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motoluver

motoluver

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motoluver's Latest Activity

  1. motoluver

    The term physician

    Thanks for your input from the perspective of an MD. I see how my comment between an NP and GP is possible disrespectful but I want to add one point and see what you think. Hopefully you see this and respond. The training you have gone through is obviosly way more extensive then any NP program. If NPs in some states are trained and given the authority to basically fill the "clinical practice" role of a GP then that should leave two answers, NPs are not qualified to be filling this role independently or MDs/DOs are over qualified... What do you think? Again no hard feelings I'm not trying to offend anyone at all and I appreciate your response to the thread! My belief is that MDs/DOs are over qualified GPs which is why you have the training that allows you to go a little further and become a cardiologist or surgeon, etc. Don't get me wrong the education you go through is impressive and I don't want to offend, belittle or be disrespectful. If my take im this is wrong then on the other side of the coin I would assume NPs then should not be filling the GPs clinical practice role "independently"... Again thanks for your input. I don't call myself a physician, doctor, doc, etc to any patients I have treated but just wanted to see what people thought mainly on the term physician since the medical dictionary's definition of that word covers what NPs do... I agree with many of the above comments about confusion to patients and I also believe that all patients should know exactly what credentials are held especially when there is that large educational difference because patients should never be misled regarding your qualifications. Thanks!
  2. motoluver

    The term physician

    Well said. I like your take on this! Thanks for sharing.
  3. motoluver

    The term physician

    There are different degrees of training between MDs even... A GP isn't qualified to be a surgeon... An NP is qualified to do what a GP does... That is my thought process on this. I was just curious how others think about this so thank you for sharing your views!
  4. motoluver

    The term physician

    Lol thanks for pointing that out!
  5. motoluver

    The term physician

    Lol thanks for your input. I just went to edit my profile since I haven't been on here in years and thought I was checking the boxes of education and training for those who wanted to look at my profile. I had no idea that was showing as my title lol. Yes that does look crazy. Title is important if its been earned. But title doesn't make you any better then any one other profession. Everyone is trained to be a professional in their field and level of training. Thanks for sharing! PS now that you pointed that out I will update my profile to show just my current title lol
  6. motoluver

    The term physician

    In my state NPs are granted virtually the same peivliges as a GP depending of course on the NPs national certification. That being said, if an NP worked on cars as the profession and wanted to be lumped in with MDs, DOs as a physician then I would agree that is silly. The actual definition of physician exactly describes the practice of an NP. Prevously when the DO came about, MDs were unhappy with them being included in their recognition as doctor or physician but through time and due to the fact that they do the same thing it has now become acceptable for a DO to be Dr or physician and both MD and DO programs take a different approach to treating medicine as does the approach with NPs. Granted NPs don't have the extent of training of the other two but that is why you won't see an NP surgeon... Prior to even MDs their were still physicians. A physician is an individual trained to practice medicine and this is exactly what NPs do. I do believe that patients will get confused because NPs practicing independently is relatively new and thus I feel providers should be clear with each and every patient that they are indeed a nurse practitioner and then outside of making that clear, I think an NP meets the full definition of the term physician... Aside from an NP meeting the definition of a physician does not mean that term will ever stick to NPs which is why I appreciate your feedback. It is good to understand everyone's feelings on this. Thanks!
  7. motoluver

    The term physician

    Yes I agree. With the advancement of health care to include many types of providers that have authority to diagnose, treat, and prescribe medicines and treatments indeoendently, I feel that all types of providers need to be clear as to their credentials with each patient. Thanks for your input!
  8. motoluver

    The term physician

    One thing that bothers me is the term "physician". I hear nurse pratitioners referred to as non-physician providers or mid-level providers. Granted NPs don't have the level of education as an MD/DO but the care they have been trained to provide legally is just as high quality. Mid level sounds inferior to who would be considered a high level provider... If an NP was providing medical treatment outside of his/her scope illegally then yes I would consider that mid-level because they aren't trained to provide that care. First I don't think anyone should ever try to hide their credentials (NP, PA, MD, DO, etc). Patients have the right to always know the level of education of the provider that is treating them. With that said, it bothers me to read " non-physician" providers. The actual definition of the word physician is an individual that practices medicine. In WA State as an NP I can legally practice medicine under my own license without supervision... Many other states are the same. And in states requiring supervision it should be considered supervision by a medical doctor, etc, not supervision by a physician... The term physician does not belong to MDs or DOs exclusively. Don't get me wrong EVERY patient should not be miss led about your credentials but if I see a patient and state "I'm a nurse practitioner and will be the physician treating you", etc that should be acceptable... The argument about who can be called doctor, and physician I feel is rediculous. The only importance I see is the fact that every provider clearly states his credentials to every patient. After that if I have a DNP I should be free to be called doctor or physician and as an MSN-NP, called a physician. The term pbysician and doctor were around well before the creation of medical school so to think they have the only right to that term is preposterous... I do understand the goal of not miss leading patients but if credentials are offered to every patient, beyond that I feel the term doctor to those educated appropriately or physician to anyone who practices medicine and healing is free game to all no matter your credentials. Am I off on my thinking of this? Would love to hear your thoughts on this. Any MDs or DOs want to offer their personal feelings on this? Not trying to start an argument but would love to hear how others feel on this topic of who has the right to the term doctor or physician. (I know there are other threads on the term "doctor" but can't find anything on the term physician. That is why I started a new thread) Thanks!
  9. motoluver

    online rn to bsn chamberlain college

    Hey, So I am graduating here in less then 4 weeks from Chamberlain RN-BSN program. I needed 45 credits to graduate from their program. I did their program in basically 2 semesters but had to get special approval from the dean of admissions to take an accelerated schedule. The nice thing with doing it this way is it saves you money. 45 credits @ $546/credit is almost $25000 but they have a ceiling of ~$6500 per semester which is equal to 12 credits. I was taking sometimes 10 or more credits per session and with 2 sessions per semester I was almost getting a 50% reduction in tuition cost! Ok as far as classes to pair up on, I just used my advisers judgement "Holly Overby" and she did great. I worked an average of half time while taking this accelerated schedule and I'm graduating with a 3.9GPA. I did a fair amount of studying but it wasn't nearly as bad as the associate nursing degree I took. I would have had a 4.0 but I had an issue with one of the general classes from DeVry which is my only complaint. I would have rated the program 10/10 but after that incident I would rate them 8-9/10. Oh you should know I'm single with no kids. For those who want to know, I had just under 96% in my statistics class up to the final test and some how failed the final with a D-.... I am an A student so I didn't understand how you could do that good and then fail that miserably. And I wasn't the only classmate that had that happen. It would seem that at 96% you would be prepared for the final not to mention I redid every lab assignment from the whole quarter in my 10+ hours of studying in the 2 days prior to the final. So I don't understand how I could have failed that bad. I submitted a claim to have it looked into but they said they reviewed the test and it was legit.... so that was my only negative remark. Other wise I'm very happy. Now onto a masters program : )
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