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RschIVF40

RschIVF40

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RschIVF40's Latest Activity

  1. RschIVF40

    I feel uncomfortable doing this

    I agree with icumaggieRN and Meriwhen. Also, if you end up writing a recommendation letter for nursing school for this relative, they may then expect assistance regarding another recommendation letter when they graduate and start looking for their first job as well. I am in total agreement that you suggest that this relative utilize recommendations from their instructors or employers, as these individuals would be able to better assess this relative's traits and/or working style than yourself since you barely know her. Best Wishes!
  2. RschIVF40

    I'm so afraid that I violated Hipaa!

    Sorry to get in on this conversation at the last minute. I would move forward from that situation and not get overly stressed about it, but rather utilize it as a learning situation and just NOT repeat doing this sort of thing. In the future, I would be very cognizant regarding not sharing information about patients with family members even if it is "general terms the nature of the injury" as well as the "gender" of any patient with family members or friends or even other patients. Although we all have difficult, challenging or unusual situations that arise at work, it may be best to just discuss how you handled your day, or various situations (i.e. I was able to effectively resolve an extremely emotionally challenging situation today), as opposed to discussing any information regarding the patient. I agree with "onedayitllbeme" regarding reviewing HIPAA as we all need support. Best Wishes
  3. RschIVF40

    Conduct your own research from scratch?

    Although I'm getting in on the tail-end of this convo, I've done rsch at work as well as am doing it for my PhD. You mentioned you have no research background. Conducting a research study requires quite a bit of work and can be very time-consuming and specific protocols must be followed as per the IRB. Thus, it may be more challenging to get funding from the NIH without previous research experience. That being said, perhaps if your clinic partners with another clinic (or MD office) with research experience, you could then move forward with conducting the research. Better to learn from those who have actually done research before to assure that the study goes off without a hitch especially when patients are involved. Research can be very rewarding. Best Wishes!
  4. RschIVF40

    Male locks (hair)

    I agree with RunBabyRN, and the other comments regarding that fact that it may depend on your geographic location. In my experience, I've seen individuals with dreads at the MA, LVN, RN level, including management, as well as PA's & MD's. I have not heard that anyone was told to get rid of them as long as your dreads are kept clean, neat and pulled back (as required of any other long hairstyle during working hours, so as not to interfere with one's work). The main focus is attendance, skills, experience, personality, service excellence and quality.
  5. I agree with what the other RN's have said regarding: 1) checking what the patient had previously and how they reacted to it; 2) giving the med that is the weakest / lasts longest, & 3) keeping the benzo/narc close by in the event it is required. I'd also check back with the attending MD to apprise him/her regarding the patient's BP & shortness of breath & continued request for pain meds. I'd also make sure to document everything ( i.e. following up with the attending MD or HBS MD, as well as your concerns) in the event that the patient has a negative outcome. You didn't mention the patient's diagnosis, so it is not clear what they are suffering from, nor did you mention how long they had been on all these pain meds. Some patients experiencing long-term chronic pain, are in fact actually just anxious and depressed due to the chronic pain and thus, may be more hypersensitive to pain. They may just "feel" as if they need more pain meds, when in fact, they do not. Taking that many pain meds over a long period of time can affect the pain receptors in their brain. Chronic pain is difficult to treat, especially if the patient is weak. Caution is essential if the patient has a low BP along with breathing issues in order to prevent over-sedation, etc. Good Luck
  6. RschIVF40

    Nurse Decision-Making Study in IVF/REI/Wm's Hlth

    Hi all...Just a note, this survey has been extended through TUESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2014. Thank you to all who may have already taken this survey. For those who have not...... The survey focuses on gathering feedback from clinicians & clinical staff including: NURSES, psychologists and other clinical staff who work or have worked in the field of IVF (In Vitro Fertilization), Fertility (REI) or Women's Health, and who have worked with patients undergoing IVF cycles regarding decision-making around embryos and embryo disposition decisions. Please see research survey invitation for survey link.. Thank you again for your time!
  7. RschIVF40

    Want to move into clinic

    You might try applying for temp / volunteer work in family or internal medicine as a way to transition into this field...just a thought Best Wishes
  8. RschIVF40

    Am I cut out for this????

