ServantLeader

ServantLeader

Administrator inspired by nurses

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ServantLeader has 25 years experience and specializes in Administrator inspired by nurses.

- Retired hospital administrator (CEO & COO). - In 2009 named, along with administrative team, Top Leadership Team in Healthcare for Mid-sized Hospitals by HealthLeaders Media for implementing servant leader (bottom, up) cultural change at 90-bed regional hospital. - Author of the hospital novel "Medical Necessity".

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  1. Your experience is the manifestation of the difference between command-and-control leaders and servant leaders. Unfortunately, servant leadership is the exception, rather than the rule. A pity, as my experience is that servant leadership is the easie...
  2. Buyer Beware - I have never been happier at work in a hospital as when I was successful being a Servant Leader. Every metric that matters to hospital boards got better - often world-class. I loved getting up and going to work in the morning and so d...
  3. Great point HouTX. I agree that administrators don't think about nursing licenses. This is why it's always a good idea to ask the frontline people who do the work for a solution to a problem. This, as opposed, to administration coming up with the ans...
  4. Thank you for this clarification Asystole, it was remiss of me to mention the disagreement around the health benefits. Your point about positioning is also well taken. This is what happens when leaders do not know how to create an inspired workplace...
  5. At a healthcare conference earlier this year where I was reporting for a client, I met a few of the senior managers at Allina Health from Minneapolis. They were nice folks and were realizing some cutting-edge technology accomplishments. So, when they...
  6. Hi Sally - I understand your frustration. I worked as a senior manager for a large for-profit hospital for nine years and the CEO (my mentor) was very sensitive to treating the staff with respect and appreciation. I worked in a large not-for-profit w...
  7. Here' what I learned working most of my career in hospitals: There is never money to correct a safety issue until something bad happens. Then money can't be spent fast enough.
  8. Ha - very smart counter strategy - well done.
  9. I have occasionally come across clinicians who provided lousy or even negligent care and this is truly shocking. The main character in my novel "Medical Necessity" is such a person. However, most medical errors I investigated as an administrator were...
  10. And administrators wonder why when charts get pulled during a regulatory inspection (JC, state) or a there is noncompliance. Or they wonder why medical errors (meds, testing, etc). Inadequate floor staffing is stepping over dollars to save dimes.
  11. Well said - it's the staffing, stupid. From my own experience, I have found that balance between what administrators want to control labor costs (the biggest expense in hospitals) and what nurses feel they need to work safely and sanely, is possible....
  12. Or unionization. I worked with unions in two hospitals, including a nurses union, and we got along fine. Staff turn to union and lawsuits when they feel they have no other options. It's a shame for both sides, because when leadership creates a grea...
  13. Oh yes, it is illegal. But I have seen cases were doing something illegal was not enough to motivate executives to make changes - they had to get caught, first (this is not widespread, but I have seen it first hand). I had such circumstances brough...
  14. When I started as a hospital administrator in 2000, an older guy explained to me about how hospitals were becoming more complex to management: "You know, it used to be in the old days you counted the money in the morning, played golf with the doctors...
  15. All of your feedback: lack of nursing input; poor work processes (including info overload); inadequate pay, etc all come down to poor workplace culture. As many of you know, I've talked about this topic in other posts. If hospital administrators want...