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1Tulip

1Tulip

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1Tulip's Latest Activity

  1. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    I think this is Fire Arms 101 when you take your class for your permit. Don't ask, don't tell. I've been reading debates at Allnurses.com about whether assaulting a nurse should be a different level of crime, whether nurses are somehow "special" cases. No. Make your prosecution aggressive and you sentencing severe no matter who the victim is. BUT nurses ARE special targets. My very good friend who is a very savvy, very experienced forensic psychologist says that nurses are one of several images that swim around in the heads of sexual predators.
  2. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    Our hospital has 800 beds. A new section was built and is slowly being moved into. So figure there are maybe 500 active beds. Between ICU and the other units, maybe there are 4 patients per nurse. (Probably closer to 3:1, but the math is easier with 4:1) So, at 1900 hours there are 100 nurses leaving and (because night shift nurses carry more patients on the non-ICU units) maybe slightly fewer nurses arriving. Throw in a lot of 12 hour non-nurse employees and you have a big flow of potential victims walking around in the dark.
  3. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    I went to the crime statistics. There have been two thefts on streets adjacent to the hospital, almost on the campus, in the last 6 weeks.
  4. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    Cool!
  5. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    Anything like that would be helpful. Maybe I can get the suppliers to come by and give us some demonstrations and/or answer questions.
  6. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    Yes I agree. The thugs know when the victims are going to be there. That gives them an advantage. The thug knows we're mostly female. Finally, the image of nurses has been sexualized, especially in pornography. That's why I mentioned Suzies XXX Adult Video Superstore just down the street. Want to know something that is funny (in a sick way.) The parking lot at Suzies is lit up like a bright day at high noon. Our parking lot... not so much.
  7. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    Presumably, our danger is diminished once inside the hospital. (I am not so sure, since there is no attempt to screen people in the halls and all entrances to the place are wide open except at night, when they are locked, but not guarded.) A pistol can be put in a locker with a heavy duty lock in place. The other way to keep a gun safe is to NOT talk about it EVER. Does anyone remember the Nursing Home massacres in North Carolina? Disgruntled ex-husband walks in with a pistol and starts executing helpless old people and one nurse that tried to stop him. If anyone were to do that in our place it would be like the terrorist attack at Mumbai. It could go on and on and on until a swat team arrived. How many people can you shoot in the 10 to 15 minutes it would take police to respond?
  8. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    Bless you. I know that concealed carry is a hot potato on this website and many others. My question to those who object to exercising their 2nd amendment freedom is simply... given this situation in which my fellow employees and I find ourselves, what are the effective and immediate alternatives?
  9. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    I didn't put this on my original post. But the administrator and "Safety" officer simultaneously had convulsions when a nurse asked about concealed carry permits. After they recovered, they informed us that the campus is strictly a "gun free zone" and anyone violating it would be summarily fired. ("Gun free zone", AKA "Kill zone"... the place where thugs know they have nothing to fear.) I have also found out that at least 6 doctors that I KNOW about carry. I have no idea how many are armed that I don't know about. For nurses who want to survive coming and going to work, and who have made the decision to legally carry a pistol, it is strictly "don't ask, don't tell."
  10. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    We are SEIU. So far they have been incredibly uninterested. Some nurses who believe in and work with the union may try to get them to notice the problem. We'll see. But mostly, lights are not part of our contract.
  11. 1Tulip

    Criminal Assault due to "criminal neglect"?

