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Nei77

Nei77 MSN

Step Down, Cath Lab, Health Coach, Education
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Nei77 has 5 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Step Down, Cath Lab, Health Coach, Education.

Nei77's Latest Activity

  1. March 20, 2019.
  2. I am more than happy to help. You can PM me if you want.
  3. Nei77

    Transitioning to Nurse Educator?

    I live in NC, although I know the pay varies from city to city within the state. I interviewed at Chamberlain and the pay was $50/hour clinical instructor, but they require a lot of paperwork so it would add up at least 5-7 hours weekly of extra work outside of clinicals which would bring the actual pay per hour a little lower. I have a friend that just accepted at ECPI and they are paying her $40/hour. I also have a friend in Miami, FL working for a technical school like ECPI and she is getting paid $45/hourly. And I know at the community college for the ASN program the pay is $42/hour. I did my MSN-Ed at Western Governors University WGU. I loved it! It is self-paced so you can do as little or as much as you want, the trick is...the longer you take to finish the degree the more expensive it is. The tuition is a set rate per semester regardless of the number of courses. The tuition is around $3700 to$4000 per semester. I finished my degree in 10 months. I paid monthly and the total was close to $8000 for my masters, without any debt left. It is CCNE accredited. Of course, I did not have a social life during that time, but I had a goal in mind. Contrary to what some people believe, I feel that I learned a lot. The two things I did not like about the program was having to talk to my mentor every other week (this is very personal because I did not need to be mentored as I was very motivated but I understand other people might need it and I appreciated the service). The other thing was that I was a guinea pig for the program. They had just launched that program the same day that I started, so it was working progress, and I came along discrepancies in the program that drove me mad. I made notes and emailed my instructor about them every time for clarification. My capstone instructor was AMAZING!!!!! She helped me prepare for the interview at the school where I received an offer for full-time faculty. I know this message is long, but I wish I could have found somebody to talk to when I was in the process that you are now. Good luck with everything!
  4. I did mine at WGU, I really enjoyed it and I feel that I learned a lot. I believe in the online programs you get what you put into it. The program is at your own pace, so you can either take it slow or accelerate through the program. The tuition is per semester, not per credit hour, so it is very affordable. I finished mine in 10 months. and Paid 8K. It was hard work, I did not have a social life during those 10 months, but that was my goal. They are starting an FNP program Spring of 2020. Good luck with your search!
  5. Nei77

    Transitioning to Nurse Educator?

    Here is my personal experience I hope it helps. I started teaching Med Surg I Clinicals as an adjunct for the same, not for profit public university I completed my BSN at, I did this with my BSN. Even though I enjoyed it, I did this while still working in an acute setting and did not enjoy having to grade papers during the weekends. As I was doing that as an Adjunct twice a week, I was completing my MSN-Ed online. Then, I quit my acute care job and started teaching part-time at the community college in my city for the CNA program. In my state, the students have to complete a CNA program to be accepted into nursing school so it is like a Fundamentals course. The CNA teaching, although not nursing, it gave me the classroom experience. I completed my masters and got offered a 9-month Lecturer position at the same school that I was teaching the clinical for the BSN program. On the pay side, I got paid $35/hour for the nursing clinicals as an adjunct (they pay $42/hour with a completed master), and $37/hour for the CNA program. The 9-month lecturer position pay is 65k to 70k depending on clinical and didactic experience. What I know about the 9-month contract based on talking with other faculty...... I would have to teach 24 credits a year which equals to 3 courses a semester so It can be something like 2 clinicals and 1 course. I don't have to be on campus if the students are not there, so I get 3 weeks off for Christmas and about 10 in the summer. I get all the holidays, spring break, school recess off. The pay is spread out in 12 months so I don't spend the summer without a paycheck. You do have to be involved in committees and of course curriculum and development. I have the option to teach online during the summers for extra income. If I want a Professor position or teach online for strictly online schools, like WGU, you do need a terminal degree (DNP, Ph.D.) I hope this helps, you can PM me if you would like. Good luck in your future endeavors.
  6. Nei77

    Need an MSN-ed for a brief interview

    Hi, did you find somebody for the interview? I have the MSN-Ed but I have been teaching clinicals for a BSN program I have no lecture experience. I have taught CNA courses, I don't know if that experience qualifies for your interview. If it does I would be happy to help.
  7. Nei77

    WGU MSN then postgrad NP cert

    This is an old post, but I have a question what are the 3p's?
  8. Nei77

    Charlotte, NC EHR's

    Novant uses EPIC, CHS uses CERNER.
  9. Nei77

    Non-clinical nursing - What is out there?

