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pebblebeach

pebblebeach

CNA, nursing student
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  1. pebblebeach

    Adjusting to NIGHT SHIFTS advice??

    Agreed. I have the positive attitude part down and I continue to work on good habits. I've definitely heard of instances where RNs bring in a doctor's note to get out of night shift after a v. short time on nights. In contrast ... my coworker with sickle cell? She could NOT adjust to nights. She was a fighter until the bitter end, though.
  2. pebblebeach

    Adjusting to NIGHT SHIFTS advice??

    It wasn't my intention to scare -- I'm sorry! I just wanted to be honest about my experience, as nights is not for everyone. I have had to find solutions to the nausea, mental health, etc. and as long as I am consistent, I know I will survive night shift until a spot opens up on days. I did forget to point out (as many have already) that the teamwork on nights really is great.
  3. pebblebeach

    Adjusting to NIGHT SHIFTS advice??

    Congrats on the gig! I started out in a new grad orientation program too, and we started out on nights. I have always been very sensitive to sleep, and my psychologist strongly advised me to not go on night shift, but it really wasn't a choice. So I went into it with a positive attitude and pretended I could be a night person. I've had a hard time. I do all the tricks -- blackout curtains, the original Dohm white noise machine (go big or go Dohm), essential oil diffuser, eyemask, etc. Sleeping between shifts isn't a huge issue now. In the beginning I would have so much adrenaline from shifts getting home that I couldn't turn my brain off -- give that a few weeks and I was tired enough to let that go, lol I've never been the sleepy type on the job, I'm the opposite -- engaged and high-alert (sometimes to a fault -- fine line between alert and anxious). The big problem for me is my days off. I've read all Googlable advice on this: Set an alarm if you nap - GET UP no matter what - and switch yourself back to a daytime schedule. (Or stay nocturnal all week - which I tried once and was so dreary I never did it again, but it may work for some) So, I finish the three shifts consecutive (I prefer that, btw - continuity with pt care and with report is wonderful) and the fourth day is the day to switch back. I will nap for a couple hours, wake up to the alarm and feel like the crankiest human on the planet & like I haven't rested at all, or I'll "listen to my body" (fine line there, again) and next thing I know it's dark (AM or PM? who knows!) I have several missed calls from concerned friends & fam, and I haven't hydrated in 16-18 hours. My mood may be lighter, but my body feels like it's been hit my a truck. I think only graveyard shifters who have experienced this crash can relate to that feeling. I've also never dealt with nausea before and have discovered I cannot eat on nights. (Coming from a big snacker who loves food, this sucks) So I will try to have a healthy meal when I get home or before work, and then bring a smoothie or something my stomach can handle during the shift. I've lost 14 lbs since starting night shift and not in a good way. I've added iron, Vitamin D supplements, and Miralax to my daily routine (don't even get me started on the change in BM habits... my GI tract doesn't know what the hell is going on) My mental health has taken a hit for sure. I have managed my depression pretty well for almost a decade now with a combination of therapy and SSRIs, but having that baseline history of depression added to chronic sleep debt (and sometimes forgetting to take my med because I was so strung out at first w/ what day/time it was) I have had... rough weeks. Two days particularly come to mind when I felt truly bottomed out. Waking up crying, feeling worthless, the whole lot. Thankfully I have been in that spot before, and even knew as it was happening -- "this is chemical, you're exhausted, this is temporary" Still lousy, though. All that said, I know this is not forever. Nights are not for me long-term. The pay is nice, but I'd rather get paid less and feel like a functioning human on my days off. One hack that has helped, I carpool with a coworker on our days that we are scheduled together, and we play goofy songs (Spice Girls, etc) on the drive and sing like fools, it helps my mood so much on those days coming into the shift. Or if I drive solo, I'll sing my heart out to Aretha Franklin or something equally over the top. Whatever works! Keep us posted how you're doing. Wanted to share from the perspective of someone who is on nights but not thriving, but I know I'll get through it.
  4. pebblebeach

    new nurse /gaslighting

    GREAT movie
  5. pebblebeach

    Nurses eating their young - a twist

    Of course it bugs me, I wouldn't have written all this out otherwise I just feel communication is so important & helps the patient in the end. I really appreciate nurses who communicate well & effectively & it always blows my mind (in any profession, not just nursing) when someone chooses cattiness or immaturity over simple communication. You're right though, I will continue to work on letting it go. Thanks!
  6. pebblebeach

