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BillEDRN

BillEDRN

ED, critical care, flight nursing, legal
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BillEDRN specializes in ED, critical care, flight nursing, legal.

BillEDRN's Latest Activity

  1. BillEDRN

    What in the world does the ANA do?

    Wow. I certainly didn't mean to offend you or any opinions you may have on the reasons folks join churches or religious organizations. That being said, I didn't mean to imply that it (joining a church for some political representation) doesn't ever happen. Certainly it has in the past and will likely do so in the future. If I was in any way unclear on my opinion on the matter let me clarify: Most folks join churces or participate in religious activities based on their spirtual needs not their political or collective, professional needs. As for active member of any church versus the non-active ones, my opinion would be similar: if those non-active ones were unhappy about what "their" church was doing, they too would have a choice. Get involved to change things or leave that church and find one that better suits your needs. Sitting back and complaining without getting involved is non-productive and rarely results in any meaningful changes. And finally, just to be perfectly clear: I was not attempting to speak for "everyone." I do not believe I made that claim explicitedly or implicitedly. I was, as most here do, merely conveying my opinion based on my experience. You, of course, are free to disagree. You are also free to sit back and see how things work out instead of becoming involved in changing things....
  2. BillEDRN

    What in the world does the ANA do?

    I would have to disagree with your analogy, both of them. Paying dues, especially union dues in a "closed shop" where you have no choice, in like paying taxes. And again, that is the problem. People all too often (and nurses are a prime example) happy to pay their $20.00 (or whatever amount) a year and then sit back and not participate in the process of running the organization. I saw this time and time again in our nurse's union. As for comparing ANA or some similar organization to a church, well, I just think you are off base on that one. One does not join a church because they want some type of professional or collective representation. And, they usually join a church based on their current beliefs and need for spiritual guidence. As for not being willing to change a representive organization, if it's doing a good job and you agree with the direction and administraion of your money, then fine. But folks join organizations like ANA because they want to be associated with the professional organization for a variety of reasons. And, again that's fine, if things are going the way you want. What I was referring to are nurses, members of ANA, complaining that the organization doesn't represent them and then, instead of doing something (either getting involved in changing it or getting out of the organization) about it, just sit around and whine. The hope that more working nurses would join if they better represented them is a catch 22 situation: How can those who are not "working nurses" know what the "working nurses" want when there are no "working nurses" around to tell them? The "just sit back and see how things work out" attitude is why nurses are in this position to begin with.
  3. BillEDRN

    What in the world does the ANA do?

    Since I coined the term on my post, I define "working nurse" as a bedside nurse as opposed to an administrator with an RN after their name. As to feeling "...being vocal should be enough...." well, that is the problem. It's sort of like complaining about politicians but not voting. Being "vocal" is never enough and has proven time and time again to accomplish nothing of significance. You make an interesting observation in that after your shift you'd be too tired to pick up the phone, implying (at least to me..) that also includes actively participating in any collective activity that might better the working conditions for nurses in the future, which, ironically enough would likely create a working environment in which you wouldn't be so tired after a "normal" shift " that you wouldn't pick up a phone." As to having just more nurses join, well, that would indeed increase the clout of the organization (any organization) but that was not the point. I was addressing those that claim ANA (or, again, any represenative organization) didn't "represent them." It is not your money that conveys your personal hopes and ambitions for an organization that you hope to represent you. It is your active participation in the organization itself. You must convey your feelings to the other active members and convince them of the utility of your views for the good of the profession. Sitting at home and writing the occasional check won't influence anything. SO, if you want the organization to be more responsive to the needs of bedside nurses, more bedside nurses will need to participate in the process decision making for the organization as a whole.
  4. BillEDRN

    Thousands of RNs Planning 2-Day Strike

    What dire circumstances can you be alluding to? Since when has a competent nurse with experience have no other choice except to choose to work as a scab? One of the contentions many have about these agencies and the scabs that work there is that one of the reasons they aren't working "regular" jobs (either as a traveling nurse or in their hometowns) is because of prior employment problems or incompetence. While I applaude your decision to not cross a picket line, it does not detract from the fact that those that do essestially undermind the efforts of other (IMHO more ethical) nurses who feel that they have not other recourse than striking. The fact that those who work as scabs undermine these efforts soley for financial gain is deplorable and should not be tolerated by the nursing profession.
  5. BillEDRN

    The Great Double Standard?

