKG's, etc. Focusing currently on cardiac. Thoughts?
  8. Mlee81

    When to delegate vital signs?

    Searched for this an it came up. The NCLEX follows more of a mechanical paradigm I find more so than critically thinking. For example. Are vital signs for blood transfusions to be delegated to a UAP? According to my Med Surg Text 10th edition pg 469, both the baseline vitals as well as after the first 15 minutes CAN BE taken and delegated to a UAP. From other sources on NCLEX, it appears they want the "licensed nurse" to take these vitals then all other vitals per company policy. NCLEX doesn't give preference to who the UAP is or whether that person individually is competent enough. It's either black or white. On a select all that apply question, you either click it the button or you don't on what can be delegated. It also states that the UAP can "obtain blood products form the blood bank as directed by the RN". Other sources on NCLEX state that it must be two licensed NURSES verifying the client's number with the blood product number from the blood bank. Finding good information for what they want on NCLEX is a challenge at times. Does anyone know of a RELIABLE review text that I can study while in the program to verify that I am learning the correct information for the NCLEX test? Preferably by system/topic. I'd like to study this and prepare as I go along so I'm not attempting to cram for this test at the end. Also I have a tough time studying information when I don't know if it is 100 percent reliable.
  9. Mlee81

    Paramedic Vs Registered Nurse: knowledge

    Currently an EMT-B working in EMS for a local ambulance companies while attending nursing school. A couple of interesting points: 1) BOTH Nurses and Paramedics are under "Standing Orders"/ Protocols. Both require verbal or written "orders" by a physician/HCP to execute OUTSIDE of those orders. So the entire concept of one working without orders while the other does is a fallacy. 2) BOTH Nurses and Paramedics Assess, "Diagnose", Implement, and Evaluate. "Diagnose" in quotes meaning both are use their assessment knowledge in emergencies (WHICH IS EXACTLY THE SAME) to help determine an underlining cause to treat the symptoms STAT with the standing orders/protocols/Contact Medical Command/HCP allows. "Diagnose" is not referring to the actual "Medical Diagnosis" the HCP will designate post testing, etc. 3) BOTH provide much of the same MEDICATIONS for these acute emergency situations on a daily basis. The RN; however, has a VASTLY INCREASED NUMBER of meds/routes, etc that they are responsible for. For skills that the Paramedic is expected to be much better than an RN include: 1) ET intubation - The Physicians in the ER do this the majority of the time. Paramedics are responsible for this in the unit. 2) Decompression - IBID 3) Cricothyroidotomy - IBID ETC.. so Paramedics are more apt to do things in an EMERGENCY SITUATION that generally the ER Doc would be doing in the ER. This continues to be a HUGE issue because ultimately RNs get paid more than Paramedics. There will always be a urine shooting match to see who can shoot farther. There is very much an overlap. As one looking to obtain the RN as well as challenge the Medic test (allowed in my current state), I believe that would be MUCH EASIER (not saying it will be easy) to go that route than the other way around. I also have EXPERIENCE working in EMS. So for me the issue would be to simply focus and train on the few skills that nursing doesn't focus on. Paramedics are very strong in two systems primarily 1) Cardiac 2) Respiratory Which comprise at least over 80% of our calls. Endocrine for Diabetics mostly.
  10. Mlee81

    Got Accepted into BOTH ADN and BSN Programs

    I appreciate all the comments. While I am still working the details of both the programs, I'm heavily leaning on the ADN route as i can still work in both my EMS and tutor capacities with the potential to pay for the program out of pocket. That might just be too good of a deal to turn down. I can always pursue the BSN at a later time while working then also maintaining my overall debt load better. I'd be getting out 8 months later with the same capacity to work as a RN with hopefully no more debt.
  11. Mlee81

    Got Accepted into BOTH ADN and BSN Programs

    I've heard the same regarding competitiveness also. I currently have a 3.7 cumulative with a 3.9 last sixty credits, much of which was pre-med classes heavy in the physical and biological sciences. The whole thing is a numbers game. I've been asking myself that question, and the answer has been a resounding no, but I've had a couple nurses recommend I just go for the BSN getting the loans out an all. And so I wonder if there is something then I don't know.
  12. Mlee81

    Got Accepted into BOTH ADN and BSN Programs

    I hear both sides all the time. It apparently has everything to do with one's local market. I hear people tell me that places are only hiring BSN, and I'm sure that's true in some markets. I don't see that around my location at the moment however. I'm hoping my background as well as the fact I do actually already have two degrees in which one is a bachelor's degree means something. The ADN program here is MUCH more accommodating when it comes to cost, working while in the program, etc. I just got off the phone with an advisor yesterday from the BSN. They recommended not working, which will of course eliminate my health insurance which would have to be purchased then through the school. Estimated costs were $3450/year. So add that as well as the other various fees onto the 32,500 estimated tuition costs. Add a year and a quarter of lost wages due to not working, and the whole thing gets pretty expensive. All of which pretty much would have to be financed through private loans. I'm not even sure I should be thinking that it's an option anymore.
  13. Mlee81

    Got Accepted into BOTH ADN and BSN Programs

    I haven't actually yet. I'm still very much working to decide which one to go to, or if I can actually even do the accelerated BSN due to a number of factors.
  14. Mlee81

    Question for nurses that are male...

    It's simply true, and for anyone that has studied the issue, the entire concept of "women inequality" has more to do with politics than reality. Your responses tell me you've been drinking the kool-aid as well. The bottom line, if any coworker calling a male nurse a "murse" should be handled the same way a man would be calling a women anything else than the politically correct norm nowadays. Anything else is a double standard. Also on the fat, old, ugly, bitter nurse, we don't seem to have a shortage of them. Congrats on the achievement! The industry would do well to have more male influence IMO, and there is a clear reason a male gets paid more as a nurse in many settings, albeit how small that difference may be. It's supply, demand, as well as the other traits a man brings to the table such as less call offs, more reliable, more physical, less backstabbing drama among coworkers, etc.. If women want to be "equal" in other settings such as business, they can also take on the "equality" of the required hours worked, productivity standards etc. Just the facts.
  15. Mlee81

    Question for nurses that are male...

    If a male did that in our day and age they'd be lynched and broadcast on every media network. It's interesting how the double standards tend to work.
  16. Mlee81

    Question for nurses that are male...

    Just call them "nurse". It is interesting to note the sexism still among the nursing profession. Male nurses have been increasing proportionally.
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