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HOPEforRNs

HOPEforRNs ADN, BSN, MSN

Education, Skills & Simulation, Med/Surg, Pharm

CNE, CHSE

Member Member Educator Nurse
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HOPEforRNs has 12 years experience as a ADN, BSN, MSN and specializes in Education, Skills & Simulation, Med/Surg, Pharm.

HOPEforRNs's Latest Activity

  1. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    I have said multiple times that CNO is my end goal - assistant nurse manager is what I want to make my entry point. No, I am 100% not dumb enough to get hired as a CNO right now. I am not qualified. I am trying to get a job as an assistant nurse manager to start and then work my way up. My EdD is from my employer. I work for a teaching hospital that is part of a large university. I believe we are in the top 10 largest hospitals in the US with over 1,000 beds and 8 or 9 hospitals on the campus. You think that the job I did full-time for 4 years + 6 years contingent (24 hours a month and full-time in the Summer) is inadequate for "the next step" and that I need to go back to doing it full-time for... how long exactly? What piece am I missing from only being full-time in the Summer and otherwise contingent? Or is it because I have been off for 10 months? Or does my primary job being in academia make the other stuff I am doing negate itself since academia is apparently a useless career that anyone off the street can do?
  2. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    And going from a bedside RN to a charge RN to leadership on the academic side and then back to a bedside RN and charge RN is going to somehow make me realize how much I didn't know when I went in one direction? Do I have to go back the other way now? Have you worked in both academic leadership and hospital leadership? Or are you trying to tell me I should go do a job I have already done to get experience doing something I have already done a large chunk of? Or are you purely speculating?
  3. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    Bedside nursing does not give leadership experience. Nor does it give management experience. And having been a bedside nurse and charge nurse and moved on to leadership/management on the nursing student side... charge nurse is not really a leadership/management position either. I learned WAY more in my first few years in academia that would be relevant to working as a nurse/charge than I ever did actually at the bedside. I think people that work only on the hospital side don't really get what happens on the other side and do not have an appropriate level of respect for it.
  4. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    Well, an occasional charge nurse is the only option. At all the hospitals in my area.... after you've been a nurse for 2 years you have to go to training to be a charge nurse and you get put in the rotation to take a charge assignment. Being a charge nurse is not a regular assignment - everyone rotates through it. Also - I would think you would never find someone with 10+ years of in-house experience in management and leadership willing to take an assistant nurse manager position on a unit. They'd likely want to be higher up than that. Where do you see ANMs requiring 10+ years of leadership and management experience? And if you need 10+ years to get that job... what type of experience is it?
  5. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    I never said I was looking to get hired as a CNO right now. I'm looking for an ANM position. So I can start working my way up. I worked 4 years full-time as a bedside RN as well as occasional charge nurse (as everyone did). I stayed on contingent until my 3rd kid was born almost a year ago. Personally, I do not see the benefit of returning to the bedside full-time. I'd be losing my M-F childcare, halving my salary, and losing weekends and holidays with my family. And what would I gain that is essential that I didn't have from precepting, being a clinical instructor, working 4 years as a bedside RN (an sometimes as charge) + 6 years contingent as a bedside RN with only 1 year away from a bedside RN but maintaining time at the bedside as a clinical instructor? Seems to be like the cost is way higher than the gain.
  6. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    Yes, I worked 4 years as a bedside RN full-time before going into academia. However, I remained working contingent (and worked quite a bit in the Summer) until my third child was born almost a year ago. At that point, I had inadequate childcare or childcare that would result in a financial loss so I left the bedside altogether. I may reevaluate next year when my oldest starts kindergarten. It's just not my primary job. I do it because I feel like anyone who teaches nurses should know what is going on at the bedside. The CNO agrees I would be great in the position, despite my experience being atypical. But she also knows me moderately well at this point. She agrees my approach is atypical and it is unfortunate that hospitals are so linear in what they look for. She also wishes hospitals would diversify their administration. How do you know my doctorate degree doesn't prepare me? I mean, no degree in the world is alone sufficient to prepare someone for a role like that. But the degree is 50% designed to prepare healthcare educators for leadership positions in academia and 50% designed to prepare healthcare professionals for healthcare management/leadership positions. I'll be sure to let the program know you think 50% of their degree is adequate.
  7. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    I take 8 students at a time to the hospital (total of 32 in a week). I lead a classroom of 170 students or so. In the lab setting, I teach 80 students a week. I lead college-wide committees. In the summers, when I work as a clinical educator, I am in charge of the onboarding of all med/surg nurses, often rotating around hospitals and units to check in with management, preceptors, and the new hire nurses. I usually manage about 40 nurses or so at a time. I work collaboratively with the preceptor and unit manager and ultimately write a report that goes to the person in charge of new hire nurse education for the whole health system (I do med/surg specifically). Sure, will I have to learn the ins and outs of how that unit and the hospital run? Yep. But that's way easier to teach someone than how to be a good leader and a good manager. And unfortunately, from my experiences and the experiences of many others... they promote those with the knowledge of the unit and the hospital but aren't good leaders. The latter is much harder to teach.
  8. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    I fully understand it will happen. I'm not opposed to it across the board. I'd just prefer evenings/nights/weekends to not be my standard working hours. My FIL is c-suite for a local health system and I've had several dinners over the years with their CNO. I am well aware of what the hours entail.
  9. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    How often? Is it safe to have management (especially over multiple units) jump in and take a full patient load when they may not be doing that actual job very often? Would it be a safer / better alternative to have them take shifts as a resource person to help out on the unit? I am sure that person would be kept very busy as units are always short staffed. I'd strongly prefer not to. We have 3 major health systems in the big city where I live. I work for a state academic medical center now and have a pension... the kind where I'm set for life if I retire from here and lose it all if I leave.
  10. HOPEforRNs

