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Amberf

Amberf

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  1. Amberf

    Nursing or Medical School

    I agree with what RNkitty had to say about lifestyle choice rather than monetary choice. Like others here, I too started out as pre-med when I made a return to school. I completed the first 2 years of a BS in microbiology, thinking I was well on my way to becoming a doctor....then I started working at a teaching hospital. I'm now spending the next year completing my nursing pre-reqs, hehe. As an intern or resident: a nationwide law went into effect not long ago that limits the hours that they can work to 80 per week. However, finding hospitals that adhere to that policy may be another issue...some still push residents to over 100 hours/week. As staff, it just depends on what type of facility you work in, what specialty, etc. I've seen anywhere from 60-well over 100 hrs/week put in (almost all of them had families at home). As an RN, again I would think that it depends on your specialty, and what type of facility you work in, what type of company (staff vs. travel, etc). The nurses on my unit (L&D) put in anywhere from 36-50 hrs/wk, more toward the higher end if they have to stay after a busy shift to finish up charting, etc. I'm sure the nurses here can add more to that. :) I made the decision that having a life away from work and a lot of family time was more important to me personally. I also enjoyed the closer patient contact you have as an RN vs. a MD. And as mentioned above, the required course of study is very, very different (Med schools are pretty uniform in their pre-reqs: Any 4-yr degree with completion of 1 yr each of organic and inorganic chem, general biology, physics, english, and Calc 1.). However...if you find that having your MD is something you feel you truly want to do, by all means, don't let the difficult course sway you. Med schools will tell you up front they have students that enter well into their 30's and 40's after a career change, it just depends on what course of action you feel you would get the most satisfaction from. Because at the end of the day I think the most important thing is to be happy with who and where you are. :)
  2. Amberf

    Anyone heard of O-chem as a prereq?

    Let me clarify...I didn't mean "harder" in regards to how difficult o-chem is vs. general chem is, but the level of difficulty of "o-chem for the science major" vs. "chemistry with an organic component" for the non-science major. :) I actually liked both my gen. chem and o-chem sequences, I thought they were very interesting classes. And Marilynmom is correct, don't let a class intimidate you. Study smart and keeping envisioning the end goal of nursing school graduation!
  3. Amberf

    Anyone heard of O-chem as a prereq?

    Let me clarify...I didn't mean "harder" in regards to how difficult o-chem is vs. general chem is, but the level of difficulty of "o-chem for the science major" vs. "chemistry with an organic component" for the non-science major. :) I actually liked both my gen. chem and o-chem sequences, I thought they were very interesting classes. And Marilynmom is correct, don't let a class intimidate you. Study smart and keeping envisioning the end goal of nursing school graduation!
  4. Amberf

    Anyone heard of O-chem as a prereq?

    Check with your school as to what they mean by "o-chem." Here in Hawaii they have a course for the science major, which would be the harder organic chemisty class (prereq for that would be 1 full year of general chem for the science major.). For the nursing student, however, they specify the requirement as "chemisty with an organic component," which is very different from the course mentioned above. The prereq for this class would be "Elemental survey of chemistry" for the non-hard science major. Hope this helps. :) Amber
  5. Amberf

    Anyone heard of O-chem as a prereq?

    Check with your school as to what they mean by "o-chem." Here in Hawaii they have a course for the science major, which would be the harder organic chemisty class (prereq for that would be 1 full year of general chem for the science major.). For the nursing student, however, they specify the requirement as "chemisty with an organic component," which is very different from the course mentioned above. The prereq for this class would be "Elemental survey of chemistry" for the non-hard science major. Hope this helps. :) Amber
  6. Amberf

    Is anyone an L.P.N. in the Army?

    Yeah, LPN's definitely took a huge hit. And it's sad to see, because on the wards/Aid Stations I've worked in, the lpn's that received training/licenses before 91W was implemented have been a major resource for pt care. A lot of times, I've noticed that the 91W just don't have the training/qualifications to operate on the same level that the 91C's did. And good luck to you as well :)
  7. Amberf

    Is anyone an L.P.N. in the Army?

    Yeah, LPN's definitely took a huge hit. And it's sad to see, because on the wards/Aid Stations I've worked in, the lpn's that received training/licenses before 91W was implemented have been a major resource for pt care. A lot of times, I've noticed that the 91W just don't have the training/qualifications to operate on the same level that the 91C's did. And good luck to you as well :)
  8. Amberf

    Is anyone an L.P.N. in the Army?

    This was a double post :)
  9. Amberf

    Is anyone an L.P.N. in the Army?

    Actually, I just got out of the Army not too long ago. I was a 91B (medical specialist). At the time, there was a separation between 91B and 91C (LPN). However, as of mid-February 2001, they were indeed merged to the mos 91W. 91C's were converted to 91W and obtained an identifier. The 91W school is 10 weeks long after basic training, and trains a person to be an EMT with minor bedside nusing skills. You would become a 91W10 upon graduation, until the rank of E-5 (sergeant) at which point you would become 91W20 (this is the designation for any MOS as you gain rank.), E-6 91W30, so on and so forth. I would NOT enter the Army now as a 91W, but I know friends that have entered and received an identifer. However, even if you have the identifier, it's no guarantee that you'll enter a unit where you would have a good experience to put your Lpn skills to work. If you're looking to receive only LPN training, you may be better off looking into civilian schools. If you're looking for meaningful technical healthcare education in the military, I would advise looking into the Air Force. Not only do they have a healthcare tech program that is worthwhile, they have a better overall quality of life than the Army (my husband is Air Force). I've read (on these boards, actually) that after MOS graduation, you must complete two healthcare-related tests at your first duty assignment. This combined with (I think it's one year?) bedside patient care experience, allows you to challenge some state board exams for Lpn, such as California. I hope this helps, and best of luck to you. Edit As a side note, I continued with the Army reserves as a 91D, Surgical Technologist. In the military hospitals I've worked in, I've never heard of an Army LPN being allowed to first assist (though I have heard of them occasionally scrubbing in). Attaining first assist requires 1) Passing the CST (Certified Surg Tech) licensing exam, 2) Completing not only a certain amount of surgeries scrubbed in, but a high number of surgeries scrubbed in as first assist after you've passed the CST. 3) Passing the First Assist licensing exam. RN's are frequently sent through extra courses to become a scrub nurse, but even they require certification (and a great deal of knowledge on both ends about wound types/healing, sutures, A&P, surgical specialties, etc.)