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EmeryRN

EmeryRN

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EmeryRN's Latest Activity

  1. EmeryRN

    De-accessing a port woes?

    I have that anxiety even if I have a really good day, thinking I must have missed or forgotten something and that's why I thought I went smoothly haha. I remember scanning it but that's about it. All a blur bc it was at shift change and I was multitasking. Arg! It's frustrating and the not knowing is annoying. But thanks all for the support.
  2. EmeryRN

    De-accessing a port woes?

    Guys, I am stressing myself over something I can't do anything about and pretty much due to a nagging feeling. I'm hard on myself and this could be in my head, maybe which is why I am lying in bed awake at almost 4a. To the point, I discharged a patient at change of shift last night, deaccessed his port, which was the first time I've ever done that (been an RN for almost 3 yrs). I spoke to my charge and we went over the steps. I ordered the heparin flush per our protocol. I remember flushing with NS first and I know I pulled the heparin flush from the Pyxis and documented on it, but for the life of me I have been agonizing, thinking I may have missed the heparin when I deaccessed the port. During my dc education, I let them know to continue getting the port flushed monthly yadda yadda. But I can't shake this feeling. Could be in my head but that's no comfort. And I can't do anything now about it if I did forget it. I don't even know why I'm posting but any advice/encouragement would be helpful. And needless to say I will DEFINITELY make sure I heparinize next time. Side note: I just precepted someone last week and let them know you are still constantly learning in this field and you will never know everything. Boy, is that the truth or what!
  3. EmeryRN

    Looking for tips for a stressed new nurse.

    Bedside nursing can be difficult! I didn't think I'd last 6 mos on my floor when I started but I'll be there 3 yrs in a few months. ALWAYS ASK FOR HELP! Even if it's advice. I STILL do. You will get your flow down, with prioritizing and time management. It takes time. I felt like I was drowning most shifts when I started. And I used to cry before and after most shifts because I was so stressed. I basically pushed through and things are better. I still think I probably should try somewhere or something else in nursing, which is a reason why this career is awesome, so many paths. Keep at it. You'll find your niche.
  4. EmeryRN

    This can't be safe at all

    I agree, if NICU is your heart, follow it. I'd talk to the director/manager at rehab but you should definitely take the job. My first job was a tele/renal floor, hired me fresh out of nursing school, and orientation was 3 months long typically for new grads. After a couple of years, picked up a second job at a rehab hospital, and though they warned me the patients are still pretty acute, I accepted bc that's what I'm used to anyway. Well! Patients were certainly more acute than I would expect for REHAB but what bothered me most was there weren't resources to deal with them like a hospital has. I felt very unsafe and ended up quitting pretty much before I started on the floor by myself. I even talked to the nursing manager and voiced my concerns but she basically told me to pray on it. Oi. Make sure you and your patients are safe and even better since you have another job lined up!
  5. EmeryRN

    if you graduated in the last 5 years

    I applied to multiple places right after passing the NCLEX but I ended up getting a job right away that i precepted on during my last few months of nursing school. Getting to know the nursing staff and having them recommend me helped. But so did the fact that the floor was short staffed haha.
  6. EmeryRN

    Unobserved fall and I feel awful!

    Thank you, Karou. Sounds like a very difficult time experience with the pt, as well and the LTC. I go back tomorrow and I feel better about facing my pt and another day at work.
  7. EmeryRN

    Unobserved fall and I feel awful!

    And this may need to be another thread, but mechanical dvt prophylactics are a fall risk. Even if a pt is AO. I've heard mixed reviews of whether AT pumps, for example, are effective and worth the fall risk.
  8. EmeryRN

    Unobserved fall and I feel awful!

    I hope they are both ok. But that does make me feel better. My little old lady was to have an Ortho consult to determine if surgery is needed. The attending consulted one while one of her other MDs changed to another. So no Ortho consult today! Frustrating! But vitals are good and she is sleeping tonight. And yes, thankfully if she had to fall, it wasn't home and we were able to take action quickly.
  9. EmeryRN

    Unobserved fall and I feel awful!

