Jump to content
Sockeye

Sockeye

New New
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 10

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 945

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

Sockeye's Latest Activity

  1. Sockeye

    BP Cuff Readings vs. Arterial BP

    Sometimes you have to flush rather aggressively (or vigorously, as they like to call it in formal policies). There is no harm in that.
  2. Sockeye

    BP Cuff Readings vs. Arterial BP

    Really? Why not? Not the last three I worked in. Flushin CVLs has always been part of the capping policies. And for artlines, Edwards Lifesience makes a product called Vamp. Precisely for reflashing the sample discard back into the vessel. The Vamp or similar products are in use all around the world. So again, why not to flush the lines?
  3. Sockeye

    BP Cuff Readings vs. Arterial BP

    I go by artline. Giving the artline a couple of aggressive flushes using 2-5 cc syringe would take care of a possible fibrin clot. The last thing that you want is picking/choosing the pressure that you like most. You want to go by non invasive and you have a reason for it - fine; but then stick to it until you resolve your lines or health crisis.
  4. Sockeye

    ventilator settings

    What is IPPV in Bennet languge? SIMV?
  5. Sockeye

    ICU nursing Australia vs The US

    Is there a way to answer private mesages? The board won't let me write to the people writing to me. Pls send your normal email with your message.
  6. Sockeye

    Adelaide Jobs

    The NP system and approach in Oz is very different than in US. There very few NPs in Australia at this time. Correct me, but I think we are talking a couple of hundreds for the entire country. I don't think anyone would seriously be interested in hiring a brand new NP from overseas with less then 3 years work experience which is not even in the area of expertise. Sorry.
  7. Sockeye

    ICU nursing Australia vs The US

    In most of the decent units those things are protocol driven. The docs prescribe a protocol. It would be up to the nursing staff to implement it based on the specific requirements of patient under care. So lets say for blood sugar control the docs would give you Insulin drip order with the request to optimize the BSLs within 4-10 range. They would not be generally interested in how you achieve that as long as Insulin requirements were not dramatic (>15 units/h). In Calgary we had protocols for management of traumatic brain injuries where nurses could initiate fluid boluses, start Noradrenalin, bolus hypertonic saline when they see fit in order to achieve certain clinical goals (CVP, CPP, ICP, etc). Ventilation wise, we would be talking about an order to wean off ventilator. This is Brisbane now. It would be up to nursing staff to decide to ease up sedation to a level of tube tolerance, go down on FiO2/ PS/PEEP based on the gas exchange, transition from lets say SIMV to PS ventilation - generally bringing the patient to the point of extubation. And then, upon a medical review, receive an order for extubation and implement it. In contrast, Toowoomba hospital ICU would not let nurses make any changes to the ventilators at all. So again, everything seems to be very unit specific. Unfortunately, someone who used to a certain level of independence in practice would have a major culture shock borderlining depression when they come to a place where their expertise, experience, knowledge and skill set is not generally needed, and they are unable to practice to the full scope of their abilities, capabilities and desire.
  8. You'd be making about $30/hour. Also, night and weekend premiums are quite high. There are jobs for nurses. Both part and full time. Google Queensland Health Work for Us website. Email your resume to the PCMs (NUMs in Oz language) and see what they have to offer.
  9. Sockeye

    ICU nursing Australia vs The US

    Interesting read. I am ICU RN from Canada now working in one of the largest Brisbane intensive care units. Pretty much everything said earlier is correct. I do however get an impression that North American nursing is somewhat superior (in terms of professional independence, philosophy and respect) to the Australian which generally follows the UK model of nursing. This is much very dependent upon each and every unit traditions and history. There are places where nurses treated as professional members of the same team, and there are places where you are looked at as a form of advanced domestic help of some sort. This is sad and hurts, but I guess if you don't have much to compare things with then you don't really know what you are missing.