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cinnybun

cinnybun

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  1. cinnybun

    Should I take chemistry?

    Hi, I just wanted to drop in and share something that might inspire those who are holding back on taking Chemistry before nursing school. As of 3:00 today I finished my second and final semester of college chemistry. Chemistry 1 was 14 weeks in length and Chem ll was CRAMMED into 7 weeks! We learned everything from the basics (periodic table, nonmenclature, the mol, etc) to stoichiometry, organic chemistry, bio chemistry, redox, acids and bases, pH, [H+], [OH-], pKa....and more. When I first started the course it seemed impossible. I thought there was no way I would be able to get my head around so much information and not only pass, but do well enough to get accepted into nursing school. I should mention that in highschool I got 15% in my grade 10 science class!!! Now fastforward to right now (24 years old) and not only did I finish the two semesters but I destroyed them. My first semester I finished with an 84% (I could have done much better than this), and this semester I did even better...even though my professor told us that our grades would dramatically decrease from semester 1 (and it did for everyone else). On my first test I got 95%, the second 92% and I had my exam today and would ballpark it at a 95-98% (crossing fingers). My point to all this is, sure....chemistry is intimidating, but if you cant do really well in chemistry, you probably wont do amazing in nursing school. I may be wrong on this, but the way I see it is that taking chemistry is just another challenge...another test to see not only how dedicated you are to learning, but how dedicated you are to improving yourself and testing your limitations. Although I start nursing school in September, I already know that it will be full of moments that will test me to the core. Taking any course that challenges the way/what you learn/feel/believe is only going to make you a STRONGER student and person in the end. Goodluck and take the chemistry....but dont just take it to pass. GIVE IT YOUR ALL and you will be amazed at what you can accomplish. This attitude is contagious and will follow you into nursing school. Goodluck :)
  2. cinnybun

    George Brown College

    I might be able to help answer you question. I was accepted into the rpn program at George Brown and I was required to take a test to see if they would accept me. I was told that they would look at the scores from the test and my GPA for entrance. So I took the test and I was scared as hell because at the time I was only at midterms in college taking Biology and Chemistry 1...so I knew that the test would cover alot of stuff that I hadnt learned yet. Low and behold when I sat down to write the science component of the test I was completely devastated. I didnt know the answers to ALOT of the questions, but I used my knowledge from Bio 1 and Chem 1 to make educated guesses. I ended up reviewing the test 3 times just to make sure my guessing were rational. You are also required to write an essay in an hour, which was no problem for me but can be difficult for some, and take a hearing test. Overall, be prepared to spend at least 4 hours there, as it can take a long time. I ended up leaving certain that I failed and wouldnt get accepted but 2 days later I got an email saying that I had been accepted into the program (they told me this would take at least a month)...I couldnt believe it! Since then I have decided to go to Durham College instead as it is way closer, but I have been to GB before and LOVED it (just didnt like the commute). Goodluck with eveything and I hope you get in!!
  3. cinnybun