    Thank you. And I know my reaction is way over the top. It isn't productive or practical but I have always been hard in myself like that. Maybe I will find some help with that sometime per your suggestion. Again, thank you all for your input. I do appreciate your time.
  10. EmeryRN

    Unobserved fall and I feel awful!

    It is a comfort to know I'm not alone. I'm trying to breathe easy but I'm still having trouble. Thanks all. This is helping me blame myself a little bit less.
  11. EmeryRN

    Unobserved fall and I feel awful!

    SoldierNurse22: Thank you. But I can't shake it. It's not my first fall, sad to say. But I round and make sure the call bell is in place, bed alarm, etc, and still falls happen. And I ALWAYS blame myself. Even though my Charge RN and other nurses say I've done everything I should. But it doesn't matter. I still think something could have been different. And when I have a fall, I feel like I'm having too many and I'm a bad nurse. It's so early in my career and I'm afraid of losing my license and not being to handle things.
  12. EmeryRN

    Unobserved fall and I feel awful!

    I am a nurse of 2 yrs. and yesterday around shift change my little elderly lady was found on the floor. I had round on her about 1800ish and she was laying in bed with her book, didn't need anything. She had been ambulating with a walker to and from the bathroom by herself AND changing her own brief. Not only that, but she would ambulate the halls, often unassisted (however on my shift, I'd always walk with her). She couldn't help herself up and I knew instantly a hip fx, which later a xray confirmed. The call bell was in reach, she had her footies on. According to her she was sitting on the edge of her bed, which she does during meals, went to reach for something and lost balance. She had already been seen by PT and like I said, ambulating. Ortho has been consulted to decide surgery or no. I feel completely sick over this. She is AO and so sweet. I don't know why I'm posting. I don't know what else to do but I've already cried and now I'm back to doubting if nursing is for me. And I am to start a 2nd job PRN soon! I can't move forward. I'm scared for my patient and for myself. I can't even blame it on ratios because I had discharges before that. I need a time machine... And maybe a Xanax.
  13. EmeryRN

    Are you good at charting in "real time?"

    We still work based on priority but have to factor in giving meds on time. I work nights so my patients need to sleep and I need to do my chart checks and try and make calls before it's late. And more procedures are done during dayshift, so the patient may be gone part of the room. And if they need to be prepped for something, all takes time (and prioritizing). But on top of that, you have bed alarms, an incontinent patient to clean, family, etc. I do agree with you that those who do it more, rank it higher, and I wish I had time, but it's difficult. And not to start anything with the ED staff, but I always have some sort of mess to clean when I receive patients from the ED, but that's more likely my particular facility.
  14. EmeryRN

    ADN/BSN Quandaries

    I can't speak for ADN because I did BSN, but the I feel the differences in the courses are mostly due to nursing theory and evidence based practice. My BSN has helped me provide great patient care. But I learned the most from clinicals and experience on the floor. I guess BSN is more encompassing because of theory and such, and my program required hours spent in the community and doing some projects. But we still learned about critical care, ob/peds, adult health, etc and were graded on our nursing skills, critical thinking, and assessments.
  15. EmeryRN

    Are you good at charting in "real time?"

    My floor has been pushing for real time charting, and if I has a few pts, I sometimes do. But by the time I make my rounds and answer questions from the pts, fam, MDs, I need to do meds. Especially if I get vitals that need to be addressed right away. I work overnights and ppl want to sleep and I want to spend time w all of my patients and find out if I need to call for new orders before it gets late. And also if there's a more critical situation to deal with, that obviously takes priority. I try to document SOMETHING but I usually have most documentation to do later on. I'd like to document real time. I did before we switched over to a different system. But now I always care my report sheets and at least write things down
  16. EmeryRN

    ADN/BSN Quandaries

    My hospital is phasing out ADNs and hiring BSNs. There are a few ADNs hired on my floor but you sign a contract saying you will earn a BSN in 2 years. I live in FL. And I just went straight for a BSN, but worked with ADNs getting BSN. Some have done it. I couldn't imagine working as an RN, w 3 shifts/week and working overnights like I do now, on top of nursing school. But ppl have. It's what you can handle and it sounds like you are a hard worker!