    Nurses eating their young - a twist

    I'm a new grad nurse of 8 months and I wanted to share this as it goes against the cliche stereotype of veteran nurses eating their young. I wanted to thank all experienced nurses out there (the ones who remember paper charting ) who truly support new grad RNs. This is the experience I've had on my unit so far, and I see these women (and men!) as unofficial mentors, who I can come to with a problem and not feel afraid. What has truly surprised me is the bad behavior I've experienced from nurses younger than me. I'm in my 30s (second career nurse), and the examples I give below have all happened to me from 20-something nurses with a few years on the unit, who ended up as charge RN by default, lack of staffing on weekends, etc. This is how I've felt buoyed by the veteran nurses on my unit, and the opposite from a handful of younger "mean girl" nurses: Calmly bringing me to the side (note: not in front of the staff or patient, and not shouting or in a condescending tone) and pointing out a mistake I made with a pt. This is succinct and not a cat and mouse "do you know what you just did wrong in there?" ( <- This is literally how some parents speak to toddlers, fyi, not how colleagues should speak to each other!) It's also not a place of judgment, regardless of whether or not they are judging my mistake - i.e. "I'm not sure how you don't know this already," or "I thought this was pretty clear to you, but" It is something like: "Hey, Mary, Let's talk over here for a sec. In Mr Smith's room earlier, You didn't do the final MRN check against the patients chemo bag. I checked it, and it was fine, but we always do it three times - at delivery, outside the room, and inside the room before we initiate the med. It's super important because X." Note that there is no hand-holding, no congratulating me on "You did great on this, but ___" I'm not asking for a hug. I'm only asking for respect. Obviously an exception to this is if I'm about to do something immediately compromising to the patient's care, we're in a code, etc. Learning, for me, does not come from a place of fear or shame or guilt-tripping. When a teaching opportunity comes along, and it begins with shaming (doing it in front of others), eye-rolling, or fear ("if you did that and I wasn't in there, the patient could be in the ICU right now") - I will likely not remember the clinical lesson later. All I will remember is the way you made me feel, and I'll start to dread working with you, avoid asking you questions -- which therefore becomes a potential barrier to patient care if you're the only one around. If you're so concerned about the mistake I made and you want to protect the patient, wouldn't you want the new nurse to learn from the mistake without feeling like she's just been verbally attacked? I've had these girls yell at me in front of the patient, refuse to come into a room when I call to ask them for bedside help because "you won't learn anything if I hold your hand", gossip about me / other new grads within earshot, eyeroll when I ask a question and one would "quiz" me on what I just did wrong. If I didn't guess correctly, she said she would wait until I realized it so we could talk about it. How do I know what I don't know yet?! Initially these moments felt like a tidal wave and I took it personally, now, I only approach the nurses who speak to me with respect - and so far, that has been the older nurses. So, I just wanted to say thank you to those of you that know who you are. Does anyone else have "mean girls" on their unit, perhaps maybe born in the '90s....?! (not to generalize or anything ) It took me so off-guard, feels very high school and they tend to stick together at work (much like high school) I finally told one of them I didn't appreciate her attitude (outside of the patient's room! calmly! what a concept!) and she told me "if I'm going to make it as a nurse I need to stop being so sensitive." LOL To quote Ellen, be kind to one another folks. (And yes, my use of "women" and "girls" here was an intentional wording choice)
  7. pebblebeach

    New Grad RN: Neuro ICU vs BMT residency

    Thanks, Kareegansee! I will definitely keep my options open, and plan to keep in touch with the Neuro ICU director (we're only a couple floors apart at the facility). I see you're in the SICU, is that where you started out as a nurse?
  8. pebblebeach

    New Grad in Onco/Heme/BMT Unit.

    I'm about to start a BMT residency and this post was super, super helpful, especially the patient education resources. Thank you! edit: oops, that was supposed to be a reply to buckeye nurse RN
  9. pebblebeach

    New Grad RN: Neuro ICU vs BMT residency

    Yes :) It was super helpful for me to type it all out on here, and I did end up going with the BMT offer. Thank you!
  10. Hello everyone! I am a newly minted BSN interviewing for my first job as an RN. I had two interviews this week for a 1-year graduate nurse residency program. (The residency program provides extra education, about 5 months of orientation, and several hands-on in-services and training sessions, etc. - still salaried/full-time, just newbie status) I had one interview on a Bone Marrow/Stem Cell Transplant unit. Patient population mostly leukemias, multiple myeloma, aplastic anemia, etc. I am interested in oncology from both a personal perspective (cancer in family) and nursing-learning perspective - I think the research happening with stem cell transplant biology is super exciting and this facility is doing some really cutting edge procedures with their patients. 36 beds, pt ratio is typically 4:1. Incredibly impressed with the unit (they just poured tons of money into it, and it shows) especially the focus on family integration and comfort for longer LOS. Another interview with Neuro ICU. Equally impressed with facility and family focus. Equally excited by research and technology available to this unit. Patient ratio is 2:1, sometimes even 1:1. 40 beds. Got offers for both units. Same facility, same pay and benefits. I did not have access to the ICU in nursing school, only 1 day of shadowing at clinical. I did, however, float often to an oncology floor as a CNA and loved it. The BMT unit said I will likely be working nights, the Neuro unit said I will likely be working days. However, I am willing to work both. Also, I was super impressed at the longevity of the nurses on the BMT unit. Most I talked to had been there over 10 years. Got the impression at Neuro ICU, most nurses were young, and are using the job as a springboard for another opportunity later (CRNA school, etc.) On BMT I also enjoyed that the staff celebrated "birthdays" (first day of transplant) by putting balloons on the patient's door - they emphasized that they are like a family on the unit. I liked that. I am super excited about both of these and know neither choice will be a mistake, but I was hoping some nurses with experience in either specialty can offer some perspective to a new grad nurse deciding between the two. There are these nursing grads who are very "I'm going to be critical care/peds/etc. nurse ALWAYS and I LOVE IT" and I'm like, you haven't even started yet?! I know what interests me, I know I have curiosity for both areas, and I know I am willing to work hard and learn as much as possible. I guess - I don't feel I have earned the experience to say I will ONLY work in a certain area, because who knows what I will thrive in? My long-term plans are possibly NP, but no interest as of now in CRNA or anything further. My strengths (from my mere CNA and nursing school experience) are therapeutic communication and I tend to be extremely thorough, my weaknesses are perhaps needing to prioritize which tasks I am thorough with - there isn't time to be thorough with everything (or anything, some days), I also have been working on handling criticism since I left the womb (getting better every day!) :) Any tips would be appreciated, and I'm so honored and pumped to join this wonderful community of nurses!
  11. pebblebeach