    George Brown College

    Hi there, I went to George Brown college for Hotel Management last year and really enjoyed it there. I don't know about the other posters experiences but I have had nothing but positive experiences there. As far as administration goes, any inquiries I had were answered very quickly and when I withdrew from the program it was a very easy process and everything was done correctly. Make sure you take advantage of the fact that it is primarly a chef training school! There is a little shop called "On the Run" in the B building I think? (behind the main building where your nursing classes will probably be) that sells the food that the chef training students make in class...for cheeeap! The food is really really good and there is a different menu everyday and it will cost you no more than $3 or so for an entree...the desserts are really good too. Also, take a long walk through all of the buildings on campus. There are so many amazing hidden study spots in that school. The 5th floor in the main building is my favorite because theres lots of tables and chairs and it is where all the hearing impaired students hang out so its always quiet. Goodluck and enjoy :)
  4. Thank you to everyone for replying. Your input has been very helpful! It seems that taking the RPN route then choosing to get my RN later if I wish is the safest route to go in these unstable times. If I decide to eventually become an RN, will I still be able to take jobs as an RPN if I wish? Thanks again!
  5. Hello to all of you fabulous nurses and students on allnurses.com! :) I recently came across this site and have found it to be an amazing source of information, but I still have some very important unanswered questions. I just finished up my first semester of Pre Health and have been accepted into the Practical Nursing program at a local college for September. If I decide to go into Practical Nursing I won't have to finish semester two of my Pre Health, as I have already finished the requirements set for that program. This leads me to Option #1 - I work at the college until September and go into Practical Nursing in September. The benefit of this would be that I could work throughout the summer and save to buy a car to get me to and from placement come school time. The downside to this is that I will be entering into the Practical Nursing Program and not the RN Program and will have to bridge later on, as I would love to be an Operating Room nurse one day. If I decide to get my RN afterwards, I could bridge and get my RN within 5 years time. Option #2 involves continuing into semester two of my Pre Health program in order to "maybe" get into the RN program at a local university. I have been told by the Registrar that because I started my Pre Health in January they will not have my final grades until the end of August and it is likely that there will not be any seats left for me at that time. I can risk it and continue in my Pre Health program with hopes that I may get accepted but chances are slim. This would involve taking Chemistry ll and Biology ll and only being able to work minimal hours during that time. This means not having the money to purchase a car and I may not get into the program. Option #3 - I continue onto semester 2 of Pre Health, completing my pre reqs to get into an RN program and see if I get accepted into the school listed above in Option #2. If I do not get it I would wait another year, working and saving up money for a car and taking classes to alleviate my workload for the RN program that I would be going into in a year. It will take me 5 years to get my RN by taking this path. My question for all of you wonderful nurses out there is, which route do you think is better? I am very eager to get started and have a very high average. I am leaning more towards getting started right away by taking Practical Nursing. I also feel that I may be better suited as a college student in a more hands on environment, as it would allow me to "get my feet wet" and bridge to an RN later. What are your thoughts on this? Another reason why I'm leaning more towards this path is because I have heard that RNs are losing jobs across Ontario and that RPNs may one day have a higher chance of getting them over RNs. Can anyone offer me some insight on this? I would hate to wait and take the RN program only to find out that I should have done the RPN because I no longer have the job security I was looking for. My ultimate goal is also to work in the Operating Room. Do RPNs work in operating rooms or are they most often limited to LTC facilities and Med/ Surg. floors? I have no nursing experience at this time so I cannot say if working in those areas is something that interests me. I have always imagined myself in the OR, ER, or ICU. Any input/ help in these areas would be GREATLY appreciated. I have to make my decision soon, as semester 2 starts in 2 weeks. It seems that I am changing my mind daily as to which path I should take and really need some guidance from nurses who have been through what I'm going through or can help me make my decision. Thank you in advance for all of your support! :redpinkhe
  6. Hello to all of you fabulous nurses and students on allnurses.com! :) I recently came across this site and have found it to be an amazing source of information, but I still have some very important unanswered questions. I just finished up my first semester of Pre Health and have been accepted into the Practical Nursing program at a local college for September. If I decide to go into Practical Nursing I won't have to finish semester two of my Pre Health, as I have already finished the requirements set for that program. This leads me to Option #1 - I work at the college until September and go into Practical Nursing in September. The benefit of this would be that I could work throughout the summer and save to buy a car to get me to and from placement come school time. The downside to this is that I will be entering into the Practical Nursing Program and not the RN Program and will have to bridge later on, as I would love to be an Operating Room nurse one day. If I decide to get my RN afterwards, I could bridge and get my RN within 5 years time. Option #2 involves continuing into semester two of my Pre Health program in order to "maybe" get into the RN program at a local university. I have been told by the Registrar that because I started my Pre Health in January they will not have my final grades until the end of August and it is likely that there will not be any seats left for me at that time. I can risk it and continue in my Pre Health program with hopes that I may get accepted but chances are slim. This would involve taking Chemistry ll and Biology ll and only being able to work minimal hours during that time. This means not having the money to purchase a car and I may not get into the program. Option #3 - I continue onto semester 2 of Pre Health, completing my pre reqs to get into an RN program and see if I get accepted into the school listed above in Option #2. If I do not get it I would wait another year, working and saving up money for a car and taking classes to alleviate my workload for the RN program that I would be going into in a year. It will take me 5 years to get my RN by taking this path. My question for all of you wonderful nurses out there is, which route do you think is better? I am very eager to get started and have a very high average. I am leaning more towards getting started right away by taking Practical Nursing. I also feel that I may be better suited as a college student in a more hands on environment, as it would allow me to "get my feet wet" and bridge to an RN later. What are your thoughts on this? Another reason why I'm leaning more towards this path is because I have heard that RNs are losing jobs across Ontario and that RPNs may one day have a higher chance of getting them over RNs. Can anyone offer me some insight on this? I would hate to wait and take the RN program only to find out that I should have done the RPN because I no longer have the job security I was looking for. My ultimate goal is also to work in the Operating Room. Do RPNs work in operating rooms or are they most often limited to LTC facilities and Med/ Surg. floors? I have no nursing experience at this time so I cannot say if working in those areas is something that interests me. I have always imagined myself in the OR, ER, or ICU. Any input/ help in these areas would be GREATLY appreciated. I have to make my decision soon, as semester 2 starts in 2 weeks. It seems that I am changing my mind daily as to which path I should take and really need some guidance from nurses who have been through what I'm going through or can help me make my decision. Thank you in advance for all of your support! :redpinkhe
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