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Olivia.

Olivia. BSN, RN

NICU
New New Nurse
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Olivia. is a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU.

Olivia.'s Latest Activity

  1. Hi Olivia,

    I noticed you replied to my post on Neonatal Nurse Questionnaire. My teacher wanted me get your contact info, so she could speak with you. Please email me: umundozai@gmail.com . Or, if possible please email my teacher: pcrowhurst@musd.net . Also, thank you so much for your help, it's deeply appreciated.

  2. Olivia.

    Neonatal Nurse Questionnaire!!

    What do you think the top 3 qualities that a Neonatal Nurse must have? Patience, intelligence, and compassion for tiny humans What do you enjoy the most about being a Neonatal Nurse? Seeing humans so close to God’s creation—before the world has affected them. Their innocence. Being a nicu nurse has made me grow in so many ways such as my patience, selflessness, and acceptance. The least? Difficult assignments—and maintaining compassion and critical thinking even when it’s tough and you are tired and frustrated and have a baby’s screaming in your face while eating, while your other baby next door is literally fighting for their life. What is the typical salary of a Neonatal Nurse? I make $28.80/hr and I’ve been a nicu nurse for almost 2 yrs What hours/shift do you work? Three 12 hr shifts per week. I am 70% nights and 30% days so I rotate every few weeks.  What are your daily responsibilities and duties? The life of the baby and their scared parents. Closely monitoring a baby on echo clinging to their lives; patiently holding an agitated baby’s endotracheal tube with one hand, and their hand with your other hand, while you wait for their versed bolus to kick in. Feeding a baby who has never eaten ever and gently guiding them to suck the bottle and not just play around. Seeing your primary grow from a sickly 0.6kg preemie, to a robust and healthy infant. Why did you choose Neonatal Nursing? For the challenge of the ICU environment; and for the personal enjoyment of babies and their cuteness What advice would you give to someone considering this nursing career? Study’s and pray to see if this path is right for you. It’s a beautiful, cool job...but it’s also exhausting some days and will test you. Good luck :)
  3. Olivia.

    New Grad NICU Support Thread

    Hi everyone, how's it going? I started in October 2017 in a level 4 NICU as a new-grad! It's definitely been challenging, but I can't imagine myself working anywhere else!
  4. Olivia.

    New Grad NICU Support Thread

    Hey! I work in a level 4 as well--I started in October. I'd say study the policy & procedures on your NICU 1st & foremost (bc that's what you are legally responsible for). Then study common diseases in your NICU. Usually they are RDS, IVH, PDA, VSD, PFO, ROP, NEC, thermoreg., Developmental care, etc. (can't think of anything else atm). Assessments is also really important--i.e., noticing increased WOB & what it looks like, what to do for it/what's causing it (for example, if baby was just weaned from ETT to Biphasic and has increased WOB, maybe they aren't tolerating it & a blood gas needs to be done early. Or if they haven't been weaned, maybe they have secretions that just need suctioned out!) Good books are 'Merenstein & Garners Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care'; the 'Core Curriculum for Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing' (by Verklan & walden), this site General | Newborn Nursery | Stanford Medicine for assessments head-to toe; and for review Qs, 'Certification and Core Review for Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses' (by Watson). I know this response is a little late but hopefully it's helpful!! From one NICU nurse to another :)
  5. Olivia.

    New Grad NICU Support Thread

    Hey! I work in a level 4 as well--I started in October. I'd say study the policy & procedures on your NICU 1st & foremost (bc that's what you are legally responsible for). Then study common diseases in your NICU. Usually they are RDS, IVH, PDA, VSD, PFO, ROP, NEC, thermoreg., Developmental care, etc. (can't think of anything else atm). Assessments is also really important--i.e., noticing increased WOB & what it looks like, what to do for it/what's causing it (for example, if baby was just weaned from ETT to Biphasic and has increased WOB, maybe they aren't tolerating it & a blood gas needs to be done early. Or if they haven't been weaned, maybe they have secretions that just need suctioned out!) Good books are 'Merenstein & Garners Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care'; the 'Core Curriculum for Neonatal Intensive Care Nursing' (by Verklan & walden), this site General | Newborn Nursery | Stanford Medicine for assessments head-to toe; and for review Qs, 'Certification and Core Review for Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses' (by Watson). I know this response is a little late but hopefully it's helpful!! From one NICU nurse to another :)
  6. Olivia.

    New Grad NICU Support Thread

    I don't think so, just subscribe to &/or participate in the thread!
  7. Olivia.

    I can't believe it!

    that's fantastic!!!:) Definitely go through the NCLEX, especially if this will be your first time in clinicals (some schools start clinicals freshman yr; some junior year after you get into the BSN program) The NCLEX is so helpful with talking you through different situations.
  8. Olivia.

    Nursing & Spanish

    I am in the saaaame situation as inthespotlight. I completely agree with all the other posters who said knowing spanish will make you more marketable--especially if it is in your minor. There are always going to be latinos, especially if you live in somewhere like TX or CA or ILL. I wonder if it makes a difference whether you are ALREADY fluent in spanish to begin with; or if you actually get a minor in spanish. Anyone know?
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