    I don't know about the state of nursing care in the UK, except to say that lots of your nurses are coming here to practice and not many US nurses are flocking to the UK. So, take that observation for what it's worth. However, to answer your question, my grandparents are deceased, but my elderly mother recently was diagnosed with breast CA and had to undergo multiple procedures and ultimately surgery. At one point, she had to have a male tech administer dye for for a radiology study. The dye was injected into her breast to map migration to her lymph nodes. Initially, she was hesitant to have this performed by a male. So, I talked to her about this concern. After a short time, she realized her fears were unfounded and that a male could be as caring, gentle (considering the procedure), empathetic, professional and competent as a female. Moreover, she made the realization that placing limitations on someone for reasons of sex is rarely, if ever justified. Just as she hoped that no such limitations would be arbitraily placed on her daughter's professional endeavours because of her gender, none should be placed on someone else's son. So, my response to irrational and unfounded fear/concern/modesty is one of education and logic. I know this may run counter to the current drivel espoused by many of the nurse educators, but I for one prefer to educate people as opposed to perpetuate unhealthy stereotypes, discrimination and fear.
  6. BillEDRN

    The Great Double Standard?

    I wouldn't "force" care on anyone at anytime...however, I have told patients that I was the only nurse available to do the procedure so they could decide to have me do it or not. I find it interesting that you tried to accomodate a black person's request for a black nurse. If the situation was reversed, a white person asked their assigned black nurse for another, white nurse, would that be OK?
  7. BillEDRN

    This is all a matter of priorities

    A link to another discussion on this same remark from Mr. Bush.... https://allnurses.com/forums/f112/gwb-just-go-er-246601.html
  8. BillEDRN

    What do ER Nurses look for in a PCT?

    As a former ER tech and ER nurse, I agree with the above....good luck
  9. Now, if we could just get nurses to collaborate and use the same energy directed at TV commercials to force changes related to other things...like safe staffing, lift teams, patient safety, getting rid of nursing diagnoses and care plans.....
  10. BillEDRN

    Thousands of RNs Planning 2-Day Strike

    Thank you. While you are certainly free to disagree with my characterization of these strike busters (which is from both personal experience and research into the various agencies that employ them) your statement that "we all need to make a living somehow" to somehow justifiy these individual's behavior is discouraging and, in my opinion, wrong. Would you extend the same level of tolerance to those that steal, threaten the safety of others, place pay over professional responsibility or hamper efforts to improve society if they weren't nurses/scabs? Some things should not be condoned and until we nurses, as a group, stand up and collectively rally against the negative impact these scabs cause on efforts to correct what our profession seems to universally recognize as detriments to our practice, (poor staffing, high injury rates, poor working conditions, etc.) the more difficult it will be to induce the healthcare industry to make substantive changes. To quote Edmund Burke "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." There is no excuse for one group of nurses to thwart the efforts of other nurses to improve working conditions and patient safety, especially if the only motivating factor is their own financial reward! That, in my humble opinon, is the definition of cowardly and money-grubbing low life.
  11. BillEDRN

    Thousands of RNs Planning 2-Day Strike

    Having been thru an extensive strike in which the hospitals brought in strike busting nurses, I can tell you that their motives (the strike buster's) are not about patient safety. It is about the money, and ironically, the working conditions afforded them while they are busy collecting wages far in excess of what the striking nurses would have earned. While out on strike, the facility provided the strike busters with transportation to the hospital, lodging, meals while at work, had a "coffee cart" go around to the floors 24 hours a day, bought pizza for those working on a routine basis, and increased the staffing ratios to make sure that they weren't overworked. If you note the sentiment the poster made about the way they were treated by management, you will see that the facilities treat the strike busters much better than the "regular staff." Funny that it's OK for the facility to make sure the working conditions (staffing, meal breaks and food availability, roaming coffee cart) are improved for the "hired guns" but cannot do this type of stuff for their regular employees. However, more importantly, is the fact that many of these "hired guns" do not have the needed skills to handle the patients assigned to them...although facilities are not going to release the info, there are many reports, including those from the strike I participated in, of sub-standard care and basic mistakes. These nurses who are willing to cross picket lines are nothing more than cowardly, money grubbing low lifes who have little to no moral compass, and use the "patient safety" argument as a justification for their self-serving practices. Which, in the long run benefit only themselves, the staffing agencies, and the healthcare industry, and only hamper the real efforts by the courageous nurses who are willing to strike (and incur the financial hardships associated with it) to improve patient safety. If patient safety were really an issue, why aren't these strike busters working in their hometowns, leading efforts to improve patient safety? Is it that many are from southern, right-to-work states where the working conditions are dismal and the pay is low for RNs? To the striking nurses...good luck. I wish you the best. May your efforts and sacrifices lead to the improvements we all know are needed.
  12. BillEDRN

    Thousands of RNs Planning 2-Day Strike

    Actually a limited duration strike may work better than extended ones...the reason being is that on extended strikes (and remember, by law the union must provide a 10 day notice of strike to allow the facility to prepare...) the facility can hire strike busters for the duration. If nurses only strike for two days, then the facility has a harder time hiring the scum, I mean stike busters, as their contracts are usually for periods of time longer than 1-2 days. The strategy was used with some success during earlier strikes in California.
  13. BillEDRN

    The Great Double Standard?

