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JimmyDurham9

JimmyDurham9

Ambulatory Care, LTC, OB, CCU, Occ Hth
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JimmyDurham9 has 6 years experience and specializes in Ambulatory Care, LTC, OB, CCU, Occ Hth.

I started my professional life wanting to be a Clark Kent type at some major daily newspaper reporting on people and events affecting the world and winning Pulitzers. I wanted to travel the world and tell the story of what I encountered. I wanted to be in the front row of any major press conference for any major news story asking hard hitting questions for the public. I was certain I would be the thorn in the side of many a corrupt businessman/politician/dictator as I hounded them for the truth, something to which I felt the public had a right. But then I did a story on volunteer work in retirement homes. I met the residents, the volunteers, the CNAs, the nurses, and doctors, and I was awestruck. Seeing these awesome people connect with and care for the sick and elderly, and witnessing the difference it brought to them made me realize there was something bigger and greater than myself, and I could be a part of it. So, I went to nursing school. I use my writing and communication skills to spread the word about healthcare and empower people to take care of themselves. My awesome research and investigation skills, once used to sniff out stories like corruption in public offices, now assist me in locating information, organizations, people, tools, and more to help patients in maintaining optimal health. I am a Nurse Educator at a skilled nursing facility. I love teaching and helping nurses and ancillary team members be the best they can be. I have also worked in OB, critical care, occupational health, community health nursing, primary/urgent care, and diabetes education.

JimmyDurham9's Latest Activity

  1. JimmyDurham9

    Do women find male nurses attractive?