    Management Progression Assistance

    Hello! I have been an RN for 11 years. I have spent the past 7 years working full-time as a nursing professor. I have my BSN and MSN (nursing education) and I am finishing up my EdD in healthcare leadership. My long-term career goal is a Chief Nursing Officer or Chief Nurse Executive. I have not worked as a bedside RN for the past few years outside of contingent in the Summer (off work as a professor), but I do take students to the hospital for clinical, teach in the skills lab, and teach in the classroom. I also work as a contingent clinical educator for a local health system. I'm also involved in committee leadership, mentoring, and research. Given my upcoming graduation, I decided to look into jobs to transition into a leadership role within the hospital setting. Basically, they do not consider my doctorate degree as any experience or leg up nor do they consider my academic leadership experience as relevant. I have been told by all recruiters that I would need to start at the beginning -- go back to a bedside nurse, then charge nurse, then assistant nurse manager, then nurse manager, then director, etc etc etc.... Any advice here? I'd really like to not go back to a bedside nurse. I love not working nights/evenings/weekends/holidays all the time. I have a lot of leadership experience in academia and I will have a doctorate in healthcare leadership soon. Send help! Any ideas of what I can do here?
  11. HOPEforRNs

    MSN Nursing Education - Worth it?

    There is a huge nursing faculty shortage. This is directly correlated with the nursing shortage. So many qualified applicants are turned away every year. However, keep in mind that if you teach in a BSN program or above you will need a doctorate. But a MSN is the first step. Most our hires are in a BSN-DNP program and work as TAs and get hired on after they graduate.
  12. HOPEforRNs

    MSN Nursing Education - Worth it?

    Great advice in this post. You can always add an educator certificate to an APRN master's degree if you want both. I knew I had no desire to be a NP. I am getting my EdD currently - I love it. Great choice! And I agree not all programs are created equal. The for profit schools are diploma mills out to make a profit. I would avoid them. Go to a reputable school.
  13. HOPEforRNs

    Do Grades Matter?

    Hello! I am currently pursuing my EdD. I have always been someone who strived to achieve all As and came very close in my ADN and did achieve it in my BSN and MSN. I am now pursuing an EdD. I need to maintain a 3.0 GPA and obtain a B or better to pass my classes. Beyond that - do grades matter now? Is there a difference between an A or a B at this stage? Or will it only matter that I graduated and what my research/dissertation is? Obviously I will do my best work regardless but relieving some of the stress surrounding not getting that "perfect grade" will help my mental status if someone can convince me it won't matter at the end of the day if I get a 3.0, 3.5, or 4.0.
  14. HOPEforRNs

    MSN Nursing Education - Worth it?

    I am not sure any quality program will award you a MSN in only 1 year. Most programs are 1.5 - 2 years long. Also, to do a post master's program at Frontier University, your master's degree has to be in a field that makes you an APRN so a master's in nursing education or nursing leadership will not qualify. You may be able to get some transfer credit but would have to do the traditional MSN route at Frontier still. Also, post master's programs do not qualify for federal financial aid since they do not lead to a degree. I would recommend looking at the University of Cincinnati as I believe you can do a post master's PMHNP with a MSN in nursing education. And yes - you are right. The entire nursing shortage is because there is a massive nursing faculty shortage that is about to get a lot worse!
  15. HOPEforRNs

    Is there a CLINICAL DNP?

  16. HOPEforRNs

    Clarkson College EdD

    You sound similar to me! I have no interest in a PhD as I don't want to beg for money as part of my job and have requirements to publish and present. I do enjoy research, but the requirement would take all the enjoyment out of it for me. Plus, I am more of a QI project and publish it type of person than a new novel contribution of a PhD level person. Like you mentioned, the DNP is not an education degree. CCNE won't accredit an education based DNP. Ohio State University is creating a new degree, a DNE, for this very reason. It's for those who want to teach without being researchers. However, it requires clinical experience and it is still a few years away. I always wanted an EdD as my master's is a MSN in nursing education. I wanted a broader perspective of higher education and adult learning. However, those programs don't qualify for NFLP and I am not taking out more student loans. Then I found Clarkson College. The EdD is in healthcare education and leadership. So I love that the education component is more broad and I love that I get to pull in the leadership piece too. But it's still specific enough that I was able to get NFLP funding. I wanted a unicorn and it took me 4.5 years to find. I start next month. I am SO excited. I've heard from several graduates that it's a high quality program. It's also a "real" school. Capella is a diploma mill for profit school. That's why you hear horror stories. Clarkson is a private nonprofit school that is affiliated with Univ of Nebraska Medicine. I haven't even started but I would highly recommend it!