    We are trying to work on a team approach for going to our cars. This does not work as well upon arrival which is also (at this time of year) in the dark. So... it is more than likely we will at some point be walking alone in the dark to work. Our unit is fortunate in that we are on the first floor of the hospital, at the butt end of an old wing. There is some parking there that is not used too much and we may be able to get away with parking illegally for a while. There is a limit to how much we can get away with because our citations will be turned over to human resources and we will be warned, then "counseled" then let go. 1-2-3 strikes we're out. We are being "watched" if we fail to register our vehicles by a specific date in March. Once registered, the parking Nazi's will be on the lookout for our cars. Most of us have registered cars we don't intend to drive to work anyway. As far as quitting and working elsewhere... there is only one other hospital in town, and they aren't hiring very many nurses right now. (The economy here is above 12% unemployment, so few people are letting go of jobs regardless of how poorly they're treated.) Pepper spray is certainly an option. The use of pepper spray is tricky depending upon the wind. If you're assailant has the wind at his back, you'll be hit by as much spray or more than he will. I'll tell you what. I have had one knee replaced in October. Another one next month. There is no way I'm going to be nimble enough to run 10 feet or even struggle much if attacked. It makes you feel very vulnerable.
  12. The place where I work is instituting a new parking policy. To get to the lot where we are to park, we have to exit the rear of the hospital, go past a row of big dumpsters, past a lot full of vans and fleet vehicles, cross a main down-town street, enter a huge and poorly lit lot that is about a quarter of a mile down the street from Suzi's XXX Adult Video Superstore. We know the lot is not safe because cars that are parked there are frequently broken into. During the meeting at which the new policy was introduced, nurses asked about safety. Here is what the "safety" officer told us. 1) Yes, cars are broken into. No, we can't do anything about it. 20,000 car break-ins occur each year in our city. The police cruise the lot when they can. It's your responsibility to keep back-packs, purses, GPS units, etc. out of sight. 2) No, we cannot light the lot any brighter than it currently is because that would cost too much money. 3) No, we cannot have the lot on camera in real-time but only the scanning system we have now that is not continuously monitored. To do better monitoring would cost too much money. 4) No, we won't have a shuttle to take you to and from your cars except in very bad weather. To provide shuttles would cost too much money. 5) Yes! We will provide you an escort to your car. However, after hours we have only 5-6 officers for the whole 800 bed campus so you will have to wait. And while you're waiting, make sure you're clocked out. In addition, there was a nurse who outran an attacker within the last month. Also, we're the major trauma center and have all the gang-bangers in our ER. We have no guards in the ER. We have no metal detectors. (It would cost too much money.) We had a deranged man shoot himself in the parking lot on the other side of the hospital last year. I tried to do some quick research on attempted assaults on nurses, but only found articles related to work-place violence, a related concept, but not what I was looking for. It is my suspicion that it is not uncommon for nurses to be attacked going to and from hospitals at shift change but that it is not reported as such. For the police, it's an assault and would be recorded that way. For the hospital, there is every reason to sweep such incidents under the rug. Does anyone have any anecdotal stories relative to assaults on nurses or know of any research on the topic? I am thinking about contacting our police and getting crime statistics for our area of the city, if they will give them to me. Any other ideas out there?
  13. 1Tulip

    Rising Above It All.....

    Look... #1) Life is short... too short to hate your work. #2) Some units s*ck because they have snarky, back-biting, catty, clique-y people working there. #3) I have worked on those types of units, and on great units with fabulous team spirit. #4) I'm the same person. I didn't make the bad places bad, I can't take credit for making the good ones good. So... Set your own standards for how you expect to be treated. If you're being abused some place, leave. (Most good hospitals will keep track of new staff members and when they request a transfer w/in a short period of time, they will do some follow-up. You can't make a bad unit bad by staying there and being a martyr. You might make it better by seeking a better place for yourself.) And... The reason there are snarky, back-biting, catty, clique-y places, is because the leadership is poor. Fish rot from the head down.
  14. It is so unfair and unjust. If they happen to ask you something and you say "I don't know"... in our hospital, you can pack your bag and leave. BUT THAT's NOT ALL!!! They are going to go into our patient's rooms and ask them... Did your nurse introduce herself to you this morning? What did the nurse do before she gave you your medications? Did she ask you what your birthday is? Did she look at your wrist band? Now folks... I work on a neuro unit and my back surgery patients are on heavy pain meds, and my stroke/dementia patients have no short term memory! And they are going to look around the room for any infraction. Can't have extra linen in the room. Water pitcher must be labeled with patient's room and bed number Water pitcher has to have iced water in it (or at least cool water.) IV bags have to be labeled with the time they were hung, and all the tubing has to have date stickers. Better hope your patient hasn't just p'sd and put his urinal on his bedside table. They will blame US if the MD's didn't sign, date and TIME the restraint orders. (That's HUGE with them.) How realistic is this?
  15. The problem with our current set up down here is that the government doesn't go to the trouble of determining the standards and enforcing them. They contract out their responsibility to this agency that has to prove they matter by finding "dangerous deficiencies" here and there. If the government was involved it could be argued that voters would get the chance to "veto" them by agitating and lobbying congress. (This is only theoretical, you understand.) I think our system is sort of bastardized, if you will. The government regulates and interferes, but can keep an arms length away from being responsible for the consequences.
  16. They are unelected, unaccountable, almost unlimited in what they can decide to require. I spoke with a well-known expert on clinical research. They contracted her to advise them on evidence based practice. She quit in disgust after a short time because their interest in evidence was only superficial. They wanted to do what they wanted to do whether they had data for it or not.