    Career is just one aspect of a person, and while it possesses a certain significance in choosing a person with whom to spend one's life, in the grand scheme the nature of your inquiry is centered on shallowness. At the end of the day, attraction is relative to person, circumstance, time, and God only knows what else. I'm not a woman so this may not be an opinion the OP is exactly looking for, but when it comes to relationships it all boils down to a basic concept: are they a good person or not? I'm most irritated by the fact most people buy into the illusion that gender and professional competence in nursing (and other professions) are so tightly linked. Reading comments that support men in nursing because they are super helpful when it comes to the physical aspects of the profession irritates me. That is also the case when people say things like "I can see men in maternity or post partum maybe being an issue" and "the guys I went to nursing school with even did well in maternity clinicals; if anything they were more embarrassed than anything else." Comments like that imply that men are sex crazed beasts incapable of controlling their libidinous impulses even as a human infant is making its way out of a vagina. True professionals focus on the tasks at hand thus rendering any commentary on gender, sex, and dating as they relate to nursing identity irrelevant
  2. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    I have more important things to do than carry this on. Everyone is entitled to their own brand of ignorance should they so elect. This is not a rationale, educated discussion of issues. It's devolved into petty arguing and pitting nurses who feel bullying is an issue against the nurses who deny it is an issue and participate in it. My main point is if you don't like something, change it; get involved. Otherwise you're just a bunch of bitter nurses sitting around and complaining.
  3. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    And I find your bringing gender into the equation equally offensive. My gender has no bearing here. So, pardon me if I find your sexist comments offensive.
  4. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    "Sometimes, the one who yells the loudest about issues is the cause of said issues." "So yes, bullying does happen. However, sometimes, the person who complains about bullying is actually the bully." That's where I got that from her post, which is why I was asking if I had what she was saying straight. I asked her to clarify what she meant.
  5. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    The ANA is fighting for nurses like you and like me; pretty much every nurse. Staffing ratios? We've taken it to legislators, we're fighting for you all. Improved educational programs? We're fighting for that and collaborating with leaders in the field to solve problems. No one is trying to manipulate anyone. If more nurses were involved, and actually collaborated to solve problems instead of just point them out, way more can be done. And at a risk of sounding snarky, jargon is part of nursing. You can only be manipulated by jargon if you opt for ignorance, and don't learn the terms necessary to perform your jobs. If you're not comfortable with understanding it, then please take a class or continuing education course to get comfortable with medical terminology.
  6. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    Let me get this straight; are you actually saying that the individuals who come forward with concerns about bullying are the problem? That follows the same logic that the victim of rape was "asking for it."
  7. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    Another problem with our profession and society in general is "head in the sand" mentality. Who needs evidence when you can arbitrarily cherry pick isolated incidences out of context and dig your heels in?
  8. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    I did leave those jobs. Not everyone is fortunate enough to just pack up and go like that though. I have no chip. I just despise nasty people who make it their mission to torment other people. I don't believe everyone in nursing is like that. My experience would leave me to believe otherwise, but that's not fair to nurses like you who are good and hard working. Not everything is black and white. And no one would should have to put up with abuse in their workplace simply because people say "suck it up" "don't like it, leave" when they should say "hey it's not okay to treat humans like that."
  9. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    I saw no disagreement; that poster had issue with my points and dismissed evidence I provided on the grounds of refusing to read "jargon." Further implying that the ANA was out to cook up whatever points it wanted as if it was some domineering organization seeking to manipulate people with "jargon" I merely pointed out the truth of the matter that nurses are invited and encouraged to participate in their profession and try to change what they don't like. Stop closing off to issues and information because of "jargon." It's easier to sit back, complain, and play the manipulated victim when you won't research the issues you comment on or participate in projects to correct the problems
  10. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    I don't doubt you. I'm just asking you to not dismiss this issue simply because you've gotten lucky.
  11. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    You're right. To me nursing is about serving our patients. The reason I exist is to serve my patients. In my opinion, from what I observe, nurses who aren't interested in service or looking for a big paycheck are more likely to be the nurses who miss things or bully their colleagues or get wrapped up in looking good. They are more likely to lose compassion, if they had any to begin with. They are more likely to be unhappy in their work. To me, nursing is not about money. I feel such sadness for my colleagues who dismiss the ideas of humility and service in nursing. If you want some evidence and empirical data, I can provide some that shows that nurses who are more selfishly driven or plain not nice are more likely to be sued by patients when they make small mistakes as humans are apt to do, particularly ones who just show up for a paycheck. I think nurse practice acts and professional scopes and standards as well as healthcare organizations policies and procedures might also agree with me on what nursing is. Nursing is service. Everyone of those documents state it and nurses who don't follow them find their licenses revoked