    Hi, Sarah, I know this post is old. Like you I do not believe in western medicine practices and I have been a nurse for 3 years working in a hospital. Even though I do not believe in western medicine. I believe this is where nursing comes in place. We are the ones that make the patients comfortable, we can help address their concerns and work in the spiritual sense more than the medicinal if that makes sense. I work at an outpatient procedure center, but I had a patient that needed to stay for more than 6 hours. His wife was very tired sitting in our chairs. I got her a recliner, a pillow and a warm blanket. That is not medicine. That is all it took for the patient and family to be happy, my patient eve hugged me. On another note, I do health coaching for another company, and I really enjoy that job. I go to big factories where people need basic health education: diabetes, HTN, DLE. It gives me great satisfaction when the patients learn about their chronic diseases and learn new diets, how to search the web for info, exercises, meal preparation, lifestyle changes. I now applied at another job at an allergy and asthma place. I know it sounds nuts, but my three jobs are PRN and honestly I looooove the variety of nursing. I like that place because even though is western medicine, it helps patients so much to live a normal life. Another thing you can do is get a certificate in Coding and Billing along with your RN I know there are places hiring. Le me know what you ended up doing.
  10. Hi Cate1987. By your OP name, I am going to assume you are 10 years younger than me :). I am 39 years old now, this is my second career. I have a bachelor's in business and decided to go into nursing for two reasons. This is my personal opinion, everybody is different. I won't fluffy it up. One because I went trough a horrible divorce and found myself not making ends meet for me and my pets (7 of them inlcuding an american bulldog with a wheelchair). Two because I wanted something that I did not have to sit in front of a desk every day from mon-fri, I needed some variety. So there I went into nursing for job security. I come from a country where nursing doesn't exist, so I kinda had an idea of what it was because I was administrator of a home health agency for several years, but I did not know how much nurses did. Before starting nursing school I volunteered at a hospital to get an idea. And I really liked it. I started nursing school at 34 and finished at 36. My first job was at the famous very busy, med surg floor. It was a step down unit. Within 3 weeks off orientation I was completely regreting my decision. I couldn't sleep, did not have a chance to eat, got UTIs because I did not have a change to empty my bladder in 10-12 hours. I used to wake up in the middle of the night and call the night shift and told them stuff I thought I had missed on report. I guess I was too dedicated. I lost 10 lbs (not a bad thing), was sick all the time although I never called out sick until I got the flu. I was there for 7 months and decided I could not do it anymore. I just followed everybody elses advice on getting into med surg first. I decided I was never going to work in the hospital setting ever! But in the middle of everything that I hated about the hospital there was something I realized I loved, and that is patient care. The gratification I felt when making a difference in someone's life is incredible. Mind you, not every patient is nice or gratefull, but the other ones make up for it. I was lucky enough to go to a speed interview session at a hospital, and met the Cath Lab manager. She gave me the opportunity. She said that despite the fact I did not have that much experience she knew experience could be acquired at any moment on any floor as long as you have the attitute and the willingess. I read some post here that said otherwise. I was afraid to take that job because of that. Well, I have been in that unit 2 years and I love it. It is true, that there are some med surg things that I might not know, but there are always resources. In my hospital they are hiring new grads in every unit, trough the nurse residency program. Even PACU and ICU. Now, on a regular unit you might not find the work life balance you want, weekends, holidays, long hours. But there are other units like mine, or ambulatory surgery, clinics, PACU, that you won't have that problem. I love nursing because opportunities are endless, you can try so many things. Right now I am working PRN at the cath lab and PRN at an asthma and allergy clinic. I also work as a health coach 2 a month. I love the variety. So, my personal experience, you don't have to start on a med surg floor. It would give you the foundation needed for any other floor for sure, but it is not necessary. Sorry for my long post, I wish I had found somebody that could have help me out with this issue when I started, although I don't regret going into med surg because now I know I will never go back to it. PM me if you have any more questions.
  11. Nei77

    Why I'm leaving nursing

    I truly admire you and I feel your pain. As another OP said, you are appreciated. Not by management anyways but by your fellow nurses and patients. I have found nursing jobs outside of the hospital offer better quality of life. Yes, hospitals are a business and not a pretty one. I wish you the best of luck. I know you will do great.
  12. Nei77

    New Grad - Should I take this public health job??

    I would take that community health job in a heartbeat. Nursing is not only Hospital nursing. You will get experience, you will get confidence. I am positive you will fall in love with it. I am currently working at a hospital looking desperately for a job like that. Enjoy it Good luck!!!!
  13. Nei77

    Flu Clinic Work

    PraiseGod22 Hi, I know this post is old but I was wondering if you every got to work with passport health? I applied with them. They pay really good. You can PM me if you want. Thank
  14. Nei77

    6 months experience, do I have a chance?

    I too have six months experience in hospital setting, I relocated, and yes I have had a lot of offers. So do your search and good luck to you!
  15. Nei77

    Patient Flow Madness

    You just described the last hospital I worked for, is it all hospitals????? Ugh!!!!
  16. Hi I get what you guys are feeling. Right now I am debating if to get a job 9-5 physician practice or go back to hospital just because of keeping skills. But for the sake of my health I really don't want to go back to the hospital setting. I agree with you Curious1alwys, BSN, RN PTSD is right!!!! I still have nightmares once in a while.