    "I dont think I am missing the point." I hate to berate the point, but I think you are. The discussion was about why this form of discrimination is tolerated when other forms are so vehemently renounced. "I see this a different choice from saying you dont want a nurse because he/she is orange/green/has 3 arms etc. And I am only talking about personal care (ok double standard on my part in dividing care up!)." So you recognize that you are inconsistent in you arguments and that you do(or so it appears, as I assume you would have the same problems with a realistic class that may be subject to discrimination, such as blacks) have a problem with other forms of discrimination. "Patients who see me in my role as nurse practitioner have chosen to see me..." I am not sure what type of system you work for, but for many patients, and the nurses that care for them, such options are not always available or practical. Assuming you were the only nurse available, and a patient requested a male because of an STD, would you let him wander out into the healthcare maze and let him try to find a male to treat him? Or would you try to convince him that his health, as well as others he might have (or had) contact with, was in jeopardy and that as a professional you would treat him with the same understanding, dignity, and compassion as a male counter-part? "I would not support discrimination on any other grounds.." So at least you recognize it as discrimination, which only validates that we have a reasonable basis to question why this type of discrimination is OK, when others are not.
  14. BillEDRN

    The Great Double Standard?

    While you are entitled to your personal opinions and biases, you are incorrect about your discrimination. It does not matter an iota if your response is an "emotional" one or not...it is still discrimination. If a patient requested a white nurse 'even though they recognized that a black nurse was just as qualified' because it was an "emotional" issue for them, would you then say it wasn't discrimination? Of course not! And while I appreciate your discomfort, let's call it what it is. Like all forms of discrimination, the best way to address it is with open and honest discussions, not attempts to bury the true nature of it under the guise of a different name.
  15. BillEDRN

    The Great Double Standard?

    Karen, It seems you miss the point of the discussion regarding what is "acceptable" discrimination and what isn't. Why is it that female nurses are not so accepting if someone says they don't want a female nurse (i.e. a male patient asking for a male because of some problem "down there" - I know I have personally heard female nurses tell such a patient to "get over it...I've seen it all before") but want to make it a cultural issue if a female patient doesn't want a male nurse? Sure, we should accomodate a patient's requests if possible, but I do not think we need to perpetuate outdated stereotypes. As a student, I was excluded from most aspects of my OB/GYN rotation, but have delivered several babies. I was also told by my instructor that "men shouldn't be in nursing" so there is some legitimate concern that such regressive thinking needs to be addressed. Oh, and by the way, I have, on several occasions, had patients ask for a different nurse or a doctor based on race or ethnicity. We didn't accomodate those requests, and I am not sure we need to do so for gender either.
  16. BillEDRN

    What in the world does the ANA do?

    CNA/NNOC have a history of raiding other unions. They did it in Hawaii and Mass. They have in the past (in my personal experience in Hawaii) lied to gain entrance to meetings, tried to represent themselves as members of the Hawaii Nurses' Association (HNA) in order to vote at a House of Delegates, paid prior CNA board members to infiltrate (HNA), they illegally masterminded a takeover of the HNA - it should be noted that was the determination of Federal District Judge Gilmore, who ordered CNA to immediately vacate HNA's premises, and many other instances of either illegal, unethical or questionable activities in trying to reach their goals. There was also an NLRB hearing in California that found CNA had illegally harassds and threatened nurses who were opposing their efforts to organize their facilities. Instead of focusing their energies on organizing those markets that are not unionized, they try to take over another union. And, it wouldn't be so bad if they came in announced that they thought they would represent the nurses better and up front tried to convince nurses to change unions, but instead, they resort to the methods above. This, in my opinion, reduces their credability, and forces nurses to pick an apparently more ethical organization or one that may be able to make better contracts but suffers from a lack of moral conscious. As I said, these actions could tarnish the reputation of nurses who are perceived as holding high moral and ethical positions. Besides that, some of the articles below (which were found in a very quick search of the net, the list is certainly not exhaustive) point out that CNA has it's detractors and may have concerns over how it spends it's, or should I say it's member's money. Again, all I am saying is that both ANA and CNA/NNOC have their own issues, and as organizations, it will be their members, thru their actions or inactions, that will shape both the direction and operations of those organizations. IMHO, if you choose CNA/NNOC as your organization, you will need to ensure that such practices as noted above are curtailed. If you (hypothetically speaking of course) choose ANA, you will have to ensure that the needs of the bedside nurse are made a priority and wrest control from the educators and management-types. Either way, it will be a difficult job, and you will need to get buy-in and participation from other nurses. Good luck. http://www.camajorityreport.com/index.php?module=articles&func=display&aid=2263&ptid=9 http://www.camajorityreport.com/index.php?module=articles&func=display&aid=2250&ptid=9 http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archives?p_product=SB&p_theme=sb&p_action=search&p_maxdocs=200&p_topdoc=1&p_text_direct-0=10A2B0D958A9C8DB&p_field_direct-0=document_id&p_perpage=10&p_sort=YMD_date:D&s_trackval=GooglePM http://www.accessmylibrary.com/premium/0286/0286-12597355.html http://starbulletin.com/2003/11/01/business/story1.html