  12. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    I'm so sorry you experienced this. It's behavior like this that runs good nurses from the field. My first day in Labor and Delivery - I call the MD to report on his new admit. He hung up on me. I called back. He did it again. I called back because I needed orders, and he was impeding my patient's care. He hung up on me again, and called back to talk to the charge nurse who snatched my notes from me with a sneer, reported on the patient, got the orders and said to me "Here. Not that that was my job or anything." I asked what the doctor's problem was and was told he didn't like to talk to new people, and me in particular, he didn't like my face. I got asked about what kind of a "man would come work OB", when I worked in OR, I was scolded constantly, other nurses went into my ORs after I set up, and removed equipment, rearranged supplies, removed cables, and then the surgeon would proceed to cuss me for being incompetent. I tried to explain my position, and that made me look like I was whining and making excuses. Nurses intercepted lab results for my patients, and filed them away or hid them and never told me they arrived, so then I caught hell for not being telepathic or if I called the lab, they got ugly for having to send reports to me again. I was told by one facility that I couldn't work in their L&D department because I was a man. I was told to go work ER. Another facility hired me for pediatrics, and assigned me to ICU for which I had no experience or training. My first night I was given 4 ICU patients and I was the only nurse in the unit. The house supervisor told me to "quit complaining, act like a man or I'll have your license" when I raised the point of patient safety. She said I didn't need to be a nurse because I was telling her I wasn't competent to care for patients. I had a patient grab my crotch in a room where I was with her alone. I reported it to my boss and HR. My boss laughed at me and told me to grow up; it happens. If I didn't like it, then I needed to hire more "man nurses" so that patient would be distracted. Another job, my boss told me I got my job because she liked to have "man candy" around the office. That's the nursing world I've experienced.
  13. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    The reason we exist is to serve our patients. That is all. Stop making it about age. Nurses who entered the field looking for a big paycheck alone don't get what nursing is about. Nurses who want to feel smart and superior. Also missing the mark. To serve requires humility.
  14. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    Not at all. I am against individuals using their higher degrees as proof that they are better than others, and use them to make others feel inadequate. I think higher degrees and those with experience all have contributions to make. I wholeheartedly believe everyone of us should continue to seek higher education. I despise the higher degree mills that are pervasive among nursing now though. Someone who gets an online MSN comes in and suddenly disregards the value of experience. Many of those nurses end up looking foolish. Life is too slippery to cling to just books.
  15. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    Here's that research I promised. I encourage everyone of you demanding your evidence and studies do your own research and think for yourselves. Don't sit and criticize something because it doesn't have what you think it should have. Remember: this is a forum. If you're looking for material to influence your practice, then you need to reevaluate much in the way of your research approach. 2011 ANA Health and Safety survey regarding hazards in the RN workplace listed this as area of high concern: RNs threatened or verbally abused in 12-month period — 52% (57%) http://nursingworld.org/FunctionalMenuCategories/MediaResources/MediaBackgrounders/The-Nurse-Work-Environment-2011-Health-Safety-Survey.pdf From the American Psychiatric Nurses Association 2008 Position Paper: "health and safety consequences of horizontal violence (i.e., verbal, physical, and sexual abuse from coworkers) have received wide attention. A work environment with hostile interactions negatively impacts staff health and well being; furthermore, it has been associated with reduced quality of care and recruitment and retention problems." http://www.apna.org/files/public/APNA_Workplace_Violence_Position_Paper.pdf Hey the Joint Commission also has an opinion: "The Joint Commission states that intimidating and disruptive behaviors can foster medical errors, contribute to poor patient satisfaction and to preventable adverse outcomes, increase the cost of care, and cause qualified clinicians, administrators, and managers to seek new positions in more professional environments. Safety and quality of patient care is dependent on more professional environments. Safety and quality of patient care is requires teamwork, communication, and a collaborative work environment. To ensure quality and to promote a culture of safety, health care organizations must address the problem of behavior that threaten the performance of the health care team." (Joint Commission, 2008) Nurses are three times more likely to be the victims of violence than any other professional group (Keely, 2002) In Nursing Management's 2008 Workplace Violence Survey, 1,377 of 1,400 respondents claimed that employee safety in health care is woefully inadequate (Hader, 2008) Of the types of violence encountered, 51% to 75% were bullying, intimidation, and harassment Perpetrators of violence against respondents included patients (53.2%), colleagues (51.9%), physicians (49%), visitors (47%), and other health care workers (37.7%). Manderino and Berkey (1997) estimated that 90% of nurses experience verbal abuse on an annual basis. The Joint Commission surveyed nurses and found that more than 50% reported being subjected to verbal abuse (as cited in American Association of Critical Care Nurses, 2005, p. 16). Of the 303 nurses surveyed, 53% reported having been bullied at work (Vessey, Demarco, Gaffney, & Budin, in press). I suggest every nurse - especially the ones who have so graciously participated in this discussion either to contribute or demean it, read the ANA's position statement on Incivility and Bullying. Then read the ANA's Nursing Code of Ethics. As nurses we are all responsible for being familiar with nurse practice acts, professional guidelines and the scope and standards of professional practice as set forth by ANA. Those are the documents that courts will pay attention to should you find yourself on the ugly end of a lawsuit or criminal charge. Not your fancy higher degrees. Art and Shakespeare won't help you then
  16. JimmyDurham9

    Why Do Nurses Eat Their Own?

    Speak for yourself. I'll concede that I am not happy with the culture of resistance to life long learning that I see in nursing. It frustrates me to no end when I come upon a nurse who thinks they got the degree or diploma and that's it for their education, and then actively resist learning or changing. It's those attitudes that are at the heart of much strife between experienced nurses and newer nurses. I'm gonna tell you here and now, this superiority complex that is being flaunted in regard to credentials and degrees just illustrates ugly pride. It shares traits with the same lazy pride the nurses who reject life long learning posses. How can anyone possible learn from one another when they are all convinced they are smarter or "don't hafata learn"? All the fancy degrees in the world won't save you or your patients if you don't have the sense to critically think and work as a team.
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