    I agree with RN403 and anh06005..I would also see about finding, perhaps, a senior RN and ask to "buddy up" / partner with that RN to get some additional on-the-job tips that this RN has learned throughout the years. Review that RN's charting may help you see what charting deficiencies you may be missing... Also, depending on where you work, some places (i.e. larger hospitals), often have RN educators as well for the RN staff. If your clinic / hospital has an RN educator on staff, you may ask to meet with that individual for some additional one-on-one coaching.. Best Wishes!
  9. RschIVF40

    Business Plan in Nursing

    The government has a website that helps entrepreneurs develop small businesses. If you go to the US small business administration, they have a "tool" to help you create a business plan, in addition to a number of resources. (click on the left hand-side on the 2nd link to access additional resources for creating the business plan, (i.e. executive summary, market plan, strategic planning, etc.). I've attached their links are below. Please note, this is generic to all businesses, not specifically to nursing business plans....fyi Hope this helps! Create a Business Plan | The U.S. Small Business Administration | SBA.gov How to Write a Business Plan | The U.S. Small Business Administration | SBA.gov
  10. RschIVF40

    Nurse Decision-Making Study in IVF/REI/Wm's Hlth

    Hi all...Just a note, this survey has been extended through SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2014. Thank you to all who may have already taken this survey. For those who have not...... The survey focuses on gathering feedback from clinicians & clinical staff including: NURSES, psychologists and other clinical staff who work or have worked in the field of IVF (In Vitro Fertilization), Fertility (REI) or Women's Health, and who have worked with patients undergoing IVF cycles regarding decision-making around embryos and embryo disposition decisions. Please see research survey invitation for survey link.. Thank you again for your time!
  11. RschIVF40

    Research Nursing

    You might try volunteering for an entry-level research position as a way to get experience in the field at a hospital research dept or at a company that conducts clinical research trials, or try looking for a temp part-time entry-level research position, as a way to gain experience in the field.
  12. RschIVF40

    Esme Needs Your Prayers and Well Wishes

    Saying lots of prayers for a speedy recovery. Best Wishes!
  13. RschIVF40

    Upset/impatient patients

    I agree that it is challenging asking patients so many questions. At the front desk, when the patient is registering, they are just asked, "Any changes to your current address or phone number?"...our patients are fine with this. Specific to medication reconciliation and/or other questions, I start off with letting the patient know from the get go, that I need to ask them a number of questions that they may have been asked in the past, but in order to provide high quality care, I just need to confirm these again for the MD. I also let them know that I will get through these quickly as possible. I too, use humor to defuse the situation as well, especially when I can tell a patient is starting to get upset because of the questions.
  14. I agree with roser13, that Ebola does not seem to be as much of a "stigma" as HIV/AIDS was "back in the day", mainly because it doesn't seem to be transmitted by sex, although my understanding is that Ebola can be found in semen (and other body fluids) once the person's symptoms appear. I'm not sure what protocol that Texas hospital utilized to care for the Ebola patient as well as remove their personal protective gear following caring for that first Ebola patient. It also isn't clear whether they wore full "bunny suit" protective wear, like the healthcare workers utilized in caring for the Ebola patients in Africa, or whether they only wore gowns, gloves and masks. I would agree that certainly, by not wearing eye protection, shoe covers, and a surgical cap, when caring for these patients could potentially lead to Ebola transmission if the caregiver was inadvertently splashed by the patient's body fluids if the caregiver had an open cut. I would also hope that the hospital followed the CDC protocols as they stated in caring for the patient as well.
  15. RschIVF40

    Spervisor hid meds

    I agree with what others have posted regarding this issue. And, not to berate you regarding the "forgetting to lock the med room", but that is a major issue, however, this certainly doesn't excuse your supervisor's behavior. That individual should have had better sense than to do what she did. Supervisors and Managers are supposed to "lead by example", not participate in making the situation even worse. Very, very poor decision-making on her part. I am not exactly sure where you work, but if you are in a hospital then you should have a compliance department and should be able to contact that department anonymously, to submit a complaint against your supervisor for her behavior, along with submitting an incident report regarding the incident. Most hospitals I've worked at have also had a "no-retaliation" policy as well, meaning that once the situation is investigated, the supervisor is not allowed to retaliate against the employee for turning that supervisor in, for example, by giving that individual a bad performance evaluation or by making things difficult for that employee. Best Wishes
  16. I can understand your frustration. As you do have your nursing schooling background, some general ideas that come to mind include: pharmaceutical sales (if you like sales and people), health "coaching" for individuals, like in a gym or health spa around lifestyle changes. Or, taking more classes in business / management, or getting a nursing home administrator certification may then allow you to move over into a healthcare management / administrator role. Best wishes!