    Nurse Corps Scholarship 2017-2018

    Hi all, just a $0.02 here - I am a Nurse Corps scholarship recipient which helped cover the bulk of a 2017-18 1 year accelerated nursing program. I am incredibly grateful & honestly did not think I would get it. I just wanted to add that if you are not the most financially savvy with taxes, loans, etc. - you may have a steep learning curve after receiving the scholarship. Again, EXTREMELY grateful, but I've had a difficult time coordinating between Nurse Corps and my school's financial aid. A lot of times it feels like there is miscommunication and I am responsible for making sure there's no gaps. I don't find the portal incredibly helpful -- the messaging system is such that you ask a question, someone gives a bare bones answer, and then "closes" the conversation, so you have to start a new topic over again to respond to the same question. The search tool is kind of a nightmare and is often outdated, so you have to individually check each site to make sure it is still compliant with HPSA scores. For about 20-30 potential sites, this can get frustrating. There's just a lot of individual case by case scenarios with this scholarship and you have to sometimes be very annoying and persistent with phone calls and questions to get things straightened out. This was a new hat to wear for me, as I hate having to "bother" people, but I've gotten pretty aggressive over the past few months with getting to the bottom of things. It just gets... complicated before things are simplified, and you might get some surprise requirements along the way that you didn't expect. That's my 2 cents. (SUPER GRATEFUL I KNOW KNOW!) Good luck to all
  12. pebblebeach

    Could I be let go because of my ADHD?

    LOVE your signature/quote btw - so true. A blessing and a curse to feel everything so intensely. That is terrible that your diagnosis was used against you. Makes me so angry. With ADHD, I feel like I will always disclose because I take the lowest dose possible of Adderall, and if it shows up on a drug test I feel like that could put me in jeopardy. All the yellow tape with stimulants these days, I don't want to mess around. With my depression/anxiety though, I guess there is no reason they HAVE to know about it... but ugh, why can't we be transparent if it's a medical diagnosis we are successfully managing!? And if there was an emergency, like an asthmatic who may need albuterol in an emergency, there might be a 911 day when I need help or need to take a day off to get myself together - how is that any different? Stigma is the worst. Can I ask if you don't mind, was it an issue of a medication you disclosed you were on that your supervisor didn't trust? Or the diagnosis itself? I am a newbie/almost done student nurse and this makes me nervous for future jobs. "You'll probably have to work twice as hard as a neurotypical to be considered successful."
  13. pebblebeach

    Could I be let go because of my ADHD?

    There's no way that would disqualify you. If that was the case re: ADD/ADHD and everyone answered truthfully, a lot of healthcare workers wouldn't have jobs! :) I have intermittent depression and ADHD and I take meds for both. I always disclose that info with job/school applications to cover my butt (if something were to come up on a random drug test). You should be fine.
  14. pebblebeach

    Drexel University ACE Program 2016-2017 - Review

    Yes, the cost is super high and definitely a big stressor. To anyone reading that is considering Drexel or starting at Drexel - apply to ANY/ALL nursing scholarships that you can find. Even if you don't think you won't get it or you think your GPA isn't high enough. You'll never know when a small scholarship may help you out with a grand here or there. Every little bit counts. I applied to a ton of random scholarships first quarter and it was such a pain to do all those essays in the middle of classes, but I ultimately received one and it was completely worth the effort.
  15. pebblebeach

    Drexel University ACE Program 2016-2017 - Review

    I am in my third quarter of the Drexel ACE program and I agree with all of the above :) (except that CNAs think they are the s**t... I was a CNA and other than being a little more confident in a bed bath, I don't think I'm better than anyone else, haha, in some ways I think I'd have been better off without the experience - it got me set in my ways!) Good luck to all starting the program! Stick to what the poster says above and you'll do great!
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